Mark Harris
Novelist, screenwriter, memoirist, academic
Mark Harris
Mark Harris was an American novelist, literary biographer, and educator.
Biography
Mark Harris's personal information overview.
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News
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Jimmy Fallon Never Recovered From His Disastrous Trump Interview
Huffington Post - 4 days
In September, back when President Donald Trump was still just the Republican presidential nominee, Jimmy Fallon invited him to appear on “The Tonight Show” for some fun and games.  The decision to have Trump on at all proved controversial at the time, as some thought Fallon should have gone the way of Seth Meyers, who months earlier had banned Trump from his late-night show for as long as the Trump banned The Washington Post from his rallies.  But the interview itself led to another level of anger for liberals around the country. Rather than confront Trump about his decision to build a campaign on xenophobic promises, Fallon went the other way, tossing him softball questions about coins and laughing uproariously at Trump’s joke about hamburgers. He even ruffled Trump’s hair. Fallon’s interview, in many people’s eyes, was a not just embarrassing, but dangerous, normalizing the views of a seemingly unstable man who was threatening the central tenets of the country, all in ex ...
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Huffington Post article
Sunny Pawar At Golden Globes Made The Internet's Collective Heart Melt
Huffington Post - about 2 months
There may have been many shining stars in attendance at Sunday night’s Golden Globe Awards, but the internet thought a particularly little one sparkled brightest.  Sunny Pawar, who plays young Saroo in the film “Lion,” joined co-star Dev Patel on stage to help introduce a clip from their movie.  And, boy, did he make our collective hearts roar.  Dev Patel and Sunny Pawar introduce a clip from @LionMovie, which is nominated for Best Motion Picture - Drama. #GoldenGlobes pic.twitter.com/V17ztQmaAA — Golden Globe Awards (@goldenglobes) January 9, 2017 The precious 8-year-old’s delightful smile quickly drew in “aww”s from the crowd. Then, Pawar’s adorably confident introduction of the film after Patel lifted him up to the mic really left everyone in pieces.  Though the young actor was only on stage for a few short moments, that was all it took to make the entire Twitter-sphere melt. And, as you can see below, celebrities and others weren’t afraid to shout the ...
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Huffington Post article
Russia Stole The Presidency. The Electoral College Can Take It Back.
Huffington Post - 3 months
We now know that the American election was stolen by a loose affiliation of Russian infiltrators, American white supremacists, and FBI enablers -- with an assist from elected quislings like Mitch McConnell. Donald Trump, it turns out, is no more the duly elected president of the United States than I am the world's most decorated ballerina. Luckily, this can be rectified. You see, Donald Trump is by legal definition not the elected president. He is not even president-elect (a fictitious title, nowhere supported by the Constitution). He will not become president until the Electoral College votes him into office on December 19. And -- unless you sympathize with the notion of Vladimir Putin choosing the American Commander in Chief -- that must not happen. We have heard a great deal about how dissenting electors would somehow be traitorous; how they would subvert the will of the people; how they would be deeply un-American. It is time to dismiss this sophistry. First, we know w ...
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Huffington Post article
Trump Jr.'s Poisoned Skittles Tweet Goes Horrifically -- And Hilariously -- Awry
Huffington Post - 5 months
function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); Donald Trump Jr. might want to lay off the candy.  The son of the Republican presidential candidate was skewered on Twitter on Monday for his bizarre comparison of refugees to a bowl of Skittles (some of which had been poisoned). Here’s Trump’s original tweet:  This image says it all. Let's end the politically correct agenda that doesn't put America first. #trump2016 pic.twitter.com/9fHwog7ssN — Donald Trump Jr. (@DonaldJTrumpJr) September 19, 2016 ...
