Max Baer
Boxer
Max Baer
Max Baer was an American boxer of the 1930s as well as a professional wrestler and referee, and had an occasional role on film or television. He was the brother of twice World Champion boxing contender Buddy Baer and father of actor Max Baer, Jr.. Baer is rated #22 on Ring Magazine's list of 100 greatest punchers of all time.
Biography
Max Baer's personal information overview.
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Popular photos of Max Baer
News
News abour Max Baer from around the web
Baer getting flak for Nealon praise - Scranton Times-Tribune
Google News - over 5 years
Justice Max Baer acknowledged he might have to recuse himself if any discipline against Judge Nealon ever reaches the Supreme Court, but said he disagrees that his comments will influence lower-level judicial investigative panels into going easy on the
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Monday morning essentials - Pittsburgh Post Gazette
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Jen Zimmerman has a report for the Legal Intelligencer on a new benchbook for Pennsylvania trial judges on child welfare issues developed by Pennsylvania Supreme Court Max Baer with the help of a committee of trial judges and the Office of Children and
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Supreme Court justice sympathetic to Judge Nealon - Citizens Voice
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Lackawanna County Judge Terrence R. Nealon is "a fine judge" whose "dumb" mistake in a 2004 voting district consolidation case should not derail his judicial career, state Supreme Court Justice Max Baer said Monday
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Old, young help Eagles celebrate 108th birthday - Coeur d'Alene Press
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The international Order of the Eagles donates to charities like the Max Baer Heart Fund, the Robert W. Hansen Diabetes Fund and the Art Ehrmann Cancer Fund, Miller added. All local Eagles clubs participate in the fundraising. In Coeur d'Alene,
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Boxing Nicknames - Kings, Princes, Warriors and Assassins - BoxRec News
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The era that followed boasted the likes of the Black Uhlan of the Rhine Max Schmeling, Madcap Maxie Max Baer and the Cinderella Man James J. Braddock. The post-Dempsey era is best remembered, however, for the emergence of the Brown Bomber Joe Louis
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10 Most Overrated Boxers of All Time - Bleacher Report
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He beat Max Baer, a talented but inconsistent champion and then got blown out by the great Joe Louis. Ron Lyle: Too much is made of Lyle's shootout with Foreman and his win over Shavers. Many contend that he could be the equal of the Klitschko brothers
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RICHARD BEENE: Bakersfield Observed, a blog about life, media, politics and people - Bakersfield Californian
Google News - over 5 years
Max Baer hit a golf ball farther than I've ever seen one hit! And while I was making my rounds, a 7-year-old kid with a head full of hair jumped in my golf cart and with his parents permission, rode around with me on my errands
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Owens remains the ultimate Olympian - ESPN
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Jeremy Schaap is an ESPN anchor and national correspondent, based in New York since 1998. He is a best-selling author ("Cinderella Man: James J. Braddock, Max Baer, and the Greatest Upset in Boxing History") and a contributor to "E:60", "ABC World News
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25 Best Fight Scenes in Sports Movie History - Bleacher Report
Google News - over 5 years
He took this inspiration all the way to the heavyweight championship of the world, where he defeated Max Baer against all odds. The scene is made best by the shots of his family who can only listen on the radio, hoping that their husband and father
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Sunken Gardens Skate Park Vandalized - Patch.com
Google News - over 5 years
A similar occurrence happened at Max Baer Park several weeks ago. Senseless incidents such as these not only deprive the public of recreational facilities and park trees, it also places a strain on the district's limited finances, which could otherwise
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Stan The Fan: World Cup's agony of defeat - CSNBaltimore.com
Google News - over 5 years
Perhaps the almost mythic tales of Max Baer's boxing victory in 1933 versus Adolph Hitler's favorite fighter Max Schmeling is one that comes to mind. Baer, the father of actor Max Baer Jr. (Jethro on TV's “Beverly Hillbillies”) never trained very hard
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Joe Simon Looks At "My Life in Comics" - Comic Book Resources
Google News - over 5 years
In the book you mentioned Damon Runyon, who you met when you were a young man while you were both covering the boxer Max Baer. Was Runyon an influence on your comics work? "The Newsboy Legion," for example, feels very Runyon-esque. Absolutely!
