Martin Scorsese
American film director
Martin Scorsese
Martin Charles "Marty" Scorsese is an American film director, screenwriter, producer, actor, and film historian. In 1990 he founded The Film Foundation, a non-profit organization dedicated to film preservation, and in 2007 he founded the World Cinema Foundation. He is a recipient of the AFI Life Achievement Award for his contributions to the cinema, and has won an Academy Award, a Palme d'Or, Emmys, Golden Globes, BAFTAs, and DGA Awards.
Biography
Martin Scorsese's personal information overview.
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News
News abour Martin Scorsese from around the web
Martin Scorsese's Next Movie Is Heading To Netflix
Huffington Post - 3 days
Netflix has acquired its most prestigious title yet: a Martin Scorsese movie.  “The Irishman,” a $100 million gangster flick starring Robert De Niro, was initially set up at Paramount, which released Scorsese’s previous film, “Silence.” But with 12-year Paramount chief Brad Grey leaving the studio after a financially spotty 2016, Scorsese and his team opted to package the movie elsewhere, according to IndieWire. “Scorsese’s movie is a risky deal, and Paramount is not in the position to take risks,” a source reportedly told IndieWire. “This way, he can make the project he wants.” In other words, Scorsese’s team wants to work somewhere that executives won’t panic about box-office numbers. That’s presumably a response to “Silence,” which cost $46 million but earned only $7.1 million domestically after proving difficult to market to mainstream moviegoers. Given Scorsese’s status as one of the world’s most famous directors, this news represents a massive shift in distribution tre ...
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Huffington Post article
Still Showing Her Sexy Sadie Side, Dana Fuchs Sets the Stage to Rise and Shine
Huffington Post - 25 days
Whatever happened to Sexy Sadie? Embodied by Dana Fuchs, she's alive and well and ready to knock your socks off -- if you let her. "I would love people to know that I'm first and foremost a songwriter, a singer, and it's very much like that Sadie character," Fuchs said from her Harlem apartment near the end of an hourlong phone conversation in late January while expecting some terrible weather to hit New York City. "But of course, it's my own music," she added, a bad cold making her deep voice sound even lower and sexier. "It's that kind of raw, rocking, soulful music, and I would love people to know that Sadie is Dana Fuchs, who is living as a musician." It's been 10 years since Fuchs (pronounced Fyooks) made her motion picture mark as Sadie, a powerful blues singer, very hip chick and Earth Mother in Across the Universe. Julie Taymor's wonderfully innovative and inexcusably ignored movie set in the 1960s was filled with teen romance, wild imagery and incredibly inventi ...
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Huffington Post article
Oscar Snubs and Surprises
NYTimes - about 1 month
Martin Scorsese, Amy Adams and Pharrell Williams, among others, were shut out by the Oscar nominations, but Mel Gibson and Isabelle Huppert made it in.
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NYTimes article
Scorsese thanks Taiwan for bringing 'Silence' to life
Reuters.com - about 1 month
(Reuters) - Director Martin Scorsese brought his religious film "Silence" back to Taiwan on Thursday, thanking it for providing the filming location for his decades long project.
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Reuters.com article
A-Sides with Jon Chattman: It's a Bird, It's a Plane, It's Another Guy Making Oscar Predictions
Huffington Post - about 1 month
A week from today the nominations for the 89th Academy Awards will be announced, and I'd expect a few jaw-dropping omissions (Ryan Gosling?) and additions (Michael Keaton?) like every year. That said, I think we'll see less surprises this year than in years past (ie. La La will sing and dance to the tune of a lot of nods. I'll also say #oscarssowhite isn't going to happen this year. There's just too many amazing performances and films to pass over this year plus Cheryl Boone Isaacs totally revamped the Academy's voting process. Anyway, here I am writing down my Oscar predictions like everybody else in the world. Read on, and predict your own. Guess right on all, and win a pony! Best Picture I'm going to say the Academy uses eight slots this year, but will add the last two here in case they go all the way or to nine. Arrival Hell or High Water Hidden Figures La La Land Lion Loving Manchester by the Sea Moonlight Hacksaw Ridge Fences Potential Surprises Sil ...