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Huffington Post article
People Are Justifiably Infuriated With How Jimmy Fallon Handled Trump
Huffington Post - 5 months
Jimmy Fallon had Donald Trump on “The Tonight Show” Thursday night, and all some people could talk about afterward was a head rub. Toward the end of the interview, Fallon asked the Republican presidential nominee if he could mess up his famous head of hair on live TV, leading to raucous applause and the sort of bite-sized video that both the creators and consumers of internet media eat up.  Before the rub, Fallon did sneak in a few subtle quips, like asking Trump if he knew what a coin was, or suggesting that he still has time to drop out if he decides he no longer wants to become president. But by and large, Fallon’s interview was an extended on-air puff piece, filled with the same sort of polite give-and-take a late-night host reserves for an actor on an obligatory promotional tour. Throughout the interview, Fallon was predictably non-confrontational and willing to work with whatever Trump gave him. When Trump made a joke about fearing what people might do to his hamburgers i ...
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Huffington Post article
6 Things You Didn't Know About The Industry Of Death
Huffington Post - about 1 year
Nothing is certain in life but death and taxes. What isn't certain, though, is how much that death is going to cost you. The Huffington Post took a dive into the industry that provides nearly everyone's final rite of passage and came up with some interesting facts: 1. The funeral industry is a $16 billion a year industry, but is shrinking. Since death doesn't stop in a bad economy, funeral services is what they call a recession-proof industry. But funeral homes have felt a pinch in the last couple of decades. In 1997 the industry pulled in $12.6 billion (about $18.6 billion in 2015 dollars), according to the National Funeral Directors Association (NFDA). In 2012, revenues were $16.3 billion (about $16.9 billion adjusted for inflation). The industry also lost about 20,000 jobs over that period. Business is likely to get a bit better as a huge crop of Baby Boomers advance through retirement age, but if more of them opt for cremation, which is cheaper, the industry still might no ...
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Huffington Post article
What We're Reading
Huffington Post - about 1 year
Welcome back! I hope you had a wonderful holiday, and put into practice Josh Rosenau's helpful advice if there was a monster at your Thanksgiving table. We've got a nice collection of articles for you this week, from tardigrades to koalas, and from Iraq to Miami to the halls of Congress. Enjoy! The Young Iraqis Promoting Evolutionary Theory and Rational Thought to Save Iraq, Niqash, January 10, 2015 (but still timely) -- Young Iraqis are working to save their country by, among other things, translating books about evolution and other sciences into Arabic. (Thanks to Salman Hameed for the link.) The Koala in the Coal Mine, TakePart, November 30, 2015 -- Koalas are outstandingly cute, but they're also outstandingly at risk from climate change, Todd Woody explains. (What about the drop bear, though?) The Rocks Don't Lie: A Geologist Investigates Noah's Flood, by David Montgomery, BioLogos, December 1, 2015 -- Mark Harris of the University of Edinburgh contributes a thou ...
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Huffington Post article
5 Hot Books: John Irving's New Novel, and Letters From Actress Mary Louise Parker
Huffington Post - over 1 year
The following article first appeared in The National Book Review 1. Dear Mr. You by Mary Louise Parker (Scribner) Parker is known as the marijuana-dealing widow and mother of two in the Showtime series Weeds, and a tragic young woman in the crowd-pleasing film Fried Green Tomatoes. Now the Tony- Emmy- and Golden Globe-winning actress has written an epistolary memoir in an original and strikingly effective form: letters to real and imaginary men in her life, from former boyfriends to the uncle of the baby she adopted. 2. Dark Matter and the Dinosaurs: The Astounding Interconnectedness of the Universe by Lisa Randall (Ecco) Author of best-sellers Warped Passages and Knocking on Heaven's Door, Randall, a Harvard professor, is one of the world's leading experts on particle physics and cosmology. In Dark Matter and the Dinosaurs, she takes readers on an illuminating scientific adventure, beginning 66 million years ago, that connects dinosaurs, comets, DNA, and the future of the p ...
