Mark Strong
English actor
Mark Strong
Mark Strong is an English actor. He is best known for his roles in films such as RocknRolla, Body of Lies, Syriana, The Young Victoria, Sherlock Holmes, Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy, Kick-Ass, Green Lantern, Robin Hood, and John Carter. He often portrays villains or antagonists.
Biography
Mark Strong's personal information overview.
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News
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Post-Truth Heroine: Miss Sloane
Huffington Post - 3 months
Oxford Dictionaries just declared "post-truth" as its 2016 international word of the year. The heart of the definition is how public opinion is shaped less by objective facts and more by emotional appeals. Which brings me to the movie, Miss Sloane, directed by John Madden and starring Jessica Chastain. Billed as a political thriller, I prefer to call it a drama filled with plenty of edgy twists and turns, and, yes politics are involved. On its surface, the game is about the gun lobby and its opposition. The real story is about Power--its pursuit, the avid hunger for it, and who can play the game best. The movie is also a character study. Enter Elizabeth Sloane, the Machiavellian heroine/villain of the movie. She's a successful special-interest lobbyist on Capitol Hill, who is driven to win and appears to give little thought to the various causes she represents, or to the people she uses to achieve her goals. She manipulates not only the truth, but the emotions of the people ...
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Huffington Post article
Arthur Miller, Mark Strong, A View From the Bridge</em>
Huffington Post - about 1 year
Ronald Tiersky January 9, 2016 Arthur Miller, Mark Strong: 'A view from the bridge' (Lyceum Theater, Manhattan, dir. Ivo van Hove, until Feb. 21) Catharsis. The London Young Vic's revival production of Arthur Miller's A View From the Bridge (1956) is a mesmerizing theater experience that echoes Greek tragedy as Athenian theatergoers must have felt it. In its conception, mid-twentieth century playwright Miller demonstrated that the American Common Man and the Greek Hero inhabit the same world, whatever differences of time, place and culture. To see this play is to recognize again Miller's achievement -- connecting modern America with universal history. America may be a uniquely exceptional experiment in democratic life but it's also viscerally embedded in the evolution of human civilization, a product of the very life force it strains to dominate. Willy Loman in his way fought the same battles as Achilles. Set in 1950s Brooklyn (thus "A view from the bridge" is the Brooklyn B ...
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Huffington Post article
On the Culture Front: Jerry Seinfeld, <i>Fiddler On the Roof</i> and More
Huffington Post - about 1 year
Jerry Seinfeld took the stage last night at the Beacon Theatre for the first time in a long time. The excitement coursing through the audience was palpable. I found myself giddy with anticipation and when he appeared onstage after a theatrical post-opener blackout, it was hard to believe that he was there in the flesh - knowing him from my well-worn copy of the Seinfeld DVD set and his more recent webisode series, "Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee." He alluded to the familiarity that we felt with him with a gracious "we know each other" and then thanked us for coming out. This turned out to not just be a social convention but the beginning of one of the strongest bits of the night on the hassles and undue preparations of "going out." Whether he was talking about the dilemma of whether to get dinner before the show or after the show or simply in deciding what restaurant to go to, an existential current pulsed below as it does in all of his best material. What are we doing here? How are w ...
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Huffington Post article
Stage Door: <i>Once Upon A Mattress, A View From The Bridge</i>
Huffington Post - about 1 year
Fairy tales that end with the proverbial "everyone lived happily ever after" are strictly lightweight, one-note fare. The revival of Once Upon a Mattress off-Broadway at the Abrons Arts Center, is no exception. The one twist: the popular Jackie Hoffman is Princess Winifred, while John "Lypsinka" Epperson snarls his way through Queen Aggravain with campy vigor in the musical version of "The Princess and the Pea." Set in 15th-century Europe, a medieval kingdom is ruled by the sneaky Queen and her mute husband King Sextimus (a graceful David Greenspan). Sextimus is doomed to stay silent until a peculiar curse is lifted: "when the mouse devours the hawk." Ostensibly, the royals are trying to marry off their son, Prince Dauntless (Jason SweetTooth Williams). In reality, the Queen has no interest in seeing her drab boy wed, devising absurd tests to discourage all possible mates. And if Dauntless stays single, so does the rest of the kingdom. So Sir Harry (Zak Resnick), beso ...
