Mary Harris Jones
Irish-born American labor and community organizer
Mary Harris Jones
Mary Harris "Mother" Jones was a American schoolteacher and dressmaker who became a prominent labor and community organizer, who helped coordinate major strikes and co-founded the Industrial Workers of the World. She worked as a teacher and dressmaker but after her husband and four children all died of yellow fever and her workshop was destroyed in a fire in 1871 she began working as an organizer for the Knights of Labor and the United Mine Workers union.
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Mary Harris Jones's personal information overview.
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Virginia D. Baker - Paducah Sun
Google News - over 5 years
She was preceded in death by her husband, Gilbert Baker; one grandson, Derrick Neal; one sister, Mary Jones; and one brother, Dewey Jones. Her parents were George Jones and Rose Sellars Jones. Funeral services will be at 1 pm Thursday, September 1,
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Velina K. Jones -- Orangeburg - The Times and Democrat
Google News - over 5 years
... Jessie Jamison; a loving friend, Queenie Aiken of Orangeburg; several aunts, Annie M. Ross, Joella Gladden and Aldonia Sansom; sisters-in-law, Marie Kirkland, Leola Heatley and Calvin (Mary) Jones; and a host of other relatives and friends
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Hats and Tea Make for a Perfect Afternoon at the Governor Warner Mansion - Patch.com
Google News - over 5 years
A master tea blender for 10 years, Mary Jones of Farmington provided recommendations for brewing tea, and talked about her personal tea blends. Jones created the Governor Warner Mansion tea that is sold as a fundraiser for the museum
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Mitzi Holt's story of survival - WVLT
Google News - over 5 years
(WVLT) -- Thirty-one years-ago Mitzi Holt was a happy 15-year-old in Morristown walking to her mom's surprise birthday party with her best friend, 16-year-old Mary Jones. But everything changed that July day, when she met Randy Lee May
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Family fears for missing Burnley grandad - Burnley and Pendle Citizen
Google News - over 5 years
His disappearance has left his wife of 52 years, Mary Jones, distraught. Mrs Jones, 74, said: “I just want people to tell him to come home because I miss him very much. We do everything together. “I'm that worried I can't get to bed at night
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Fountains at Raintree: Residents praise maintenance-provided lifestyle - Kansas City Star
Google News - over 5 years
Mary Jones markets Fountains at Raintree for Reece & Nichols Realtors and said the community's newly designed Bayfield floor plan has been a popular choice for homeowners. A custom-built home is in the finishing stages and available to view
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Flint family attends seventh straight Back to the Bricks - The Flint Journal - MLive.com
Google News - over 5 years
He and Mary Jones, 39, haven't missed a Back to the Bricks yet. They're one of many families watching today's rolling cruise that have taken part in the auto extravaganza every year since the event was founded. They roamed the seventh annual car
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JCC Supes Will Ditch Membership to International Sustainability Group - Williamsburg Yorktown Daily
Google News - over 5 years
Board Chairman Mary Jones first requested that the county withdraw from ICLEI: Local Governments for Sustainability in June. Board member Jim Kennedy requested in the interim that the Board look at all the various groups the county has membership with
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JCC Supes Share Thoughts on Tree Preservation, Timbering and More - Williamsburg Yorktown Daily
Google News - over 5 years
Board Chairman Mary Jones said she “would be uncomfortable moving forward [on a decision] without getting input from [affected] property owners.” Supervisor Jim Kennedy said he had heard from his constituents and several of them were concerned about
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golf briefs - Las Vegas Review-Journal
Google News - over 5 years
A three-way tie for the second place included Mitch and Cody Jones, accompanied by parents Don and Mary Jones; Christian Begin and Easton Jensen, who played with parents Jeff and Michelle Jensen; and juniors Autumn Schlemmer and Taryn Mayer with