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Ex-candidates add state Supreme Court to lawsuit over Harrisburg district ... - Patriot-News
Google News - over 5 years
The ex-candidates said they added Justices Thomas G. Saylor, J. Michael Eakin, Max Baer, Debra McCloskey Todd, Seamus P. McCaffrey and Joan Orrie Melvin because the whole court backed an April 15 order to shut Solomon's office at year's end as an
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Tyson's Biggest Fight - EastsideBoxing.com
Google News - over 5 years
Max Baer ( world champ), was a confessed woman beater who was such a bad example he made Tyson look like an angel. Incidentally, Baer went on to become a successful actor and an example of the perfect American gent. Personally, I believe it was all the
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Day in the museum - Philippine Star
Google News - over 5 years
... (Papa) Sarreal Sr. Separate displays pay tribute to great heavyweight fighters Sonny Liston, Frazier, Tyson, Jim Corbett, Ali, Patterson, John Sullivan, Evander Holyfield, Rocky Marciano, Jack Sharkey, Max Baer, Jack Dempsey and Ezzard Charles
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Pa. Supreme Court Delays Hearing on Philly Teacher Layoffs - NBC Philadelphia
Google News - over 5 years
Justice Max Baer released a statement saying that the hearing would be pushed back to allow the court more time for consideration of the case. Last week, over 1500 Philadelphia teachers received pink slips letting them know that they
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AP Sportlight - MLive.com
Google News - over 5 years
AP 1934 — Max Baer stops Primo Carnera in the 11th round in New York to win the world heavyweight title. 1952 — Julius Boros wins the US Open over Ed Oliver by four strokes. 1958 — Tommy Bolt beats Gary Player by four strokes to win the US Open
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Max Baer
    FIFTIES
  • 1959
    Age 50
    Baer and Rosenbloom remained friends until Baer's death in 1959.
    More Details Hide Details Baer additionally worked as a disc jockey for a Sacramento radio station, and for a while he was a wrestler. He served as public relations director for a Sacramento automobile dealership and referee for boxing and wrestling matches. Baer married twice, to actress Dorothy Dunbar (married July 8, 1931-divorced October 6, 1933), and to Mary Ellen Sullivan (1903–1978) (married June 29, 1935-his death 1959), the mother of his 3 children: actor Max Baer Jr. (born 1937), James Manny Baer (born 1942), and Maudie Marian Baer (born 1944). Baer never got to see his son perform as an actor on television. Baer Jr. played Jethro Bodine in the television series The Beverly Hillbillies and appeared on several other shows.
  • FORTIES
  • 1959
    Age 50
    Baer was an active member of the Fraternal Order of Eagles. When Max died of a heart attack in 1959, the Eagles created a charity fund as a tribute to his memory and as a means of combating the disease that killed him.
    More Details Hide Details The Max Baer Heart Fund is primarily to aid in heart research and education. Since the fund started in 1959, millions of dollars have been donated to universities, medical centers and hospitals across the United States and Canada for heart research and education. In Grant County, West Virginia, there is a road that is named "Max Baer Road", however, according to Thomas "Duke" Miller, a TV/movie/celebrity expert who resides in that state, there is no reference anywhere that the Baer family ever had any ties with West Virginia. Alluded to in: Portrayed in:
    On Wednesday, November 18, 1959, Baer refereed a nationally televised 10-round boxing match in Phoenix.