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Huffington Post article
Box Office Pile-Up: Three Major Films Crash and Burn in Same Weekend - Hollywood Reporter
Google News - about 1 month
Hollywood Reporter Box Office Pile-Up: Three Major Films Crash and Burn in Same Weekend Hollywood Reporter Martin Scorsese's 'Silence,' Ben Affleck's 'Live by Night' and 'Monster Trucks' are DOA; elsewhere, 'Hidden Figures' continues to solve the problem and will easily win the long Martin Luther King holiday weekend. The 2017 Martin Luther King holiday ... Box Office: 'Hidden Figures' Soars (Again) as Ben Affleck's 'Live by Night,' 'Monster Trucks' TankVariety 'Hidden Figures' narrowly edges out 'The Bye Bye Man' to top Friday box officeLos Angeles Times Hidden figures: What Trump's AG pick Jeff Sessions wants to keep in the shadowsSalon Huffington Post -PEOPLE.com -Detroit Free Press -TheWrap all 110 news articles »
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Google News article
Martin Scorsese Talks About His New Film 'Silence'
ABC News - about 1 month
The legendary director revealed that he used to want to be a priest.
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ABC News article
Through 'Silence,' Martin Scorsese examines his own spiritual journey
LATimes - about 2 months
At a 1988 dinner following the premiere of Martin Scorsese’s controversial testament of faith, “The Last Temptation of Christ,” Paul Moore, then the Episcopal bishop of New York, told Scorsese about a book he should read. Within a day or two, Moore sent the filmmaker a copy of “Silence,” Shūsaku...
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LATimes article
Celebrity Worship And The American Mind
Huffington Post - about 2 months
We, as the viewing audience, are drawn to celebrities and famous people in ways we are not even aware. Within the lives of the celebrated lie the hopes and dreams of the rest of us. As sitting ducks, if you will, or sitting persons, our minds are like sponges for incoming data and information, because the mind by its very nature is curious. If not for that, it would be difficult to survive. So the mind, and the brain activity that comprises what we have come to consider as "the mind," rapidly assesses, absorbs, and decides most things in milliseconds. With the process so swift, oftentimes we haven't a clue as to why we decide what we decide when we decide it. Our minds are swept away by deluded assumptions, as we bet all we have on our "rightness" when, in fact, in that very instance we are wrong. I know because I have been guilty of it countless times myself. Therefore, our minds, so to speak, often have minds of their own. There is research pointing to the extent to which the vi ...
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Huffington Post article
'Rogue One' Dominates The Holiday Box Office
Huffington Post - 2 months
function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); “Rogue One: A Star Wars Story” remains powerful at the U.S. holiday box office with a dominant $15 million on Christmas Eve and projections of a $120 million-plus haul over the six-day Dec. 21-26 period. Illumination-Universal’s animated comedy “Sing” easily led the rest of the pack on Christmas Eve with a solid $7.9 million, followed by Sony’s “Passengers” with $2.9 million, Fox’s “Assassin’s Creed” with $2.2 million and Fox’s “Why Him?” with $1.8 million. ...
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Huffington Post article
'Silence' is the movie Martin Scorsese has waited a lifetime to make
LATimes - 2 months
Signs around the Hotel Bel-Air, where Martin Scorsese likes to stay when he’s in Los Angeles, make their decorous hopes known. The painted-on directives throughout the canyon retreat strongly encourage quiet — an apt message for a man who just made a movie called “Silence.” Yet coming upon the...
Article Link:
LATimes article
'Silence' is the movie Martin Scorsese has waited a lifetime to make
LATimes - 2 months
Signs around the Hotel Bel-Air, where Martin Scorsese likes to stay when he’s in Los Angeles, make their decorous hopes known. The painted-on directives throughout the canyon retreat strongly encourage quiet — an apt message for a man who just made a movie called “Silence.” Yet coming upon the...
Article Link:
LATimes article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Martin Scorsese
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 2016
    Age 73
    On April 29, 2016, it was announced that Scorsese was in early talks to direct The General, a film based on the life on George Washington.
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    Variety reported in January 2016 that Scorsese is also producing a biopic based on the life of classical pianist Byron Janis, with Peter Glanz writing a screenplay based on Janis' own book, Chopin and Beyond: My Extraordinary Life in Music and the Paranormal.
    More Details Hide Details Paramount Pictures will distribute the film.
  • 2015
    Age 72
    On August 10, 2015, it was announced that Scorsese will direct an adaptation of The Devil in the White City, which will star Leonardo DiCaprio and be written by Billy Ray.