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Huffington Post article
11 Fascinating Books to Help Us Talk About Death and Dying
Huffington Post - over 1 year
By Allison Tyler | Off the Shelf Death. It happens to everyone. Knowledge is power, so we've created a list of books to introduce you to many of the curiosities that the "D" word has to offer. Each of these books approaches the subject of our demise with respect and candor and, although death isn't a lark, there's humor to be found, too. Pick one up, take a deep breath, and prepare for a walk on what lies just on the other side.   Stiff by Mary Roach In this fascinating bestseller, Mary Roach details topics from dissection to decay, live burials to body snatching, human head transplants to medical cannibalism, all the way through to what can happen to your body after you've donated it to science. Read the review here.   Smoke Gets in Your Eyes by Caitlin Doughty Why would anyone choose to become a mortician? Caitlin Doughty explains in her hands-on, candid, often-humorous romp through her employment in a crematorium. If you've wondered what happens when a body is ...
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Huffington Post article
'Scandal' Takes On Institutionalized Racism And Police Brutality In Ferguson-Inspired Episode
Huffington Post - almost 2 years
Thursday night's "Scandal" focused on the shooting of an unarmed black teen named Brandon Parker in Washington, D.C., less than two miles from the White House. In the episode, called "The Lawn Chair," tensions run high as the boy's father positions himself in front of his son's body with a shotgun, refusing to move from the crime scene. Mere days after being held hostage and auctioned on the black market, Olivia Pope is brought on the help the police force manage the incident. She works to avoid a riot, but soon finds herself disillusioned by the people she is defending. It doesn't take long for Liv to be swayed by the injustice, and she joins forces with the activist leading the crowd surrounding Brandon and his father Clarence. "Stand up. Fight back. No more black men under attack," she chants. She then does some classic Olivia Pope maneuvering to convince Attorney General David Rosen to grant a subpoena for footage of the altercation. "That man standing over his son's body thi ...
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Huffington Post article
This Year's Oscar Season Is So Boring
Huffington Post - about 3 years
Welcome to For Your Consideration, an unapologetically obsessive conversation about the Oscar race. Between now and March 2, 2014, Vanity Fair digital director Michael Hogan and Huffington Post senior entertainment editor Christopher Rosen will survey the landscape in advance of the 86th annual Academy Awards. Rosen: Hello, Mike! It's been so long since we corresponded that cobwebs have begun to form on our unofficial Oscar prognosticator badges. We last discussed the 86th annual Academy Awards on Jan. 16, the day of the nominations. Since then, a lot has happened, but nothing has happened. "American Hustle" took home the Screen Actors Guild Awards' top honor, "Gravity" and "12 Years A Slave" tied at the Producers Guild Awards, and "Gravity" director Alfonso Cuaron won at the Directors Guild Awards. Matthew McConaughey, Cate Blanchett, Jared Leto and Lupita Nyong'o, meanwhile, all put firm grips on their respective acting categories following wins at the Screen Actors Guild Awards. Onl ...
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Huffington Post article
Contraception, Abortion Issues Arise In Close North Carolina Senate Race
Huffington Post - about 3 years
All five Republican candidates vying to unseat Sen. Kay Hagan (D-N.C.) believe that states have the authority to ban contraceptives and would support a fetal "personhood" amendment to the U.S. Constitution, the News and Observer reported Monday. At a Republican candidate forum last month and in interviews with the News and Observer, the candidates clarified where they stand on issues such as abortion, banning contraceptives and the Affordable Care Act's contraceptive mandate. The Republican candidates all favor a “personhood” constitutional amendment that would grant legal protections to a fertilized human egg. According to experts, such an amendment could also ban some forms of birth control. Three of the leading contenders -- North Carolina's House speaker, Thom Tillis, obstetrician Greg Brannon and Rev. Mark Harris -- said they believe abortion should be illegal except to save the life of the mother (Brannon and Harris) or in those cases, plus in cases of rape and incest (Til ...
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Huffington Post article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Mark Harris
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 2007
    Age 84
    Died on May 30, 2007.
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  • FIFTIES
  • 1980
    Age 57
    In September 1980, he joined the faculty of Arizona State, where he was a professor of English and taught in the creative writing program until his retirement in 2001.
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  • THIRTIES
  • 1961
    Age 38
    In the first chapter of his 1961 classic The Rhetoric of Fiction, Wayne C. Booth quotes the "fine young novelist" Harris as saying: "You will no more expect the novelist to tell you precisely how something is said than you will expect him to stand by your chair and hold your book."