    More Details Hide Details At the end of the match, to the applause of the crowd Baer grasped the ropes and vaulted out of the ring and joined fight fans in a cocktail bar. The next day, he was scheduled to appear in several television commercials in Hollywood, California. On his way, he stopped in Garden Grove, California, to keep a promise he had made thirteen years earlier to the then five-year-old son of his ex-sparring partner, Curly Owens. Baer presented the now 18-year-old with a foreign sports car on his birthday, as he had said he would. Baer checked into the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel upon his arrival on November 19. Hotel employees said he looked fit but complained of a cold. As he was shaving, the morning of November 21, he experienced chest pains. He called the front desk and asked for a doctor. The desk clerk said "a house doctor would be right up." "A house doctor?" he replied jokingly, "No, dummy, I need a people doctor".
    At the time of his death on November 21, 1959, Baer was scheduled to appear in some TV commercials in Los Angeles before returning to his home in Sacramento.
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  • 1951
    Age 42
    In 1951, Baer teamed up with another title holder; friend and Light Heavyweight champion (1929-'34) and boxer-turned actor/comedian, Maxie Rosenbloom.
    More Details Hide Details Together, the two starred in SkipAlong Rosenbloom (written by Rosenbloom-uncredited). They embarked on a comedy tour, billed as. Baer would also take the stage at Rosenbloom's comedy club on Wilshire Blvd, Slapsy Maxie's, which was featured in the film Gangster Squad.
  • THIRTIES
  • 1941
    Age 32
    Baer retired after his next fight, on 4 April 1941, when he lost to Lou Nova on a T.K.O. in the eighth round of scheduled 10-rounder at Madison Square Garden.
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  • 1940
    Age 31
    Baer was awarded a belt declaring him the "White Heavyweight Champion of the World" after he scored a first round T.K.O. over Pat Cominsky in a bout at Roosevelt Stadium in Jersey City, New Jersey on 26 September 1940, but it was a publicity stunt.
    More Details Hide Details The fight was not promoted as being for the white heavyweight championship, and Cominsky would not have won the belt had he beaten Baer. The belt was a publicity stunt dreamed up by boxing promoters who were trying to pressure promoter Mike Jacobs into giving the ex-world heavyweight champion a rematch with current champ Joe Louis. Jacobs did not give Baer another bout with Louis.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1939
    Age 30
    In the first televised heavyweight prizefight, Baer lost to Lou Nova on June 1, 1939, on WNBT-TV in New York.
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  • 1935
    Age 26
    Baer and his brother Buddy both lost fights to Joe Louis. In the second round of Max's September 1935 match, Joe knocked Baer down to one knee, the first time he had ever been knocked to the canvas in his career.
    More Details Hide Details A sizzling left hook in the fourth round brought Max to his knee again, and the referee called the bout soon after. It was learned weeks later that Baer fought Louis with a broken right hand that never healed from his fight with Jimmy Braddock. Max was virtually helpless without his big right hand in the Louis fight.
    On June 13, 1935, one of the greatest upsets in boxing history transpired in Long Island City, New York, as Baer fought down-and-out boxer James J. Braddock in the so-called Cinderella Man bout.
    More Details Hide Details Baer hardly trained for the bout. Braddock, on the other hand, was training hard. "I'm training for a fight, not a boxing contest or a clownin' contest or a dance", he said. "Whether it goes one round or three rounds or ten rounds, it will be a fight and a fight all the way. When you've been through what I've had to face in the last two years, a Max Baer or a Bengal tiger looks like a house pet. He might come at me with a cannon and a blackjack and he would still be a picnic compared to what I've had to face." Baer, ever the showman, "brought gales of laughter from the crowd with his antics" the night he stepped between the ropes to meet Braddock. As Braddock "slipped the blue bathrobe from his pink back, he was the sentimental favorite of a Bowl crowd of 30,000, most of whom had bet their money 8-to-1 against him."
  • 1934
    Age 25
    He was Heavyweight Champion of the World from June 14, 1934 to June 13, 1935.