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Honor Roll: Princeton Middle, Princeton High - TheHerald
Google News - over 5 years
Grade 9 - Brenna Bizzell, Jasmine Bombard, Carson Braswell, Kaytlin Casey, Samantha Casey, Megan Coates, Matthew Grantham, Joel Hines, Mary Jones, Alexis Juarez, Erin Wagner and Julia Worley. Grade 10 - Hannah Langdon, Lane Dougherty, Quinn Dougherty,
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Mary Jones - Paducah Sun
Google News - over 5 years
CADIZ — Mary E. Jones, 87, of Cadiz died Monday at Jennie Stuart Medical Center in Hopkinsville. Mrs. Jones was a member of Caldwell Blue Spring Baptist Church and a homemaker. She was is survived by two sons, Charles W. Jones and Kenneth W. Jones,
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JCC Will Look at All of County's Memberships, Not Just Environmental One - Williamsburg Yorktown Daily
Google News - over 5 years
This comes after Board of Supervisors Chairman Mary Jones' initial suggestion that James City to longer be a part of International Council for Local Environmental Initiatives, or ICLEI, at the June 14 board meeting. She again requested to end the
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McGlennon passes on resignation pitch - Virginia Gazette
Google News - over 5 years
If McGlennon wins in Roberts, and Carlton Stockton upends Mary Jones in Berkeley District, Democrats would hold a 3-1 majority. A temporary supervisor would then be appointed in Jamestown. The only Republican guaranteed a seat on the board is Jim
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Partnerships to speed up park development - Charlotte Observer
Google News - over 5 years
Lincoln Heights residents, from left, Mary Cherry, Willie Gardner and Mary Jones join Ed Schweitzer with Partners For Parks at a news conference announcing park plans. Robert Lahser - rlahser@charlotteobserver.com To donate or to get
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Enviro agenda as conspiracy - Virginia Gazette
Google News - over 5 years
Chair Mary Jones recently questioned the county's membership in Local Governments for Sustainability, an international consortium of local governments committed to sustainability. Jones said she has been contacted by citizens worried
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Mary Harris Jones
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 1930
    Age 92
    Mary Harris Jones died in Silver Spring, Maryland at the age of 93 on 30 November 1930.
    More Details Hide Details She is buried in the Union Miners Cemetery in Mount Olive, Illinois, alongside miners who died in the 1898 Battle of Virden. She called these miners, killed in strike-related violence, "her boys." In 1932, about 15,000 Illinois mine workers gathered on Mount Olive to protest against the United Mine Workers, which soon became the Progressive Mine Workers of America. Convinced that they had acted in the spirit of Mother Jones, the miners decided to place a proper headstone on her grave. By 1936, the miners had saved up more than $16,000 and were able to purchase "eighty tons of Minnesota pink granite, with bronze statues of two miners flanking a twenty-foot shaft featuring a bas-relief of Mother Jones at its center." On 11 October 1936, also known as Miners' Day, an estimated 50,000 people arrived at Mother Jones's grave to see the new grave stone and memorial. Since then, October 11 is not only known as Miners' Day but is also referred to and celebrated on Mount Olive as "Mother Jones's Day."
    She celebrated her self-proclaimed 100th birthday there on 1 May 1930 and was filmed making a statement for a newsreel.
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  • 1925
    Age 87
    In 1925, Charles A. Albert, publisher of the fledgling Chicago Times, won a $350,000 judgment against Jones.
    More Details Hide Details Jones remained a union organizer for the UMW into the 1920s and continued to speak on union affairs almost until she died. She released her own account of her experiences in the labor movement as The Autobiography of Mother Jones (1925). During her later years, Jones lived with her friends Walter and Lillie May Burgess on their farm in what is now Adelphi, Maryland.
  • 1924
    Age 86
    By 1924, Jones was in court again, this time facing charges of libel, slander, and sedition.
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  • 1913
    Age 75
    Martial law in the area was declared and rescinded twice before Jones was arrested on 13 February 1913 and brought before a military court.
