Mary Welsh Hemingway
American journalist
Mary Welsh Hemingway
Mary Welsh Hemingway was an American journalist and the fourth wife (and widow) of Ernest Hemingway. Born in Minnesota, Welsh was a daughter of a lumberman. When she was 32, she married Lawrence Miller Cook, a drama student from Ohio. Their life together was short and they soon separated. After the separation, Mary moved to Chicago and began working at the Chicago Daily News, where she met Will Lang Jr..
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Mary Welsh Hemingway's personal information overview.
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News
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Leroy Dreighton (HEPHZIBAH, Ga.) - The Augusta Chronicle
Google News - over 5 years
Survivors are three sisters, Mary Hemingway, Rosa L. Joe, Philadelphia, PA, Geneva Dreighton, Massachusetts; and an host of nieces, nephews, great nieces and nephews. Williams Funeral Home, 2945 Old Tobacco Road, Hephzibah, GA Sign the guestbook at
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Marty Beckerman's 'The Heming Way' is hilarious - The Baylor Lariat
Google News - over 5 years
Ernest and his wife Mary Hemingway on a safari in Kenya, Africa, Hemingway, who was an avid hunter throughout his life, wrote often of Africa and spoke highly of the hunting opportunities available on the continent. The main criticism of this book,
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Cuba? Why not? - Cuba Headlines
Google News - over 5 years
In How It Was, Mary Hemingway reports that when Earl Wilson of the New York Post wrote reporting someone considered Ernest was shirking his duties as a US citizen by living in Cuba, he replied to Earl: “I always had good luck working in Cuba
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Paris est une fête enrichi par les descendants d'Hemingway - L'Express
Google News - over 5 years
... Hemingway passa en effet son temps à remettre la main à la première version du manuscrit, qui fut publié en 1964 - soit trois ans après son suicide, et après d'"importants amendements de la main des éditeurs, de Mary Hemingway [NB : sa quatrième et
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Ernest Hemingway chi? Il cacciatore? Ah, no, già, lo scrittore - LeiWeb
Google News - over 5 years
Foto courtesy Mary Hemingway Ernest Hemingway era capitato in questo posto sperduto sulla scia della Union Pacific, la compagnia ferroviaria che aveva deciso di sfruttare la bellezza selvaggia della valle per costruire un centro di villeggiatura
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National Gallery to offer a sneak peek of Joan Miro - Washington Post (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
The gallery has collected Miro's work, including a well-known realistic painting “The Farm,” a gift of Mary Hemingway, Ernest's 4th wife. The show is its first exhibition of the Catalan artist. Beginning in September, the gallery will mount several
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Looking back in Fairbanks — July 8 - Fairbanks Daily News-Miner
Google News - over 5 years
Mrs. Mary Hemingway, who has remained in seclusion since her husband's death last Sunday of a gunshot wound in the head, met with four newsmen to clear up what she termed “inaccuracies” in earlier reporting. July 8, 1936 — On the inaugural flight of a
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Bell tolls for Hemingway - DAWN.com
Google News - over 5 years
Mrs Mary Hemingway said that her husband killed himself accidentally at 07:30 local [time] yesterday while cleaning a gun. The coroner said: “There is no indication of foul play. His wife thought it was an accident, and there was no one with Mr
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Fresh claim over role the FBI played in suicide of Ernest Hemingway - The Guardian
Google News - over 5 years
Photograph: Mary Hemingway/AP For five decades, literary journalists, psychologists and biographers have tried to unravel why Ernest Hemingway took his own life, shooting himself at his Idaho home while his wife Mary slept. Some have blamed growing
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HABITATS | UPPER EAST SIDE; '10E, as in Effervescent'
NYTimes - almost 6 years
IN Susan Buckley's apartment on East 83rd Street in Manhattan, amid the conch shells and coral from the Caribbean, the walking sticks capped by Alpine ferrules, the French sleigh bells and the Civil War-era flag, are five guest books testifying to a life well lived. The books, bound with handmade Venetian paper, are filled with scribblings in half
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OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR; Don't Touch 'A Moveable Feast'
NYTimes - over 7 years
BOOKSTORES are getting shipments of a significantly changed edition of Ernest Hemingway's masterpiece, ''A Moveable Feast,'' first published posthumously by Scribner in 1964. This new edition, also published by Scribner, has been extensively reworked by a grandson who doesn't like what the original said about his grandmother, Hemingway's second
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A Hemingway Edits 'Moveable Feast,' Going Easier on Grandma
NYTimes - over 7 years
Besides its tart portraits of F. Scott Fitzgerald and Gertrude Stein, Ernest Hemingway's posthumous memoir of his early days in Paris, ''A Moveable Feast,'' provides a heart-wrenching depiction of marital betrayal. The final chapter, ''There Is Never Any End to Paris,'' is a wistful paean to Hadley Richardson, Hemingway's first wife, whom the