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    In March 2015, it was announced that Scorsese will direct a Mike Tyson biopic.
    More Details Hide Details The film is set to star Oscar-winning actor Jamie Foxx to play Tyson. Foxx mentioned that, "This will be the first boxing movie that Martin Scorsese has done since Raging Bull." The Mike Tyson film that Terence Winter (The Wolf of Wall Street, Boardwalk Empire) is penning will cover the full breadth of his career, reportedly using the aging technology deployed in David Fincher's The Curious Case of Benjamin Button.
  • 2014
    Age 71
    In October 2014, it was announced that Scorsese will produce a yet-to-be-named documentary about the Grateful Dead directed by Amir Bar-Lev.
    More Details Hide Details Surviving members Bob Weir, Mickey Hart, Bill Kreutzmann and Phil Lesh have agreed to new interviews for the film.
    In August 2014, the estate of influential punk rock band The Ramones claimed a biopic of the band was in the works with Scorsese's involvement.
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  • 2013
    Age 70
    His lecture, delivered on April 1, 2013 at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts was titled "Persistence of Vision: Reading the Language of Cinema".
    More Details Hide Details Scorsese has earned praise from many film legends including Ingmar Bergman, Frank Capra, Jean-Luc Godard, Werner Herzog, Elia Kazan, Akira Kurosawa, David Lean, Michael Powell, Satyajit Ray, and François Truffaut. Scorsese is known for his frequent use of slow motion, e.g. Who's That Knocking at My Door (1967), Mean Streets (1973), Taxi Driver (1976), Raging Bull (1980), Goodfellas (1990), and The Wolf of Wall Street (2013). Also known for using freeze frame, such as the opening credits of The King of Comedy (1983), and throughout Goodfellas (1990). Such a shot is also used in Casino (1995) and The Departed (2006). His blonde leading ladies are usually seen through the eyes of the protagonist as angelic and ethereal; they wear white in their first scene and are photographed in slow motion (Cybill Shepherd in Taxi Driver; Cathy Moriarty's white bikini in Raging Bull; Sharon Stone's white minidress in Casino). This may possibly be a nod to director Alfred Hitchcock. Scorsese often uses long tracking shots, as seen in Taxi Driver, Goodfellas, Casino, Gangs of New York, and Hugo. Use of MOS sequences set to popular music or voice-over, often involving aggressive camera movement and/or rapid editing. Scorsese sometimes highlights characters in a scene with an iris, an homage to 1920s silent film cinema (as scenes at the time sometimes used this transition).
    In 2013, the National Endowment for the Humanities selected Scorsese for the Jefferson Lecture, the U.S. federal government's highest honor for achievement in the humanities.
    More Details Hide Details He was the first filmmaker chosen for the honor.
    Scorsese's 2013 film, The Wolf of Wall Street, is an American biographical black comedy based on Jordan Belfort's memoir of the same name.
    More Details Hide Details The screenplay was written by Terence Winter and starred Leonardo DiCaprio as Belfort, along with Jonah Hill and Matthew McConaughey, among others. The Wolf of Wall Street marked the fifth collaboration between Scorsese and DiCaprio and the second between Scorsese and Winter after Boardwalk Empire. The film was released on December 25, 2013. It tells the story of a New York stockbroker, played by DiCaprio, who engages in a large securities fraud case involving corruption on Wall Street, stock manipulation, namely the practice of "pump and dump" and the corporate banking world. DiCaprio was given the award for Best Actor – Motion Picture Musical or Comedy at the 2014 Golden Globe Awards, with the film being nominated for Best Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy as well. Also, The Wolf of Wall Street was nominated for five Academy Awards, including Best Picture, Best Actor for Leonardo DiCaprio, Best Supporting Actor for Jonah Hill, Best Director for Martin Scorsese, and Best Adapted Screenplay for Terence Winter but did not win in any category.
  • 2012
    Age 69
    On September 16, 2012, Scorsese won two Emmy Awards for Outstanding Directing for Nonfiction Programming and Outstanding Nonfiction Special for his work on the documentary George Harrison: Living in the Material World.
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    On February 12, 2012, at the 65th British Academy Film Awards, Scorsese was the recipient of the BAFTA Academy Fellowship Award.