    More Details Hide Details Accused of conspiring to commit murder among other charges, she refused to recognize the legitimacy of her court martial. She was sentenced to twenty years in the state penitentiary. During house arrest at Mrs. Carney's Boarding House, she acquired a dangerous case of pneumonia. After 85 days of confinement, her release coincided with Indiana Senator John Worth Kern's initiation of a Senate investigation into the conditions in the local coal mines. Mary Lee Settle describes Jones at this time in her 1978 novel The Scapegoat. Several months later, she helped organize coal miners in Colorado. Once again she was arrested, served some time in prison, and was escorted from the state in the months prior to the Ludlow massacre. After the massacre, she was invited to meet face-to-face with the owner of the Ludlow mine, John D. Rockefeller, Jr. The meeting prompted Rockefeller to visit the Colorado mines and introduce long-sought reforms.
  • 1912
    Age 74
    During the Paint Creek-Cabin Creek strike of 1912 in West Virginia, Mary Jones arrived in June 1912, speaking and organizing despite a shooting war between United Mine Workers members and the private army of the mine owners.
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  • 1903
    Age 65
    In 1903, Jones organized children who were working in mills and mines to participate in a "Children's Crusade", a march from Kensington, Philadelphia to Oyster Bay, New York, the hometown of President Theodore Roosevelt with banners demanding "We want to go to school and not the mines!"
    More Details Hide Details As Mother Jones noted, many of the children at union headquarters were missing fingers and had other disabilities, and she attempted to get newspaper publicity for the bad conditions experienced by children working in Pennsylvania. However, the mill owners held stock in essentially all of the newspapers. When the newspaper men informed her that they could not publish the facts about child labor because of this, she remarked "Well, I've got stock in these little children and I'll arrange a little publicity." Permission to see President Roosevelt was denied by his secretary, and it was suggested that Jones address a letter to the president requesting a visit with him. Even though Mother Jones wrote a letter asking for a meeting, she never received an answer. Though the president refused to meet with the marchers, the incident brought the issue of child labor to the forefront of the public agenda. The 2003 non-fiction book Kids on Strike! described Jones's Children's Crusade in detail.
  • FIFTIES
  • 1897
    Age 59
    The first reference to her in print as Mother Jones was in 1897.
    More Details Hide Details In 1901, workers in Pennsylvania's silk mills went on strike. Many of them were young female workers demanding to be paid adult wages. The 1900 census had revealed that one sixth of American children under the age of sixteen were employed. John Mitchell, the president of the UMWA, brought Mother Jones to north-east Pennsylvania in the months of February and September to encourage unity among striking workers. To do so, she encouraged the wives of the workers to organize into a group that would wield brooms, beat on tin pans, and shout "join the union!" She felt that wives had an important role to play as the nurturers and motivators of the striking men, but not as fellow workers. She claimed that the young girls working in the mills were being robbed and demoralized. The rich were denying these children the right to go to school in order to be able to pay for their own children's college tuitions.
  • THIRTIES
  • 1877
    Age 39
    Her political views may have been influenced by the 1877 railroad strike, Chicago's labor movement, and the Haymarket riot and depression of 1886.
    More Details Hide Details Active as an organizer and educator in strikes throughout the country at the time, she was involved particularly with the UMW and the Socialist Party of America. As a union organizer, she gained prominence for organizing the wives and children of striking workers in demonstrations on their behalf. She was termed "the most dangerous woman in America" by a West Virginian district attorney, Reese Blizzard, in 1902, at her trial for ignoring an injunction banning meetings by striking miners. "There sits the most dangerous woman in America", announced Blizzard. "She comes into a state where peace and prosperity reign... crooks her finger and twenty thousand contented men lay down their tools and walk out." Jones was ideologically separated from many of the other female activists of the pre-Nineteenth Amendment days due to her aversion to female suffrage. She was quoted as saying that "you don't need the vote to raise hell!" Her opposition to women taking an active role in politics was based on her belief that the neglect of motherhood was a primary cause of juvenile delinquency. She became known as a charismatic and effective speaker throughout her career. A passionate public speaker, she would liven up her rhetoric with real and folk-tale characters and humor-ridden methods to rile the crowd, making use of profanity, name-calling, and wit. Occasionally she would include props, visual aids, and dramatic stunts for effect. Her oratory usually involved the relating of some personal tale in which she invariably "showed up" one form of authority or another.