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The Old Man and the Boat
NYTimes - over 11 years
I WENT to Havana earlier this summer partly for the reason that I suspect almost any American without a loved one there would wish to go: to drink in the lost world -- so close, so forbidden to our eyes (at least, mostly forbidden) for nearly half a century. So, yes, I wanted to smoke a Cohiba cigar, an authentic one -- and did. So, yes, I wanted
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Hemingway Bullfight Tale From 1924 Turns Up
NYTimes - over 12 years
Eighty years after they were written, a previously unknown story and a handwritten letter ascribed to Ernest Hemingway have surfaced to stir a literary and legal dispute between people who want to see them published and people who don't. At present, the opponents of publication -- notably the custodians of the Hemingway estate -- are winning,
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Wrong Library
NYTimes - almost 14 years
To the Editor: Re ''To 'Dearest Marlene' From 'Papa'; Hemingway's Letters to Dietrich Are Given to Library'' (Arts pages, April 7): In 1972, the Kennedy family made an arrangement with Mary Hemingway for her husband's manuscripts and correspondence to be housed in the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum in Boston. Why did the Kennedy
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To 'Dearest Marlene' From 'Papa'; Hemingway's Letters to Dietrich Are Given to Library
NYTimes - almost 14 years
''My dearest Marlene: I write this early in the morning, the hour that poor people and soldiers and sailors wake from habit, to send you small letter for if you are lonely or anything.'' The letter was addressed to Marlene Dietrich and written by Ernest Hemingway, one of many he sent to her over their decades of friendship, often affecting the
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Cuba-U.S. Pact on Hemingway Papers
NYTimes - over 14 years
Cuban and American officials formally signed an agreement on Monday to allow American scholars access to a trove of Ernest Hemingway's papers and memorabilia that have been deteriorating in the basement of the author's home outside Havana. The documents include about 3,000 photographs, 9,000 books with margin notes by the author and 3,000 documents
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Havana To Unlock Hemingway Papers
NYTimes - over 14 years
The Cuban government has agreed to allow access to a trove of Ernest Hemingway's papers that experts say promises to illuminate the period in which he wrote some of his most significant works. The collection, deteriorating amid rifles and stuffed African game heads in the basement of Hemingway's home outside Havana, includes 3,000 letters and
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Mary Welsh Hemingway
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 1986
    Age 77
    Died on November 26, 1986.
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  • 1976
    Age 67
    In 1976, she wrote her autobiography, How It Was.
    More Details Hide Details Further biographical details of Mary Welsh Hemingway can be found in the numerous Hemingway biographies and also in The Hemingway Women
  • THIRTIES
  • 1946
    Age 37
    In August 1946, she had a miscarriage due to an ectopic pregnancy. Mary lived with Ernest in Cuba and, after 1959, in Ketchum, Idaho. After Ernest's suicide in 1961, Mary acted as his literary executor, and was responsible for the publication of A Moveable Feast and other posthumous works.
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  • 1945
    Age 36
    In 1945, Mary Welsh divorced Noel Monks, and in March 1946, she married Ernest Hemingway, the ceremony taking place in Cuba.
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  • 1944
    Age 35
    It was also during the war years that she married Australian journalist Noel Monks. In 1944 she met Ernest Hemingway in London and they became intimate.
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  • 1940
    Age 31
    After the fall of France in 1940, Welsh returned to London to cover the events of the War.
    More Details Hide Details She also attended and reported on the press conferences of Winston Churchill. Mary made an accusation of plagiarism against several fellow journalists, including Andy Rooney, although the accusations were proven false.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1938
    Age 29
    Born in Minnesota, Welsh was a daughter of a lumberman. In 1938, she married Lawrence Miller Cook, a drama student from Ohio.
    More Details Hide Details Their life together was short and they soon separated. After the separation, Mary moved to Chicago and began working at the Chicago Daily News, where she met Will Lang Jr.. The two formed a fast friendship and worked together on several assignments. A career move presented itself during a vacation trip to London, when Mary started a new job at the London Daily Express. The position soon brought her assignments in Paris during the years preceding World War II.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1908
    Born
    Born on April 5, 1908.
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Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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