Matt Gonzalez
American politician
Matt Gonzalez
Matthew Edward Gonzalez is an American politician, lawyer, and activist prominent in San Francisco politics. He currently serves as chief attorney in the San Francisco Public Defender's office. Gonzalez was a member and president of San Francisco County's Board of Supervisors. He was also one of the first Green Party candidates elected to public office in the San Francisco Bay area.
Biography
Matt Gonzalez's personal information overview.
{{personal_detail.supertitle}}
{{personal_detail.title}}
{{personal_detail.title}}
Relationships
View family, career and love interests for Matt Gonzalez
Show More Show Less
News
News abour Matt Gonzalez from around the web
iPhone 7 concept imagines a game-changing dual camera system
Yahoo News - 12 months
One of the more intriguing features that we might see with this year's iPhone 7 is a dual camera setup that features both a standard wide-angle lens camera and a secondary telephoto lens that would be capable to capturing zoomed-in pictures and videos.  MacRumors' videographer Matt Gonzalez has put together  a terrific concept video that shows us just how cool it would be to have such a dual camera system on your iPhone and he draws on actual Apple patents to give us a realistic look at how it might be implemented. MUST SEE:  Galaxy S7 edge pitted against iPhone 6s Plus in most extensive comparison video yet In his concept, Gonzalez shows how Apple could let you see two different views
Article Link:
Yahoo News article
'Lighting Strikes: 18 Poets. 18 Artists.' at Dolby Chadwick Gallery, San Francisco
Huffington Post - about 1 year
The exhibition Lightning Strikes: 18 poets.18 artists. -- at Dolby Chadwick Gallery through January 30th -- has its roots in the idea of ekphrasis: poetry that describes or responds to a work of art. Conceived and organized by gallery director Lisa Dolby Chadwick, the exhibition isn't about artists creating illustrations of poems or even about collaboration. Instead, by generating what she characterizes as "thoughtful pairings" Chadwick wanted to see if she could make "lightning strike" in the form of flashes of inspiration. Coming from her conviction that poetry is not as widely represented or supported as it should be in contemporary culture, Chadwick wanted bring together a diverse group of poets and artists to open up a fresh conversation about how the verbal and the visual can interact with each other. Charlie Pendergast, one of the participating poets, describes the project as being "conceived in that fortunate space where two passions meet to willingly inspire each other." Li ...
Article Link:
Huffington Post article
Wayne Thiebaud: <i>Memory Mountains</i>
Huffington Post - over 3 years
Veteran artist Wayne Thiebaud -- who will turn 93 on November 15th -- isn't slowing down a bit. His current one-man show at the Paul Thiebaud Gallery, Memory Mountains, consists of 31 paintings and 17 works on paper and fills both floors of the gallery. The exhibition is, among other things, a tribute to Thiebaud's dedication to his craft: several of the canvases on view have been heavily worked and re-worked for periods of up to 10 years and some of the works date back to the 1960s. Gallery Director Kelly Purcell chats with Wayne Thiebaud Photo by Morgan Schlauffler In a 2010 New York Times interview Thiebaud acknowledged that he often paints outdoors -- to "fortify his focus" -- while admitting that plain air painting did not allow him the flexibility that his imaginative approach to subject matter requires. "But with me," he noted, "it's about remembrance -- sketching certain types of reflected patterns, different kinds of lighting, then conjuring it up with your memory and i ...
Article Link:
Huffington Post article
Cutting through the rhetoric about 8 Washington
San Francisco Chronicle - over 3 years
The back of the building would climb to 12 stories, its closest neighbor a 22-story apartment slab directly to the west. Visually, it would strengthen the edge of the Embarcadero, a promenade that the city still turns its back to for most of the stretch from Market Street to Fisherman's Wharf. The raising of height limits for a specific project is described in a ballot handbook argument as "an attempted end-run around a half-century of an open and transparent citizen planning process" by such high-visibility progressives as Matt Gonzalez and Aaron Peskin - even though 8 Washington was approved after contentious hearings at the Planning Commission and the Board of Supervisors. [...] though height limits have been raised for single buildings in the past generation, including the Giants' ballpark and the 14-story City College of San Francisco building on the edge of Chinatown, those projects have tended to be for public use.