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  • 2011
    Age 68
    In 2011, Scorsese received an honorary doctorate from the National Film School in Lodz.
    More Details Hide Details At the awards ceremony he said, "I feel like I'm a part of this school and that I attended it," paying tribute to the films of Wajda, Munk, Has, Polanski and Skolimowski. King Missile wrote "Martin Scorsese" in his honor.
    On September 18, 2011, at the 63rd Primetime Emmy Awards, Scorsese won the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Directing for a Drama Series for his work on the series premiere of Boardwalk Empire.
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  • 2010
    Age 67
    On January 17, 2010, at the 67th Golden Globe Awards, Scorsese was the recipient of the Golden Globe Cecil B. DeMille Award.
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  • 2008
    Age 65
    On June 17, 2008, the American Film Institute placed two of Scorsese's films on the AFI's 10 Top 10 list: Raging Bull at #1 for the Sports genre and Goodfellas at #2 for the Gangster genre.
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  • 2007
    Age 64
    On September 11, 2007, the Kennedy Center Honors committee, which recognizes career excellence and cultural influence, named Scorsese as one of the honorees for the year.
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    In 2007, Scorsese was honored by the National Italian American Foundation (N.I.A.F.) at the nonprofit's thirty-second Anniversary Gala.
    More Details Hide Details During the ceremony, Scorsese helped launch N.I.A.F.'s Jack Valenti Institute, which provides support to Italian film students in the U.S., in memory of former foundation board member and past president of the Motion Picture Association of America (M.P.A.A.) Jack Valenti. Scorsese received his award from Mary Margaret Valenti, Valenti's widow. Certain pieces of Scorsese's film related material and personal papers are contained in the Wesleyan University Cinema Archives, to which scholars and media experts from around the world may have full access.
    In August 2007, Scorsese was named the second-greatest director of all time in a poll by Total Film magazine, in front of Steven Spielberg and behind Alfred Hitchcock.
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    In 2007, Scorsese was listed among Time magazine's 100 Most Influential People in The World.
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    On the 2007 updated version they moved Goodfellas up to No. 92 on the AFI's 100 Years 100 Movies list (10th Anniversary Edition) and they put Goodfellas at No. 2 on their list of the top 10 gangster films (after The Godfather).
    More Details Hide Details 1991 brought Cape Fear, a remake of a cult 1962 movie of the same name and the director's seventh collaboration with De Niro. Another foray into the mainstream, the film was a stylized thriller taking its cues heavily from Alfred Hitchcock and Charles Laughton's The Night of the Hunter (1955). Cape Fear received a mixed critical reception and was lambasted in many quarters for its scenes depicting misogynistic violence. However, the lurid subject matter gave Scorsese a chance to experiment with visual tricks and effects. The film garnered two Oscar nominations. Earning $80 million domestically, it stood as Scorsese's most commercially successful release until The Aviator (2004), and then The Departed (2006). The film also marked the first time Scorsese used wide-screen Panavision with an aspect ratio of 2.35:1. The Age of Innocence (1993) was a significant departure for Scorsese, a period adaptation of the Edith Wharton novel about the constrictive high society of late-19th century New York. It was highly lauded by critics upon original release, but was a box office bomb, making an overall loss. As noted in Scorsese on Scorsese by editor–interviewer Ian Christie, the news that Scorsese wanted to make a film about a failed 19th-century romance raised many eyebrows among the film fraternity; all the more when Scorsese made it clear that it was a personal project and not a studio for-hire job.
  • 2006
    Age 63
    On February 8, 2006, at the 48th Annual Grammy Awards, Scorsese was awarded the Grammy Award for Best Long Form Music Video for No Direction Home.
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  • 2005
    Age 62
    At a ceremony in Paris, France, on January 5, 2005, Martin Scorsese was awarded the French Legion of Honour in recognition of his contribution to cinema.
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  • FIFTIES
  • 2001
    Age 58
    In 2001, the American Film Institute placed two Scorsese films on their list of the most "heart-pounding movies" in American cinema: Taxi Driver at #22 and Raging Bull at #51.
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  • 1998
    Age 55
    In 1998, the American Film Institute placed three Scorsese films on their list of the greatest movies in America: Raging Bull at #24, Taxi Driver at #47, and Goodfellas at #94.