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Huffington Post article
Mark Strong on life without props at 'View From the Bridge'
Yahoo News - about 1 year
NEW YORK (AP) — Mark Strong is making his Broadway debut this fall playing anti-hero Eddie Carbone in a revolutionary revival of Arthur Miller's "A View From the Bridge." How revolutionary? Strong doesn't wear shoes.
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Yahoo News article
FACE IT: A View From the Audience
Huffington Post - over 1 year
The most talked about new production on Broadway -- no, I haven't forgotten Hamilton, but it's been up for five months -- is A View From The Bridge , the audacious and pared-down version of the Arthur Miller play. Starring Mark Strong, there are many notable things about this version, including the bare feet to go along with the bare bones, and the use of only one real prop. And yes, there will be blood. Director Ivo Van Hove (from Belgium and arguably the world's hottest stage director) has also placed chunks of the audience on the sides of the stage. It is framed to resemble a boxing match, so the idea of fans watching in the round makes some sense. Though, while those fans would be standing and cheering, these dare not make a move, cough, or unwrap a candy. The actor most affected by this approach is Michael Gould, the Brit (they are all Brits, coming with the production from London) who both narrates the play as a Greek chorus of sorts, and occasionally moves into the action i ...
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Huffington Post article
Theater: Strong But Cracked "Bridge," Miserable "Misery," And Pledging "Allegiance"
Huffington Post - over 1 year
MISERY * out of **** A VIEW FROM THE BRIDGE *** out of **** ALLEGIANCE ** ½ out of **** MISERY * out of **** BROADHURST THEATRE A bad idea poorly executed, a stage adaptation of the Oscar-winning film Misery has been kicking around for years. It's hard to know why. What might seem creepy on film plays as silly and campy on stage. We sit and watch best-selling author Paul Sheldon trapped in the home of his "number one fan" Annie Wilkes after a car accident left him with two broken legs. Rather creepily, the audience awaits and applauds two iconic moments in the tension-free show: the scene where Annie crushes his ankles with a sledge-hammer and the scene where Paul chokes her to death. Since that signals the end is near, insert here your own joke about being put out of misery. Clearly, fans are there to see Bruce Willis as Paul and the excellent stage actress Laurie Metcalf as Annie. Willis has goodwill to spare, from Moonlighting to the Die Hard films and beyond. Metcalf ...
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Huffington Post article
<i>A View From the Bridge</i>: A British Import Vies for Best Drama Revival
Huffington Post - over 1 year
The stage at the Lyceum Theater for this exceptional theater event, the current revival of Arthur Miller's A View From the Bridge looks like a set for a boxing match, with audience on three sides, not the more traditional sitting room of a Brooklyn apartment. Director Ivo van Hove's vision goes for the iconic: a fight ring, a stand-in for a battle of emotion. Unlike a previous New York revival where an actual bridge looked to the joining of boroughs, in this production's abstract conception, the bridge, a device for transitions may refer to coming to America, old school mores versus new, life and death. The bridge may be the play's trans-Atlantic journey from London's Young Vic production to these shores. Most powerfully, here invisible, the bridge is yours to imagine. Stripped raw, Arthur Miller's tragedy in Red Hook underscores the physical in this survival story, even as death is the body's ultimate defeat. Opening with two male figures washing themselves down after a day's work, ...
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Huffington Post article
First Nighter: Ivo van Hove Does Wonders With Arthur Miller's <i>View From the Bridge</i>-
Huffington Post - over 1 year
The tic I find annoying in the work of very busy director Ivo van Hove is happily suppressed for his revival of A View From the Bridge, birthday-boy Arthur Miller's unrelenting, as usual, play. That's why I don't hesitate to call this production the best he's ever targeted for the theater-going public. The tic to which I refer is van Hove's habit of examining plays -- by Eugene O'Neill, Tennessee Williams, Henrik Ibsen, Ingmar Bergman (in his case, the Scenes From a Marriage film)--for their subtexts so that he then can baldly stage the subtext(s) he's discerned. Others may find the approach adventurous, involving. I find it uncalled for and, really, indefensible. The reason he shifts gears for A View From the Bridge, at the Lyceum, may be because Miller beat him to it. The playwright wasn't reticent about stressing his respect for Greek tragedy, and nowhere more bluntly than he flaunts it here. The harrowing opus begins with a lawyer called Alfieri (Michael Gould), who could ...