Article Link:
San Francisco Chronicle article
Span named for Willie Brown, but no signs may go up
San Francisco Chronicle - over 3 years
The Legislature's overwhelming approval of a resolution renaming the western span of the Bay Bridge in honor of former San Francisco Mayor and Assembly Speaker Willie Brown is no guarantee the signs will actually go up. Would the governor take such a public slap at one of the state's senior Democrats - not to mention the NAACP, main backer of the renaming - over a largely symbolic measure? The governor's office isn't saying "yes," but it isn't saying "no," either - a spokesman declined to say anything about a state Senate vote Thursday giving the measure final approval. Board of Supervisors President David Chiu, who just announced he is running for the Assembly, was decidedly more noncommittal, saying he hadn't received many calls or e-mails on the subject and was "looking forward" to hearing from his constituents. The renaming resolution, which covers the bridge from Yerba Buena Island to San Francisco, was co-authored by San Francisco Democratic Assemblyman Phil Ting and was a to ...
Article Link:
San Francisco Chronicle article
Lisa Chau: Interview With Critically Acclaimed Author, Alan Kaufman
Huffington Post - over 3 years
Alan Kaufman, the Bronx-born son of a French-Jewish Holocaust survivor and a recovering alcoholic with 23 years of sobriety, is author of the critically acclaimed memoirs Jew Boy and Drunken Angel and a novel, Matches, based upon his experiences as a former Israeli combat soldier. Kaufman has also edited three ground-breaking anthologies: The Outlaw Bible of American Poetry, The Outlaw Bible Of American Literature (Co-edited with Barney Rosset) and The Outlaw Bible Of American Essays. Kaufman's writings, like his anthologies, are subversive articulations of extreme outsiderness and existentially affirm marginality as an experience common to the contemporary human condition. At the heart of his work lies the belief that all of human society's ills, from the post-war era to the present -- and including numerous genocides, from Cambodia to Rwanda -- lies in its failure to meaningfully confront and address the implications and horrors of what occurred in the Holocaust. His books h ...
Article Link:
Huffington Post article
Bay Area charitable events, May 19
San Francisco Chronicle - almost 4 years
GlideThe Rev. Cecil Williams and his wife, poet Janice Mirikitani, will be honored at this Giants game during the Celebrate50 anniversary tribute that includes a lower box ticket, pregame party, private performance by the Glide Ensemble and Change Band, and a limited-edition bobblehead of Williams and his wife. 4:45 p.m. May 24. HealthRight 360The Black-Tie &amp; Tie-Dye Gala features a cocktail reception, silent auction, dinner-dance and live auction in support of the 40th anniversary of this nonprofit's (Walden House and the Haight Ashbury Free Clinic) Rock Medicine program. 6 p.m. May 31. Patrick J. Dowling Irish LibraryThe Mad Hatter Tea Party features an old-fashioned afternoon of tea, sandwiches and treats, as well as a prize for the best hat, in support of one of the nation's few libraries dedicated to Irish language, culture and literature. 1 p.m. June 2. Headlands Center for the ArtsThe 2013 Benefit Art Auction features a cocktail buffet, pop-up shops by local artisans, ent ...
Article Link:
San Francisco Chronicle article
S.F. progressives badly need a leader
San Francisco Chronicle - over 4 years
S.F. progressives badly need a leader [...] we see them booing women who work to stop domestic violence. The progressives need a wake-up call and a strong leader. Because right now it looks as if their only commitment is to whatever is politically expedient. Although his denials and obfuscations were right out of the domestic abuse playbook, true believers repeated them dutifully: it's just a bruise; his wife stands by her husband; advocates against domestic abuse are political tools. [...] it concluded with that ugly public hearing when the progressive supporters, once forces of empowerment for women, booed those who offer comfort and shelter to victims of domestic violence. Rather than make the media circuit and dispute the rumors, he threatened to sue the woman to keep her quiet. In 2003 then Supervisor Matt Gonzalez, running as a Green Party candidate, narrowly lost to Gavin Newsom for mayor despite being outspent nearly 10-1. [...] after her exercise i ...
Article Link:
San Francisco Chronicle article
Olague struggles to find her bearings
San Francisco Chronicle - over 4 years
Olague struggles to find her bearings When District Five Supervisor Ross Mirkarimi was elected sheriff in November, picking a replacement set off a frenzy of speculation, lobbying and insider politicking in City Hall. Candidates lined up to petition Mayor Ed Lee and worked the back channels to get the coveted job. [...] in January, Lee appointed Planning Commission President Christina Olague. [...] making her the winner of the be-careful-what-you-wish-for sweepstakes. [...] it's been rough watching Olague learn the job on the fly. Tuesday's contentious discussion on reappointing Planning Commissioner Mike Antonini resulted in the decision being postponed. [...] afterward, Supervisor Sean Elsbernd and board President David Chiu could be seen having a heated, finger-pointing debate on the side of the chamber. Olague came into office with progressive credentials, but she also supported Lee, a moderate, in his bid for mayor. When she voted in favor of a new ho ...