    More Details Hide Details For their tenth anniversary edition of the list, Raging Bull was moved to #4, Taxi Driver was moved to #52, and Goodfellas was moved to #92.
  • 1997
    Age 54
    In 1997, Scorsese received the AFI Life Achievement Award.
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  • 1994
    Age 51
    In 1994, Scorsese's cameo appearance in the Robert Redford film Quiz Show is remembered for the telling line: "You see, the audience didn't tune in to watch some amazing display of intellectual ability.
    More Details Hide Details They just wanted to watch the money." Since the 1990s, Scorsese has increased his role as a film producer. Scorsese produced a wide range of films, including major Hollywood studio productions (Mad Dog and Glory, Clockers), low-budget independent films (The Grifters, Naked in New York, Grace of My Heart, Search and Destroy, The Hi-Lo Country), and even foreign film (Con gli occhi chiusi). In 1999 Scorsese also produced a documentary on Italian filmmakers titled Il Mio Viaggio in Italia, also known as My Voyage to Italy. The documentary foreshadowed the director's next project, the epic Gangs of New York (2002), influenced by (amongst many others) major Italian directors such as Luchino Visconti and filmed in its entirety at Rome's famous Cinecittà film studios. With a production budget said to be in excess of $100 million, Gangs of New York was Scorsese's biggest and arguably most mainstream venture to date. Like The Age of Innocence, it was set in 19th-century New York, although focusing on the other end of the social scale (and like that film, also starring Daniel Day-Lewis). The film also marked the first collaboration between Scorsese and actor Leonardo DiCaprio, who since then has become a fixture in later Scorsese films. The production was highly troubled, with many rumors referring to the director's conflict with Miramax boss Harvey Weinstein. Despite denials of artistic compromise, Gangs of New York revealed itself to be the director's most conventional film: standard film tropes that the director had traditionally avoided, such as characters existing purely for exposition purposes and explanatory flashbacks, here surfaced in abundance.
  • FORTIES
  • 1990
    Age 47
    In 1990, Scorsese acted in a cameo role as Vincent van Gogh in the film Dreams by Japanese director Akira Kurosawa.
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    After the film was released Roger Ebert, a friend and supporter of Scorsese, named Goodfellas "the best mob movie ever" and is ranked No. 1 on Roger's movie list for 1990, along with Gene Siskel and Peter Travers, the film is widely considered one of the director's greatest achievements.
    More Details Hide Details The film was nominated for six Academy Awards, including Best Picture and Best Director, Scorsese earned his third Best Director nomination for Goodfellas but again lost to a first-time director, Kevin Costner (Dances with Wolves). Joe Pesci earned the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor for his performance in Goodfellas. Scorsese and the film won numerous awards, including five BAFTA Awards, a Silver Lion and more. The American Film Institute put Goodfellas at No. 94 on the AFI's 100 Years 100 Movies list.
  • 1989
    Age 46
    Along with directors Woody Allen and Francis Ford Coppola, in 1989 Scorsese provided one of three segments in the portmanteau film New York Stories, called "Life Lessons".
    More Details Hide Details After a decade of mostly mixed results, gangster epic Goodfellas (1990) was a return to form for Scorsese and his most confident and fully realized film since Raging Bull. De Niro and Joe Pesci offered a virtuoso display of the director's bravura cinematic technique in the film and re-established, enhanced, and consolidated his reputation.
  • 1985
    Age 42
    He then married producer Barbara De Fina in 1985; their marriage ended in divorce as well, in 1991.
    More Details Hide Details Scorsese has been married to Helen Schermerhorn Morris since 1999. They have a daughter, Francesca, who appeared in The Departed and The Aviator. He is based in New York City. Scorsese has commented, "I'm a lapsed Catholic. But I am Roman Catholic; there's no way out of it." In 2010 The Wall Street Journal reported that Scorsese was supporting the David Lynch Foundation's initiative to help 10,000 military veterans overcome posttraumatic stress disorder through Transcendental Meditation, and Scorsese has publicly discussed his own practice of TM. In the 2012 Sight and Sound Polls, held every 10 years to select the greatest films of all time, contemporary directors were asked to select 10 films of their choice. Scorsese, however, picked 12, which are listed below:
  • 1983
    Age 40
    In 1983, Scorsese began work on a long-cherished personal project, The Last Temptation of Christ, based on the 1951 (English translation 1960) novel written by Nikos Kazantzakis.
