Mary Elizabeth Bliss
American first lady
Mary Elizabeth Bliss
Mary Elizabeth Taylor Bliss was the daughter of President Zachary Taylor and First Lady Margaret Taylor. She served as White House hostess due to her mother's ill health. On December 8, 1848, Mary married William Wallace Smith Bliss, the future president's secretary. Bliss died in 1853. On July 9, 1850, the Taylor presidency came to an abrupt end when the President died.
Biography
Mary Elizabeth Bliss's personal information overview.
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News
News abour Mary Elizabeth Bliss from around the web
Girls U12 Teams Post Shutout Wins - Patch.com
Google News - almost 6 years
As a dependable sweeper, Mary Bliss aggressively anticipated Chelmsford's passes to clear them from the defensive zone. Playing goalkeeper in the second half, Molly McDonald scooped up Chelmsford's opportunities and got the ball out to her midfielders
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Google News article
Off the hook in Avon: Property owners shouldn't be assessed for interchange ... - The Morning Journal
Google News - almost 6 years
Mary Bliss, who farms land along Detroit Road, joined in with other property owners in the audience with a hearty applause and cheer after Smith's announcement. During a small break, Bliss looked at other property owners and gave an enthusiastic thumbs
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The thyme of her life - phillyBurbs.com
Google News - almost 6 years
At one time, there were sheep and a pig named Mary Bliss, who weighed 1200 pounds. Stevens has planted a number of small gardens around the property. In the front, close to busy Hartford Road, a sage bed blooms with six varieties of that fragrant herb
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Google News article
May 21: The Rapture Meets My 40th Birthday - The Awl
Google News - almost 6 years
But recently I discovered that Mary Bliss Parsons, my ninth great-grandmother and my mom's eighth, beat witchcraft charges—twice—in Northampton, Massachusetts, where her husband Joseph moved the family because Mary couldn't get along with the people
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BU12-1 Crushes Melrose; BU14-1 Battle to Tie - Patch.com
Google News - almost 6 years
To complement the goalkeeping, Mary Bliss and Kayleigh Bishop carried rebounds from the defensive zone to pass the ball to their midfielders. Following a direct kick crushed by Emily Duquette, Jessica Ripley, Stephanie McHatton, and Makayla Calouro
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Google News article
Bayou Playhouse has 'hottest thing on the local stage' - Daily Comet
Google News - almost 6 years
Liam Kraus plays Brick and Mary Bliss Mather plays Maggie the Cat in a scene from the Bayou Playhouse's production of “Cat on a Hot Tin Roof.” The Bayou Playhouse in Lockport has the hottest thing on the local stage right now — Maggie the Cat is still
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LETTER; Bewitching
NYTimes - almost 9 years
To the Editor: Re ''Of Witches and the Wait for Justice,'' by Maura J. Casey (Editorial Notebook, April 13): Kudos to Addie Avery for defending her ancestor Mary Sanford, who was accused of witchcraft. My ancestor Mary Bliss Parsons of Northampton, Mass., was accused in 1675 of bewitching a young woman who had died unexpectedly. The case was
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NYTimes article
WEDDINGS; Ms. Wheeler And Mr. Rukan
NYTimes - over 18 years
Alexandra Wheeler and Thomas Arnold Rukan were married yesterday at the home of the bride's stepfather, William W. Bliss, in Glenbrook, Nev. The Rev. Mary Moore Gaines, an Episcopal minister, officiated. Ms. Wheeler, 37, is keeping her name. She is the director of development for the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York. She graduated from
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NYTimes article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Mary Elizabeth Bliss
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 1909
    Age 84
    Died in 1909.
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  • THIRTIES
  • 1858
    Age 33
    On February 11, 1858, she married again, to Philip Pendelton Dandridge.
    More Details Hide Details They had children. Mary Taylor Bliss Dandridge lived until the age of 85.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1852
    Age 27
    Mary and William Bliss accompanied her widowed mother to Pascagoula, Mississippi, where she lived with another married daughter until her death two years later in 1852.
    More Details Hide Details The following year, William Bliss died of yellow fever contracted in New Orleans. Mary Elizabeth Bliss was a widow at the age of 29.
  • 1850
    Age 25
    On July 9, 1850, the Taylor presidency ended with Zachary Taylor's death.
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  • 1848
    Age 23
    On December 8, 1848, Mary married William Wallace Smith Bliss, an army officer who had served with her father. Zachary Taylor was elected to the presidency in 1848, and was inaugurated in 1849.
    More Details Hide Details He appointed William Bliss as his Presidential Secretary. As his wife declined, Mary Elizabeth Bliss served as First Lady for her father for official White House functions, starting at the age of 22. She and William Bliss were excited about their roles in Washington.
    In 1848, after her father was elected president, Mary Elizabeth married William Wallace Smith Bliss, an army officer who had served with her father.
    More Details Hide Details Taylor appointed William Bliss as Presidential Secretary. At the age of 22, Mary Elizabeth Bliss served as First Lady during her father's presidency, as her mother declined the social role. Her father, mother and husband all died by 1853. Mary Elizabeth Bliss remarried five years later and had a long life. Mary Elizabeth was born as the youngest daughter of five to Margaret Mackall Smith and Zachary Taylor in Louisville, Kentucky, then on the frontier. She also had a younger brother Richard. She and her siblings grew up alternately at their plantation in Louisville and United States Army forts, where her father, a career Army officer, was often in command. Her mother mostly taught the children at home, sometimes with the help of tutors or young officers at forts. In the late 1820s, the family moved to a plantation near Baton Rouge, as her father was purchasing land in Louisiana.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1824
    Born
    Born in 1824.
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