    More Details Hide Details In January 1962, Something About a Soldier, a stage version of Harris's novel, played briefly on Broadway. Written by Ernest Kinoy and produced by the Theatre Guild, it featured Sal Mineo in the lead role. Later, the novel Bang the Drum Slowly was adapted into a stage play at the Next Theatre in Evanston, Illinois. His nephew (the son of Harris's sister Martha Finkelstein) is the writer Saïd Sayrafiezadeh, author of the memoir When Skateboards Will Be Free: A Memoir of a Political Childhood. http://www.salon.com/books/review/2009/03/31/family_memoirs/index.html Harris died of complications of Alzheimer's disease at Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital at age 84. He was survived by his wife, Josephine Horen; his sister, Martha; two sons, one daughter, and three grandchildren. Harris was best known for a quartet of novels about baseball players: The Southpaw (1953), Bang the Drum Slowly (1956), A Ticket for a Seamstitch (1957), and It Looked Like For Ever (1979). Written in the vernacular, the books are the account of Henry "Author" Wiggen, a pitcher for the fictional New York Mammoths. In 1956, Bang the Drum Slowly was adapted for an installment of the dramatic television anthology series The United States Steel Hour; the production starred Paul Newman as Wiggen and Albert Salmi as doomed catcher Bruce Pearson. The novel also became a major motion picture in 1973, with a screenplay written by Harris, directed by John D. Hancock and featuring Michael Moriarty as Wiggen and Robert De Niro as Pearson.
  • 1960
    Age 37
    In 1960, while in his first college teaching position, at San Francisco State College, Harris promoted his then-most-recent book in a TV appearance as guest contestant in "You Bet Your Life", a game played on The Groucho Show.
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  • 1956
    Age 33
    In September 1956, he was hired by the English department of San Francisco State College, where he taught until 1967.
    More Details Hide Details He went on to teach at several other universities, including Purdue (1967–1970), California Institute of the Arts (1970–1972), the University of Southern California (1973–1975), and the University of Pittsburgh (1976–1980).
  • TWENTIES
  • 1948
    Age 25
    In February 1948, Harris abandoned journalism to enroll in the University of Denver, from which he received a Master's degree in English in 1951 as well as obtaining a PhD in American Studies from the University of Minnesota in 1956, writing his doctoral dissertation on the progressive writer and intellectual Randolph Bourne.
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  • 1946
    Age 23
    His first novel, Trumpet to the World, is the story of a young black soldier married to a white woman who is put on trial for striking back at a white officer, was published in 1946, and he continued to produce novels and contribute to periodicals through the years.
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    After resigning in July 1946, he spent the next year and a half in a succession of short-lived journalism jobs in Albuquerque, New Mexico (Albuquerque Journal), Chicago (Negro Digest and Ebony), and New York (Park Row News Service).
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    While there, he met coworker Josephine Horen, whom he would marry in March 1946.
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  • 1945
    Age 22
    In July 1945 he was hired by the International News Service and moved to St. Louis.
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  • 1944
    Age 21
    Harris joined The Daily Item of Port Chester, New York, as a reporter in May 1944.
    More Details Hide Details A year later he accepted a position with PM in New York City but was fired after two months.
    He was honorably discharged in April 1944.
    More Details Hide Details His wartime experience formed the basis for two of his novels, Trumpet to the World (1946) and Something About a Soldier (1957).
    His growing opposition to war and his anger at the prevalence of racial discrimination in the Army led him to go AWOL from Camp Wheeler, Georgia, in February 1944.
    More Details Hide Details He was soon arrested and then hospitalized for psychoneurosis.
  • 1943
    Age 20
    He was drafted into the United States Army in January 1943.
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  • TEENAGE
  • 1940
    Age 17
    After graduating in 1940 from Mount Vernon High School, he dropped his surname because "it was a difficult time for kids with Jewish names to get jobs."
    More Details Hide Details He subsequently went to work for Paul Winkler's Press Alliance news agency in New York City as a messenger and mimeograph operator.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1922
    Born
    Born on November 19, 1922.
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Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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