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  • THIRTIES
  • 1980
    Age 37
    Scorsese was interested in doing a "romantic piece". His friend Jay Cocks gave him the Wharton novel in 1980, suggesting that this should be the romantic piece Scorsese should film as Cocks felt it best represented his sensibility.
    More Details Hide Details In Scorsese on Scorsese he noted that Scorsese, who was strongly drawn to the characters and the story of Wharton's text, wanted his film to be as rich an emotional experience as the book was to him rather than the traditional academic adaptations of literary works. To this aim, Scorsese sought influence from diverse period films that made an emotional impact on him. In Scorsese on Scorsese, he documents influences from films such as Luchino Visconti's Senso and his Il Gattopardo as well as Orson Welles's The Magnificent Ambersons and also Roberto Rossellini's La prise de pouvoir par Louis XIV. Although The Age of Innocence was ultimately different from these films in terms of narrative, story, and thematic concern, the presence of a lost society, of lost values as well as detailed re-creations of social customs and rituals continues the tradition of these films. It came back into the public eye, especially in countries such as the UK and France, but still is largely neglected in North America. The film earned five Academy Award nominations (including for Scorsese for Best Adapted Screenplay), winning the Costume Design Oscar. This was his first collaboration with the Academy Award–winning actor Daniel Day-Lewis, with whom he would work again in Gangs of New York.
  • 1979
    Age 36
    Scorsese was married to actress Isabella Rossellini from 1979 to their divorce in 1983.
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  • 1978
    Age 35
    Another Scorsese-directed documentary, titled American Boy, also appeared in 1978, focusing on Steven Prince, the cocky gun salesman who appeared in Taxi Driver.
    More Details Hide Details A period of wild partying followed, damaging the director's already fragile health. Scorsese also helped provide footage for the documentary Elvis on Tour. In 1977, he directed the Broadway musical The Act, starring Liza Minnelli. By several accounts (Scorsese's included), Robert De Niro practically saved Scorsese's life when he persuaded Scorsese to kick his cocaine addiction to make his highly regarded film Raging Bull. Convinced that he would never make another movie, he poured his energies into making this violent biopic of middleweight boxing champion Jake LaMotta, calling it a Kamikaze method of film-making. The film is widely viewed as a masterpiece and was voted the greatest film of the 1980s by Britain's Sight & Sound magazine. It received eight Oscar nominations, including Best Picture, Best Actor for Robert De Niro, and Scorsese's first for Best Director. De Niro won, as did Thelma Schoonmaker for editing, but Best Director went to Robert Redford for Ordinary People. From this work onwards, Scorsese's films are always labeled as "A Martin Scorsese Picture" on promotional material. Raging Bull, filmed in high contrast black and white, is where Scorsese's style reached its zenith: Taxi Driver and New York, New York had used elements of expressionism to replicate psychological points of view, but here the style was taken to new extremes, employing extensive slow-motion, complex tracking shots, and extravagant distortion of perspective (for example, the size of boxing rings would change from fight to fight).
    However, Scorsese's commitments to other projects delayed the release of the film until 1978.
    More Details Hide Details Other works in 1970s
  • 1976
    Age 33
    Scorsese has been married five times. His first wife was Laraine Marie Brennan; they have a daughter, Catherine. He married the writer Julia Cameron in 1976; they have a daughter (Domenica Cameron-Scorsese, who is an actress and appeared in The Age of Innocence), but the marriage lasted only a year.
    More Details Hide Details The divorce was acrimonious and served as the basis of Cameron's first feature, the dark comedy God's Will, which also starred their daughter, Domenica. Their daughter also had a small role in Cape Fear using the name Domenica Scorsese and has continued to act, write, direct, and produce.
    Taxi Driver won the Palme d'Or at the 1976 Cannes Film Festival, also receiving four Oscar nominations, including Best Picture.
    More Details Hide Details The critical success of Taxi Driver encouraged Scorsese to move ahead with his first big-budget project: the highly stylized musical New York, New York. This tribute to Scorsese's home town and the classic Hollywood musical was a box-office failure. The film was the director's third collaboration with Robert De Niro, co-starring with Liza Minnelli. The film is best remembered today for the title theme song, which was popularized by Frank Sinatra. Although possessing Scorsese's usual visual panache and stylistic bravura, many critics felt its enclosed studio-bound atmosphere left it leaden in comparison with his earlier work. Despite its weak reception, the film is positively regarded by some critics. Richard Brody in The New Yorker wrote: "For Scorsese, a lifelong cinephile, the essence of New York could be found in its depiction in classic Hollywood movies. Remarkably, his backward-looking tribute to the golden age of musicals and noirish romantic melodramas turned out to be one of his most freewheeling and personal films."
