Mary Livingstone
American actor
Mary Livingstone
For the wife of explorer David Livingstone see Mary Livingstone Mary Livingstone Mary Livingstone circa 1940.
Biography
Mary Livingstone's personal information overview.
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News
News abour Mary Livingstone from around the web
Strike-hit meat plant remains open in spite of closure threat - Belfast Telegraph
Google News - over 5 years
"I hope they don't close the factory," said pensioner Mary Livingstone. "The shirt factory, Desmonds, closed and we've lost jobs at the hospital. Omagh has got bigger and yet the work has got scarcer." John Quinn criticised managers at Omagh Meats for
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Google News article
vintage TV shows released on DVD - Deseret News
Google News - over 5 years
... with hilarious characters and mostly just reacted to their wisecracks and shenanigans — and with Eddie "Rochester" Anderson, Dennis Day and Don Wilson, and sometimes Mel Blanc and Benny's wife Mary Livingstone, the results were often hilarious
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Google News article
WGTD Radio Theater to broadcast 50th production - Journal Times
Google News - almost 6 years
The usual gang of regulars will include Mary Livingstone (Carolyn Recker), Don Wilson (Don Jensen) and Phil Harris (Jim Meyer). Gateway Technical College President Bryan Albrecht will have a cameo appearance as Jack Benny's special guest
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F.Y.I.; The Origins of That Famous Carnegie Hall Joke
NYTimes - about 7 years
Practice, Mr. Benny Q.Did Jack Benny invent the joke ''How do you get to Carnegie Hall?'' whose punch line is ''Practice, practice, practice''? A. Jack Benny (1894-1974), the vaudeville, radio and television comedian, originally trained to be a violinist, and often used a squeaky violin as a prop in his routines. The Carnegie Hall joke would seem
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NYTimes article
COVER STORY; A Wry Rock Star Plays His Sweeter Self
NYTimes - over 15 years
THE roads to television stardom are many and tortuous, but one particular pathway is relatively well worn: take a successful entertainer and place him or her in a scripted, punch-line-filled simulacrum of his or her show-business-centered life. The formula has worked again and again, from ''The Jack Benny Show'' and ''Make Room for Daddy''
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NYTimes article
JERSEY FOOTLIGHTS; Close Your Eyes; Open Your Ears
NYTimes - over 17 years
Jack Benny will join the special guests this week at the 24th annual Friends of Old-Time Radio Convention in Newark. Actually, it will be Will Jordan, an impersonator, attending as Benny and Ed Sullivan, along with Joan Benny, daughter of Jack Benny and Mary Livingstone, and several dozen stars, producers, singers and announcers. Old-time radio is
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NYTimes article
TELEVISION; Decent but Cranky the Fourth Time Around
NYTimes - over 19 years
DURING LUCILLE BALL'S final years as a television star, even her most devoted fans winced at her pratfalls and scatterbrained coquettishness. Some of Jack Benny's long-running shtick, particularly his relationship with his ''girlfriend,'' Mary Livingstone, wore thin by the 1960's. Even Michael Landon, in his last series or two, could have used a
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NYTimes article
Review/Television; Jack Benny Depicted As Comic Prince? Well!
NYTimes - over 24 years
In what could serve as a handy supplement to "Jack Benny: The Radio and Television Work," published last year by Harper Perennial in conjunction with an exhibition at the Museum of Television and Radio in New York, Home Box Office is offering an hourlong documentary called "Jack Benny: Comedy in Bloom." It makes its debut tonight at 10. As perhaps
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NYTimes article
MARY LIVINGSTONE, RADIO STAR WITH HUSBAND, JACK BENNY
NYTimes - over 33 years
Mary Livingstone, the widow of Jack Benny, who for decades on radio and television served as her husband's comedic foil, died after a short illness Thursday at her home in Holmby Hills, near Los Angeles. She was 77 years old. For nearly 50 years Miss Livingstone was married to the taciturn comedian, who was famous for his supposed stinginess and
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NYTimes article
MARY LIVINGSTONE, RADIO ACTRESS
NYTimes - over 33 years
Mary Livingstone, the widow of Jack Benny, who for decades on radio and television served as her husband's comedic foil, died after a short illness yesterday at her home in Holmby Hills near Los Angeles. She was 77 years old. Because of her stage name, Miss Livingstone seemed to be single, despite nearly 50 years of marriage to the taciturn
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NYTimes article
BRIEFING
NYTimes - over 34 years
Koch's Aide on Stage Mayor Koch plans to be in the audience tomorrow night at the Quaigh Theater when his special assistant for cultural affairs, Mary Tierney, plays Mary Livingstone in ''Livingstone and Sechele.'' The jump from politics to the stage has not been a long one for Miss Tierney, who worked at the Quaigh before joining the Mayor's staff
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NYTimes article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Mary Livingstone
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 1983
    Age 77
    After writing a biography of her husband, Mary Livingstone — whose surname is often misspelled without the 'e', as with her star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame for her contribution to radio — died from heart disease at her home in Holmby Hills on June 30, 1983, aged 78, hours after receiving a visit from then-First Lady Nancy Reagan.
    More Details Hide Details Her daughter Joan noted that the two women enjoyed a private manicure appointment. "The doctor said it was a heart attack", Joan wrote, "but I have always felt she just gradually faded out of life." Mary Livingstone is interred beside her husband in the Hillside Memorial Park Cemetery in Culver City, California. Notes
  • FIFTIES
  • 1959
    Age 53
    Her final performance was as a mouse spoof of herself in The Mouse That Jack Built, a Merrie Melodies cartoon from 1959 lampooning the radio show.
    More Details Hide Details George Burns revealed in his memoir Gracie: A Love Story (1988) that he and his wife and performing partner Gracie Allen loved Jack Benny, but merely tolerated Mary, whom they disliked. Lucille Ball felt the same way, referring to Mary as a "hard-hearted Hannah". Livingstone's relationship with their adopted daughter, Joan, was strained. In Sunday Nights at Seven (1990), her father's unfinished memoir that she completed with her own recollections, Joan Benny revealed she rarely felt close to her mother, and the two often argued: She had so many good qualities — her sense of humor, her generosity, her loyalty to her friends. She had a famous, successful, and adoring husband; she had famous, interesting, and amusing friends; she lived in luxury; she was a celebrity in her own right. In short, she had everything a woman could possibly want. When I think of her it's with sadness because I wish she could have enjoyed it all more.
  • 1958
    Age 52
    Livingstone made few appearances on the television version - mostly in filmed episodes - and finally retired from show business after her close friend Gracie Allen did so in 1958.
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  • FORTIES
  • 1954
    Age 48
    Never very comfortable as a performer despite her success, Livingstone's stage fright became so acute by the time the Benny show was moving toward television that she rarely appeared on the radio show in its final season, 1954-55.
    More Details Hide Details When she did appear, the Bennys' adopted daughter, Joan, occasionally acted as a stand-in for her mother, or Mary's lines were read in rehearsals by Jack's script secretary, Jeanette Eyman, while Livingstone's prerecorded lines were played during live broadcasts.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1905
    Born
    Born in 1905.
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