  • 1871
    Age 33
    Then, four years later, she lost her home, shop, and possessions in the Great Chicago Fire of 1871.
    More Details Hide Details This huge fire destroyed many homes and shops. Jones, like many others, helped rebuild the city. According to her autobiography, this led to her joining the Knights of Labor. She started organizing strikes. At first the strikes and protests were a horrific failure and usually ended with the police shooting at and killing numerous protesters. The Haymarket Riot of 1886 and the fear of anarchism and upheaval incited by union organizations resulted in the demise of the Knights of Labor. Once the Knights ceased to exist, Mary Jones became involved mainly with the United Mine Workers. She frequently led UMW strikers in picketing and encouraged striking workers to stay on strike when management brought in strike-breakers and militias. She strongly believed that "working men deserved a wage that would allow women to stay home to care for their kids." Around this time, strikes were getting better organized and started to produce greater results, such as better pay for the workers.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1867
    Age 29
    There were two turning points in her life. The first, and most tragic one, was the loss of her husband George and their four children, three girls and a boy (all under the age of five) in 1867, during a yellow fever epidemic in Memphis.
    More Details Hide Details After that tragedy, she returned to Chicago to begin another dressmaking business.
    Jones worked as a teacher and dressmaker, but after her husband and four children all died of yellow fever in 1867 and her dress shop was destroyed in the Great Chicago Fire of 1871, she began working as an organizer for the Knights of Labor and the United Mine Workers union.
    More Details Hide Details From 1897, at about 60 years of age, she was known as Mother Jones. In 1902 she was called "the most dangerous woman in America" for her success in organizing mine workers and their families against the mine owners. In 1903, to protest the lax enforcement of the child labor laws in the Pennsylvania mines and silk mills, she organized a children's march from Philadelphia to the home of President Theodore Roosevelt in New York. Mother Jones magazine, established in 1970, is named for her.
  • 1861
    Age 23
    After tiring of her assumed profession, she moved first to Chicago and then to Memphis, where in 1861 she married George E. Jones, a member and organizer of the National Union of Iron Moulders, which later became the International Molders and Foundry Workers Union of North America, which represented workers specialized in building and repairing steam engines, mills, and other manufactured goods.
    More Details Hide Details Mary decided to leave the teaching profession and eventually opened a dress shop in Memphis on the eve of the Civil War.
  • 1859
    Age 21
    She became a teacher in a convent in Monroe, Michigan, on 31 August 1859.
    More Details Hide Details She was paid eight dollars per month, but the school was described as a "depressing place".
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1837
    Born
    Mary Harris Jones was born on the north side of the city of Cork, Ireland, the daughter of Roman Catholic tenant farmers Richard Harris and Ellen (née Cotter) Harris. Her exact date of birth is uncertain; she was baptized on 1 August 1837.
    More Details Hide Details Mary Harris and her family were victims of the Great Famine, as were many other Irish families. This famine drove more than a million families, including the Harrises, to emigrate to North America. Due to the deaths from starvation and the massive emigration, Ireland's population fell approximately 20-25%. Mary was a teenager when her family emigrated to Canada. In Canada (and later in the United States), the Harris family were victims of discrimination due to their immigrant status as well as their Catholic religion. Mary received an education in Toronto at the Toronto Normal School, which was tuition free and even paid a stipend to each student of one dollar per week for every semester completed. So she was not only studying at a school for free and earning her degree; she was getting paid to do so. At the age of twenty-three, she moved to the United States.
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