  • 1974
    Age 31
    In 1974, actress Ellen Burstyn chose Scorsese to direct her in Alice Doesn't Live Here Anymore, for which she won an Academy Award for Best Actress.
    More Details Hide Details Although well regarded, the film remains an anomaly in the director's early career as it focuses on a central female character. Returning to Little Italy to explore his ethnic roots, Scorsese next came up with Italianamerican, a documentary featuring his parents Charles and Catherine Scorsese. Taxi Driver followed in 1976Scorsese's dark, urban nightmare of one lonely man's slow descent into insanity. The film established Scorsese as an accomplished filmmaker and also brought attention to cinematographer Michael Chapman, whose style tends towards high contrasts, strong colors, and complex camera movements. The film starred Robert De Niro as the troubled and psychotic Travis Bickle. The film co-starred Jodie Foster in a highly controversial role as an underage prostitute, and Harvey Keitel as her pimp, Matthew, called "Sport". Taxi Driver also marked the start of a series of collaborations between Scorsese and writer Paul Schrader, whose influences included the diary of would-be assassin Arthur Bremer and Pickpocket, a film by the French director Robert Bresson. Writer - director Schrader often returns to Bresson's work in films such as American Gigolo, Light Sleeper, and Scorsese's later Bringing Out the Dead. Already controversial upon its release, Taxi Driver hit the headlines again five years later, when John Hinckley, Jr. made an assassination attempt on then-president Ronald Reagan. He subsequently blamed his act on his obsession with Jodie Foster's Taxi Driver character (in the film, De Niro's character, Travis Bickle, makes an assassination attempt on a senator).
  • TWENTIES
  • 1972
    Age 29
    In 1972, Scorsese made the Depression-era exploiter Boxcar Bertha for B-movie producer Roger Corman, who also helped directors such as Francis Ford Coppola, James Cameron, and John Sayles launch their careers.
    More Details Hide Details It was Corman who taught Scorsese that entertaining films could be shot with very little money or time, preparing the young director well for the challenges to come with Mean Streets. Following the film's release, Cassavetes encouraged Scorsese to make the films that he wanted to make, rather than someone else's projects. Championed by influential film critic Pauline Kael, Mean Streets was a breakthrough for Scorsese, De Niro, and Keitel. By now the signature Scorsese style was in place: macho posturing, bloody violence, Catholic guilt and redemption, gritty New York locale (though the majority of Mean Streets was actually shot in Los Angeles), rapid-fire editing and a soundtrack with contemporary music. Although the film was innovative, its wired atmosphere, edgy documentary style, and gritty street-level direction owed a debt to directors Cassavetes, Samuel Fuller and early Jean-Luc Godard.
  • 1967
    Age 24
    In 1967, Scorsese made his first feature-length film, the black and white I Call First, which was later retitled Who's That Knocking at My Door with his fellow students actor Harvey Keitel and editor Thelma Schoonmaker, both of whom were to become long-term collaborators.
    More Details Hide Details This film was intended to be the first of Scorsese's semiautobiographical J. R. Trilogy, which also would have included a later film, Mean Streets. Scorsese became friends with the influential "movie brats" of the 1970s: Brian De Palma, Francis Ford Coppola, George Lucas and Steven Spielberg. It was Brian De Palma who introduced Scorsese to Robert De Niro. During this period he worked as the assistant director and one of the editors on the documentary Woodstock (1970) and met actor–director John Cassavetes, who would also go on to become a close friend and mentor.
  • 1966
    Age 23
    The film does not cover Dylan's entire career; it focuses on his beginnings, his rise to fame in the 1960s, his then-controversial transformation from an acoustic guitar–based musician and performer to an electric guitar–influenced sound and his "retirement" from touring in 1966 following an infamous motorcycle accident.