Article Link:
Huffington Post article
First Nighter: Ivo van Hove Does Wonders With Arthur Miller's <i>View From the Bridge</i>-
Huffington Post - over 1 year
The tic I find annoying in the work of very busy director Ivo van Hove is happily suppressed for his revival of A View From the Bridge, birthday-boy Arthur Miller's unrelenting, as usual, play. That's why I don't hesitate to call this production the best he's ever targeted for the theater-going public. The tic to which I refer is van Hove's habit of examining plays -- by Eugene O'Neill, Tennessee Williams, Henrik Ibsen, Ingmar Bergman (in his case, the Scenes From a Marriage film)--for their subtexts so that he then can baldly stage the subtext(s) he's discerned. Others may find the approach adventurous, involving. I find it uncalled for and, really, indefensible. The reason he shifts gears for A View From the Bridge, at the Lyceum, may be because Miller beat him to it. The playwright wasn't reticent about stressing his respect for Greek tragedy, and nowhere more bluntly than he flaunts it here. The harrowing opus begins with a lawyer called Alfieri (Michael Gould), who could just ...
Article Link:
Huffington Post article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Mark Strong
    FIFTIES
  • 2016
    Age 52
    In 2016, he starred in the spy action comedy Grimsby, about a British black-ops spy (Strong) whose idiotic brother (Sacha Baron Cohen) is an English football hooligan.
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  • 2015
    Age 51
    Strong was named one of GQ 50 best dressed British men in 2015.
    More Details Hide Details Like his character in Fever Pitch, he supports Arsenal FC.
    In 2015, Strong won the Olivier Award for Best Actor for his role in A View from the Bridge, which he starred in as Eddie Carbone at the Young Vic.
    More Details Hide Details When Strong went over to perform the play on Broadway in New York, he received similar levels of acclaim, and was nominated for the Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Actor in a Play, and the Tony Award for Best Actor in a Play, for his performance.
  • 2014
    Age 50
    Jaguar Cars produced an advertisement in 2014, initially shown during Super Bowl XLVIII and later online and on television, featuring Strong alongside fellow British actors Ben Kingsley and Tom Hiddleston.
    More Details Hide Details It was themed around their recent film roles as villains, and used the tagline "It's good to be bad". That same year, Strong co-starred in the historical drama film The Imitation Game, alongside Benedict Cumberbatch and Keira Knightley, in which he played MI6 chief Stewart Menzies.
  • FORTIES
  • 2012
    Age 48
    In November 2012, Strong and Taissa Farmiga were cast as the lead characters John Washington and Anna Greene in Mindscape, produced by Jaume Collet-Serra, the feature-length directorial debut of Jorge Dorado.
    More Details Hide Details The film centres on a man with the ability to enter people's memories who begins working on the case of a brilliant but problematic teenager to determine whether she is a sociopath or the victim of trauma. The film came to American cinemas in June 2014.
  • 2011
    Age 47
    Also in 2011, he was the voice Pod of The Secret World of Arrietty and the voice of the character Captain Titus of the Ultramarines Chapter in the video game Warhammer 40,000: Space Marine.
    More Details Hide Details The same year, and most notably, he played the role of Jim Prideaux in the remake of Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy, which was earlier played by Ian Bannen in the iconic original 1979 BBC series starring Alec Guinness. The film premiered in competition at the 68th Venice International Film Festival on 5 September 2011. Strong then played Clive Cornell in The Guard (2011), which is the most successful independent Irish film of all time in terms of Irish box-office receipts, overtaking The Wind that Shakes the Barley (2006). He next portrayed the role of Jacob Sternwood in the British thriller Welcome to the Punch. He played Matai Shang, the leader of the Therns in John Carter (2012), and starred in Kathryn Bigelow's action thriller film Zero Dark Thirty (2012) alongside Jessica Chastain, Jason Clarke, and Joel Edgerton. The film had its premiere in Los Angeles on 19 December 2012 and had its wide release on 11 January 2013. The film received wide critical acclaim and was nominated for five Academy Awards, including Best Picture.