Article Link:
San Francisco Chronicle article
John Seed: Remembering William Theophilus Brown (1919-2012)
Huffington Post - almost 5 years
At the age of 11 William "Theophilus" Brown shook the hand of the artist Grant Wood, the creator of "American Gothic," who was awarding him third prize in a juried art competition. "He (Wood) was amazed to see this kid walking up the aisle," Brown later recalled. In the long and richly artistic life that followed Brown racked up interesting life experiences, meeting many more "gods and idols" along the way. Part of Brown's success in life seems to have stemmed from always know just what to do or say. One day in Europe, for example, he recognized the man knocking at a friend's studio door as Alberto Giacometti, and immediately set up an easel and invited Giacometti to draw the model with them. A few years later Brown challenged a young Richard Diebenkorn one day -- "I'll bet you can't paint a portrait," he noted -- and in short order Diebenkorn painted the first of many portraits. Brown died on February 8th after an oyster dinner with his friend Matt Gonzalez. Among ot ...
Article Link:
Huffington Post article
Matt Gonzalez is representing firm suing S.F.
San Francisco Chronicle - about 5 years
<a class="fplink fp-190199" href="/matt+gonzalez+1">Matt Gonzalez</a>, the former San Francisco Board of Supervisors president and now chief attorney in the public defender's office, was in court the other day - but not to represent an indigent defendant. Public Defender...
Article Link:
San Francisco Chronicle article
Collage, culture and mulching at Guerrero Gallery - San Francisco Chronicle
Google News - over 5 years
&quot;Building Context&quot; includes an ensemble of white-on-white constructions by Matt Gonzalez, an artist known to dabble in politics. But a couple of black-on-black pieces by him upstage them all for a simple and obvious reason. The black coated paper he
Article Link:
Google News article
Political Notebook: LGBT Democratic clubs weigh in on SF races - Bay Area Reporter
Google News - over 5 years
In 2003 it originally backed Susan Leal, a lesbian former supervisor, for mayor but then endorsed Gavin Newsom over Matt Gonzalez in the runoff election between the two former supervisors. &quot;We are always open to endorsing a gay man, lesbian, bisexual,
Article Link:
Google News article
Kelly throws no-hitter in Manchester win - Yorkdispatch.com
Google News - over 5 years
(John A. Pavoncello Photo) Glen Rock starter Matt Gonzalez matched his counterpart through the first three innings, but a leadoff blast by Biechler put the visitors ahead for good. After that, it appeared that the only thing that could have derailed
Article Link:
Google News article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Matt Gonzalez
    FORTIES
  • 2011
    Age 45
    In February 2011, Jeff Adachi appointed Gonzalez chief attorney in the Public Defender's Office
    More Details Hide Details
  • 2008
    Age 42
    In San Francisco, Gonzalez received fewer votes citywide when he ran for vice president in 2008 (3,682) than he received in District 5 (12,743) when he ran for supervisor in 2000.
    More Details Hide Details Will Harper, editor of the SF Weekly, wrote: "Eight years ago, 24,819 San Franciscans voted for Nader, according to Department of Election records. Of course, we've all had eight years to realize that throwing away our vote on a third-party candidate can do a lot of damage, so Nader's poor showing this time was not entirely unexpected. But Nader supposedly had one thing going for him in San Francisco that other candidates did not: A running mate from the city, former supervisor and Green Party pinup boy Matt Gonzalez. Obviously, having a hometown guy in the race didn't make a difference for S.F. voters sick of Republican rule of the White House".
    Gonzalez participated in the third party vice-presidential debates, along with Constitution Party vice-presidential candidate Darrell Castle and Libertarian Wayne Allyn Root, held in Las Vegas, on November 2, 2008.
    More Details Hide Details The event was hosted by Free and Equal.org and Free & Equal Elections (FREE), an organization of political parties, independent citizens and civic organizations formed to promote free and equal elections in the United States.
    On October 18, 2008 Gonzalez and Nader also held a large protest on Wall Street following the passage of the government bailout bill.
    More Details Hide Details Their opposition to the bailout was a key issue of the Nader/Gonzalez campaign, in contrast to the Democratic and Republican Party candidates who supported the bill.
    Nader announced that he and Gonzalez would not seek the Green Party nomination but would run as independents. On March 4, 2008, Gonzalez announced that he had left the Green Party and had changed his voter registration to independent.