    More Details Hide Details The film was first presented on television in both the United States (as part of the PBS American Masters series) and the United Kingdom (as part of the BBC Two Arena series) on September 26–27, 2005. A DVD version of the film was released that same month. The film won a Peabody Award and the Grammy Award for Best Long Form Music Video. In addition, Scorsese received an Emmy nomination for it. Scorsese returned to the crime genre with the Boston-set thriller The Departed, based on the Hong Kong police drama Infernal Affairs (which is co-directed by Andrew Lau and Alan Mak). The film continued Scorsese's collaboration streak with Leonardo DiCaprio, and was his first collaboration with Matt Damon, Jack Nicholson, Mark Wahlberg, and Martin Sheen. The Departed opened to widespread critical acclaim, with some proclaiming it as one of the best efforts Scorsese had brought to the screen since 1990s Goodfellas, and still others putting it at the same level as Scorsese's most celebrated classics Taxi Driver and Raging Bull. With domestic box office receipts surpassing, The Departed was Scorsese's highest-grossing film (not accounting for inflation) until 2010s Shutter Island.
    He went on to earn his M.F.A. from NYU's School of the Arts (now known as the Tisch School of the Arts) in 1966, a year after the school was founded.
    More Details Hide Details Scorsese attended New York University's Tisch School of the Arts (B.A., English, 1964; M.F.A., film, 1966) making the short films What's a Nice Girl Like You Doing in a Place Like This? (1963) and It's Not Just You, Murray! (1964). His most famous short of the period is the darkly comic The Big Shave (1967), which features Peter Bernuth. The film is an indictment of America's involvement in Vietnam, suggested by its alternative title Viet '67. Scorsese has mentioned on several occasions that he was greatly inspired in his early days at New York University by his Armenian American film professor Haig P. Manoogian.
  • 1964
    Age 21
    His initial desire to become a priest while attending Cardinal Hayes High School in the Bronx gave way to cinema and consequently, Scorsese enrolled in NYU's University College of Arts and Science, (now known as the College of Arts and Science), where he earned a B.A. in English in 1964.
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  • TEENAGE
  • 1960
    Age 17
    Based on Nikos Kazantzakis's controversial 1960 book, it retold the life of Christ in human rather than divine terms.
    More Details Hide Details Even prior to its release the film caused a massive furor, worldwide protests against its blasphemy effectively turning a low budget independent movie into a media sensation. Most controversy centered on the final passages of the film, which depicted Christ marrying and raising a family with Mary Magdalene in a Satan-induced hallucination while on the cross. Looking past the controversy, The Last Temptation of Christ gained critical acclaim and remains an important work in Scorsese's canon: an explicit attempt to wrestle with the spirituality underpinning his films up until that point. The director went on to receive his second nomination for a Best Director Academy Award (again unsuccessfully, this time losing to Barry Levinson for Rain Man). Other works in 1980s Scorsese made a brief cameo appearance in the film Anna Pavlova (also known as A Woman for All Time), originally intended to be directed by one of his heroes, Michael Powell. This led to a more significant role in Bertrand Tavernier's jazz film Round Midnight. He also made a brief venture into television, directing an episode of Steven Spielberg's Amazing Stories.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1947
    Age 4
    Scorsese has cited Sabu and Victor Mature as his favorite actors during his youth and has spoken of the influence of the 1947 Powell and Pressburger film Black Narcissus, whose innovative techniques later impacted his filmmaking.
    More Details Hide Details Enamored of historical epics in his adolescence, at least two films of the genre, Land of the Pharaohs and El Cid, appear to have had a deep and lasting impact on his cinematic psyche. Scorsese also developed an admiration for neorealist cinema at this time. He recounted its influence in a documentary on Italian neorealism, and commented on how Bicycle Thieves alongside Paisà, Rome, Open City inspired him and how this influenced his view or portrayal of his Sicilian roots. In his documentary, Il Mio Viaggio in Italia, Scorsese noted that the Sicilian episode of Roberto Rossellini's Paisà, which he first saw on television alongside his relatives, who were themselves Sicilian immigrants, made a significant impact on his life. He acknowledges owing a great debt to the French New Wave and has stated that "the French New Wave has influenced all filmmakers who have worked since, whether they saw the films or not." He has also cited filmmakers including Satyajit Ray, Ingmar Bergman, Michelangelo Antonioni, and Federico Fellini as a major influence on his career.
  • 1942
    Born
    Born on November 17, 1942.
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