    More Details Hide Details Baer was inducted into the Boxing Hall of Fame in 1968, the World Boxing Hall of Fame in 1984, the International Boxing Hall of Fame in 1995 and the International Jewish Sports Hall of Fame in 2009. The 1998 Holiday Issue of Ring ranked Baer #20 in "The 50 Greatest Heavyweights of All Time". In Ring Magazine's 100 Greatest Punchers (published in 2003), Baer is ranked number 22. Baer's motion picture debut was in The Prizefighter and the Lady (1933) opposite Myrna Loy and Walter Huston. In this MGM movie he played Steven "Steve" Morgan, a bartender that the Professor, played by Huston, begins training for the ring. Steve wins a fight, then marries Belle Mercer, played by Loy. He starts seriously training, but it turns out he has a huge ego and an eye for women. Featured were Baer's upcoming opponent, Primo Carnera, as himself, whom Steve challenges for the championship, and Jack Dempsey, as himself, former heavyweight champion, acting as the referee.
    On June 14, 1934, Baer, after knocking him down 11 times, won by technical knockout over the massive, 275-pound (125-kg) Primo Carnera, Heavyweight Champion of the World, to win the world title, which he would hold for 364 days.
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  • 1933
    Age 24
    On June 8, 1933, Baer fought and defeated (by a technical knockout) German heavyweight and former world champion, Max Schmeling, at Yankee Stadium.
    More Details Hide Details Schmeling was favored to win, and was Adolf Hitler's favorite fighter. The Nazi tabloid Der Stürmer publicly attacked Schmeling for fighting a non-Aryan, calling it a "racial and cultural disgrace." Hitler summoned Schmeling for a private meeting in April, where he told Schmeling to contact him for help if he had any problems in the U.S., and requested that during any press interviews, he should tell the American public that news reports about Jewish persecution in Germany were untrue. However, a few days after that meeting, Hitler put a national ban on boxing by Jews along with a boycott of all Jewish businesses. When Schmeling arrived in New York, he did as Hitler requested, and denied problems of anti-Semitism existed, adding that many of his neighbors were Jews, as was his manager. Although the Great Depression, then in full force, had lowered the income of most citizens, sixty thousand people attended the fight. NBC radio updated millions nationwide as the match progressed. Baer, who was one-quarter Jewish, wore trunks which displayed the Star of David, a symbol he wore in all his future bouts. When the fight began, he dominated the rugged Schmeling into the tenth round, when Baer knocked him down and the referee stopped the match. Columnist Westbrook Pegler wrote about Schmeling's loss, "That wasn't a defeat, that was a disaster", while journalist David Margolick claimed that Baer's win would come to "symbolize Jewry's struggle against the Nazis."
    Five months after the Baer fight, on February 11, 1933, Schaaf died in the ring after taking a left jab from the Italian fighter Primo Carnera.
    More Details Hide Details The majority of sports editors noted, however, that an autopsy later revealed Schaaf had meningitis, a swelling of the brain, and was still recovering from a severe case of influenza when he touched gloves with Carnera. Schaaf's obituary stated that "just before his bout with Carnera, Schaaf went into reclusion in a religious retreat near Boston to recuperate from an attack of influenza" which produced the meningitis. The death of Campbell and accusations over Schaaf's demise profoundly affected Baer, even though he was ostensibly indestructible and remained a devastating force in the ring. According to his son, actor/director Max Baer Jr. (who was born seven years after the incident): My father cried about what happened to Frankie Campbell. He had nightmares. In reality, my father was one of the kindest, gentlest men you would ever hope to meet. He treated boxing the way today's professional wrestlers do wrestling: part sport, mostly showmanship. He never deliberately hurt anyone.
  • 1930
    Age 21
    The Campbell incident earned Baer the reputation as a "killer" in the ring. This publicity was further sensationalized by Baer's return bout with Ernie Schaaf, who had bested Baer in a decision during Max's Eastern debut bout at Madison Square Garden on September 19, 1930.