    In 2011, he played Thaal Sinestro, Green Lantern and Hal Jordan's mentor, in the superhero film Green Lantern.
    More Details Hide Details Strong said the film "closely follows the early comics. Sinestro starts out as Hal Jordan's mentor, slightly suspicious and not sure of him because obviously Hal is the first human being who's made into a Green Lantern. He's certainly very strict and certainly unsure of the wisdom of Hal becoming a Green Lantern." Strong went on to state that the character "is a military guy but isn't immediately bad. It's the kind of person he is that lends himself to becoming bad over the course of the comics being written, but initially he's quite a heroic figure." He also revealed that the outfit and other aspects of the character very closely follow the character's early days.
  • 2010
    Age 46
    He went on to work with Ridley Scott for a second time in the 2010 epic adventure film Robin Hood, portraying the antagonist Sir Godfrey.
    More Details Hide Details The same year, he played Frank D'Amico, the head of a criminal organisation, in Kick-Ass. Strong says he is drawn to playing the antagonist. He tries to "understand the purpose of the character", and then work on building a believable individual.
  • 2008
    Age 44
    Also in 2008, he portrayed Hani Salaam, the Jordanian intelligence chief and director of the feared GID in Body of Lies, marking his first collaboration with English director Ridley Scott.
    More Details Hide Details Strong's performance as Hani Salaam earned him a nomination for the London Critics Circle Film Award for Best British Supporting Actor and his performance was mentioned by several critics, with Scott calling it "a marvel of exotic suavity and cool insinuation" while Ebert "particularly admired" his aura of suave control. The following year, he played a lead part in the Channel 4 film Endgame, and he played Lord Blackwood, the main villain, in Sherlock Holmes, who has somehow returned after his execution with a plot to take over the British Empire using an arsenal of dark arts and new technologies. The film marked his third time working with director Guy Ritchie.
    In 2008, he played Nick Calderelli in Miss Pettigrew Lives for a Day, Mannie Miesel in Flashbacks of a Fool, Finn in Babylon A.D., Archy in RocknRolla, and Philipp Bouhler in Good.
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  • 2007
    Age 43
    Also in 2007, Strong portrayed Prince Septimus, the youngest of the seven Stormhold princes, in Stardust.
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    In 2007, Strong was one of the final two actors considered for the part of Anton Chigurh in No Country for Old Men; despite the persistence of rumours, he claims he was never offered the part.
    More Details Hide Details Strong was Pinbacker, the insane captain of Icarus I, the first ship that was sent to reignite the Sun in Sunshine (2007). Pinbacker was inspired by the character of Sergeant Pinback from Dark Star. The character's disfiguring burns were influenced by the injuries suffered by F1 driver Niki Lauda.
  • THIRTIES
  • 2003
    Age 39
    At the beginning of the 2000s, Strong appeared in Heartlands and in Shakespeare's Twelfth Night at the Donmar Warehouse, for which he was nominated for the 2003 Laurence Olivier Award for Best Performance in a Supporting Role.
    More Details Hide Details He was later featured in Roman Polanski's Oliver Twist (2005), played Mussawi in the film Syriana (2005), and played an assassin named Sorter in Revolver (2005). Strong portrayed the traitorous Wictred in Tristan & Isolde, showing his talent with swordplay, and since 2006, he has provided the narration in the BBC's genealogy series Who Do You Think You Are?
  • 1997
    Age 33
    He then played the role of Steve in the 1997 film adaptation of Nick Hornby's Fever Pitch, opposite Colin Firth.
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  • 1996
    Age 32
    Strong portrayed the romantic lead, Mr. Knightley, in the 1996 ITV adaptation of Jane Austen's novel Emma.
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  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1963
    Born
    Born on August 5, 1963.
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Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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