    More Details Hide Details The change, he said, was to accommodate states, including Delaware, Idaho and Oregon, that do not allow members of political parties to run as independents.
    On February 28, 2008, only four days after announcing his presidential bid, Nader named Gonzalez as his running mate for the 2008 presidential election.
    More Details Hide Details
    In January 2008, Gonzalez, along with several other prominent Green Party members, launched Ralph Nader's 2008 Presidential Exploratory Committee to support a possible Nader candidacy.
    More Details Hide Details
    In the 2008 presidential election, Gonzalez ran for vice president as the running mate of candidate Ralph Nader.
    More Details Hide Details He currently works in San Francisco’s Public Defender's Office. Matthew Edward Gonzalez was born in McAllen, Texas. His father, a division chief for the international tobacco company Brown & Williamson, moved the family to New Orleans, Baltimore, and Louisville, Kentucky, before resettling in McAllen when Gonzalez was eleven years old.
  • THIRTIES
  • 2005
    Age 39
    In May 2005 Gonzalez sought unsuccessfully to overturn the contract of San Francisco school Superintendent Arlene Ackerman.
    More Details Hide Details His law firm brought suit against a San Francisco hotel for not paying its workers the minimum wage; two wrongful death suits against Sacramento police for using tasers; against the city of San Jose and Ringling Brothers Circus for interfering with free speech rights of protestors; and against Clear Channel in a naming rights dispute over the locally owned San Francisco Warfield Theatre. It has also been involved in examining the New Year's Eve attack on the Yale a cappella group The Baker's Dozen in Pacific Heights.
    Gonzalez left office when his term ended in January 2005.
    More Details Hide Details He was succeeded by Ross Mirkarimi, a Green Party member and community activist who had also worked on Gonzalez's campaign. Gonzalez then opened law offices with fellow Stanford University alum Whitney Leigh.
    In an interview in January 2005 on his last day in office as a supervisor, Gonzalez said of his campaign, "After getting in the runoff, literally the day after, as I heard Mayor Brown and others start attacking me for being a communist and racist, well, I started thinking I was going to lose in the very landslide I had foreseen for other candidates.
    More Details Hide Details Naturally, I worked hard to represent progressive ideas and win the race. By the end, we started thinking, hey, maybe it’s possible." Newsom outspent Gonzalez $4.4–4.9 million to $800,000–900,000. Gonzalez sought to tighten spending caps and expand public financing, and accused Newsom of campaign improprieties and spending limit violations. Newsom lost to Gonzalez on votes cast on election day, but won the election overall by 133,546 to 119,329 votes. Following the mayoral contest, Gonzalez announced he would not seek re-election to the Board of Supervisors. Explaining his decision to retire from politics, he said:
  • 2003
    Age 37
    In August 2003, Gonzalez ran for Mayor of San Francisco, in a bid to replace outgoing two-term mayor Willie Brown.
    More Details Hide Details On a ballot with nine candidates' names, Gonzalez finished second in the primary election on November 4 behind Gavin Newsom, a Democrat and fellow member of the Board of Supervisors who had been endorsed by Brown. Gonzalez received 19.6 percent of the total vote to Newsom's 41.9 percent. Because none of the candidates received a majority a run-off election was held on December 9, gaining national and international media coverage. Gonzalez faced a difficult run-off election; only 3 percent of voters in San Francisco were registered to his Green Party, and the Democratic Party, dominant in San Francisco, opposed his candidacy. Although Gonzalez was endorsed by several key local Democrats, including five members of the Board of Supervisors, national Democratic figures, concerned about Ralph Nader's role in the 2000 presidential election, campaigned on Newsom's behalf. Bill Clinton, Al Gore, Jesse Jackson, Dianne Feinstein, and Nancy Pelosi all campaigned for Newsom. In the left-leaning political newsletter CounterPunch, Bruce Anderson wrote, "If Matt Gonzalez, a member of the Green Party, is elected mayor of San Francisco, it will be a dagger straight into the rotted heart of the Democratic Party... He wants to represent the many against the fortunate few the present mayor has faithfully represented for years now."
    In January 2003, Gonzalez was elected president of the Board of Supervisors after seven rounds of voting, most of which had Gonzalez vying for a majority vote with supervisors Aaron Peskin and Sophie Maxwell.
    More Details Hide Details When Peskin dropped out Gonzalez emerged the winner, counting among his supporters conservative Board member Tony Hall, who said when asked why he voted for Gonzalez, "Gonzalez is a man of integrity and intelligence who will carry out his responsibilities fairly and impartially." Gonzalez hosted monthly art exhibits in his City Hall office. At the last reception, graffiti artist Barry McGee spray-painted "Smash the State" on the walls of the office as part of his exhibit." Gonzalez told the press that he knew his office would be repainted for the next occupant.