    More Details Hide Details An Associated Press article in the September 9, 1932 Sports section of the New York Times describes the end of the return bout as follows: Two seconds before the fight ended Schaaf was knocked flat on his face, completely knocked out. He was dragged to his corner and his seconds worked over for him for three minutes before restoring him to his senses... Baer smashed a heavy right to the jaw that shook Schaaf to his heels, to start the last round, then walked into the Boston fighter, throwing both hands to the head and body. Baer drove three hard rights to the jaw that staggered Schaaf. Baer beat Schaaf around the ring and into the ropes with a savage attack to the head and body. Just before the round ended Baer dropped Schaaf to the canvas, but the bell sounded as Schaaf hit the floor. Schaaf complained frequently of headaches after that bout.
    Baer fought Frankie Campbell on August 25, 1930, in San Francisco in a ring built over home plate at San Francisco's Recreation Park for the unofficial title of Pacific Coast champion.
    More Details Hide Details In the second round, Campbell clipped Baer and Baer slipped to the canvas. Campbell went toward his corner and waved to the crowd. He thought Baer was getting the count. Baer got up and flew at Campbell, landing a right to Campbell's turned head which sent him to the canvas. After the round, Campbell said to his trainer, "Something feels like it snapped in my head", but went on to handily win rounds 3 and 4. As Baer rose for the 5th round, Tillie "Kid" Herman, Baer's former friend and trainer, who had switched camps overnight and was now in Campbell's corner, savagely taunted and jeered Baer. In a rage and determined to end the bout with a knockout, Baer soon had Campbell against the ropes. As he hammered him with punch after punch, the ropes were the only thing holding Campbell up. By the time Referee Toby Irwin stopped the fight, Campbell collapsed to the canvas. Baer's own seconds reportedly ministered to Campbell, and Baer stayed by his side until an ambulance arrived 30 minutes later. Baer "visited the stricken fighter's bedside", where he offered Frankie's wife Ellie the hand that hit her husband. She took that hand and the two stood speechless for a moment. "It was unfortunate, I'm awfully sorry", said Baer. "It even might have been you, mightn't it?" she replied.
  • TEENAGE
  • 1929
    Age 20
    Baer turned professional in 1929, progressing steadily through the Pacific Coast ranks.
    More Details Hide Details A ring tragedy little more than a year later almost caused Baer to drop out of boxing for good.
  • 1928
    Age 19
    In 1928, Jacob leased the Twin Oaks Ranch in Murray Township where he raised more than 2,000 hogs, and worked with daughter Frances's husband, Louis Santucci.
    More Details Hide Details Baer often credited working as a butcher boy, carrying heavy carcasses of meat, stunning cattle with one blow, and working at a gravel pit, for developing his powerful shoulders (an article in the January 1939 edition of The Family Circle Magazine reported that Baer also took the Charles Atlas exercise course.)
  • 1926
    Age 17
    The Baers lived in the Northern Californian towns of Hayward, San Leandro and Galt before moving to Livermore in 1926.
    More Details Hide Details Livermore was cowboy country, surrounded by tens of thousands of acres of rangeland which supported large cattle herds that provided fresh meat to the local area.
  • 1922
    Age 13
    In May 1922, tired of the Durango, Colorado winters, which aggravated Frances's rheumatic fever and Jacob's high blood pressure, the Baers drove to the milder climes of the West Coast, where Dora's sister lived in Alameda, California.
    More Details Hide Details Jacob's expertise in the butcher business led to numerous job offers around the San Francisco Bay Area. While living in Hayward, Max took his first job as a delivery boy for John Lee Wilbur. Wilbur ran a grocery store and bought meat from Jacob.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1909
    Age 0
    Baer was born on February 11, 1909 in Omaha, Nebraska to Jacob Baer (1875–1938), who was half Lutheran German and half Jewish German, and Dora Bales (1877–1938), who was of Scots-Irish Protestant American ancestry.
    More Details Hide Details Baer was nominally raised in a nonsectarian home. His eldest sister was Frances May Baer (1905–1991), his younger sister was Bernice Jeanette Baer (1911–1987), his younger brother was boxer-turned-actor Jacob Henry Baer, better known as Buddy Baer (1915–1986), and his adopted brother was August "Augie" Baer.
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