    After losing the mayoral election in 2003, he chose not to seek re-election.
    More Details Hide Details
    He was elected president of the Board in 2003.
    More Details Hide Details
    In 2003, Gonzalez, running as a member of the Green Party, lost a close race for mayor of San Francisco to Democrat Gavin Newsom.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 2002
    Age 36
    Two sources reported that Gonzalez defied Brown by walking out of the mayor's State of the City address in 2002.
    More Details Hide Details However, Gonzalez later told SF Weekly that he was never in attendance.
  • 2000
    Age 34
    His opponent, Juanita Owens, tried to capitalize on many Democrats' ill feelings toward the Green Party in the wake of Ralph Nader's involvement in the acrimonious 2000 presidential election, but Gonzalez won the run-off election.
    More Details Hide Details He was part of a slate of candidates who wanted to change the direction of city policy, in opposition to the "Brown machine," a Democratic Party political machine that had dominated local politics for over 30 years behind Mayor Willie Brown, the Pelosi family, and other Democrats. His supporters saw his election as a turning point in local politics. Gonzalez's critics considered him a stubborn and willful ideologue. When the Board put forth a resolution commending San Franciscan Congresswoman Nancy Pelosi for being elected House Minority Whip and being the first woman to hold that position, Gonzalez was the only board member who voted against it. Gonzalez said that supervisors should not issue commendations for winning partisan political positions and that he had written a personal note to Pelosi congratulating her, as she had done him for being elected board president. Gonzalez refused to meet with Brown during his first two years on the Board of Supervisors, saying he did so to avoid being subject to Brown's influence rather than as a matter of disrespect.
    In November 2000, Gonzalez switched from the Democratic Party to the Green Party in what he called "a political or moral epiphany."
    More Details Hide Details While protesting the absence of Green Party senatorial candidate Medea Benjamin at a debate between Senator Dianne Feinstein, a Democrat, and her Republican challenger Tom Campbell, Gonzalez decided to switch parties. He wrote, "I couldn't help thinking of how most of my support in last year's district attorney's race came as a result of being allowed into televised debates with my better-known opponents and how that support has eventually led to my being the frontrunner in the District Five supervisorial race. The more I thought about it, the more I knew I wasn't okay with it. I didn't want to be a member of a party that was urging the exclusion of a candidate solely on the grounds that the candidate didn't have enough support, when it's precisely television coverage that could win that candidate public acceptance." In 2008, as a running mate of Ralph Nader, Gonzalez left the Green Party and changed his registration to decline to state. "I expressly said to Nader that I would not run with him if he sought the Green Party nomination," Gonzalez said. "The question after the campaign was: is there a reason to go back to the Green Party?" Among the reasons he cited for the party's slide were infighting, inadequate party-building work, and the party's failure to effectively counter criticisms of Nader's 2000 and 2004 presidential campaigns. "We were losing the public relations campaign of explaining what the hell happened," he said.
    He was an important figure in San Francisco politics in the years 2000–2005, when he served on San Francisco County's Board of Supervisors and was president of the Board.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1999
    Age 33
    Gonzalez entered politics when he ran for San Francisco District Attorney in 1999.
    More Details Hide Details He campaigned to halt political corruption and marijuana prosecutions. Gonzalez lost to incumbent Terence Hallinan. In a field of five candidates, he finished third with 20,153 votes (11 percent of the total).
  • TWENTIES
  • 1991
    Age 25
    Gonzalez began working as a trial lawyer at the Office of the Public Defender in San Francisco in 1991.
    More Details Hide Details Gonzalez served one term on the San Francisco Board of Supervisors in the years 2001-2005.
  • 1990
    Age 24
    In 1990, he obtained a degree to practice law from Stanford Law School.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1987
    Age 21
    After graduating from McAllen Memorial High School, he attended Columbia University, from which he graduated in 1987.
    More Details Hide Details
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1965
    Born
    Born on June 4, 1965.
    More Details Hide Details
Original Authors of this text are noted here.
All data offered is derived from public sources. Spokeo does not verify or evaluate each piece of data, and makes no warranties or guarantees about any of the information offered. Spokeo does not possess or have access to secure or private financial information. Spokeo is not a consumer reporting agency and does not offer consumer reports. None of the information offered by Spokeo is to be considered for purposes of determining any entity or person's eligibility for credit, insurance, employment, housing, or for any other purposes covered under the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA)