Maxine Sullivan
American blues and jazz singer
Maxine Sullivan
Maxine Sullivan, born Marietta Williams, was an American jazz vocalist and performer. As a vocalist, Maxine Sullivan was active for half a century, from the mid-1930s to just before her death in 1987. She is best known for her 1937 recording of a swing version of the Scottish folk song "Loch Lomond". Throughout her career, Sullivan also appeared as a performer on film as well as on stage.
Biography
Maxine Sullivan's personal information overview.
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News
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Audrey Silver Quartet Performs at Miles Cafe June 14 - Broadway World
Google News - over 5 years
In demand bassist, Joe Fitzgerald has performed and toured with an endless list of jazz luminaries including Bruce Barth, Ken Peplowski, Maxine Sullivan and Gene Bertoncini. Tom Beckham "has a refreshing approach to the vibraphone
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Google News article
For the love of music - Daily American Online
Google News - over 5 years
... Harold Betters, Art Blakey, Ray Brown, Sonny Clark, Johnny Costa, Billy Eckstine, Roy Eldridge, Erroll Garner, Slide Hampton, Walt Harper, Earl Hines, Roger Humphries, Ahmad Jamal, Jessica Lee, Billy Strayhorn, Maxine Sullivan, Stanley Turrentine,
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“Jazz” - Compilation with a dozen jazz legends [TrackList below] - Putumayo ... - Audiophile Audition
Google News - almost 6 years
Among the vocalists, classic tracks from Holiday, Baker, Louis Armstrong, Mose Allison, Nat Cole, Anita O'Day, Nina Simone, Blossom Dearie and Maxine Sullivan are heard. The Armstrong treatment of “I Was Doing All Right” sports the great Oscar Peterson
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Putumayo Presents Jazz Classics - World Music Central
Google News - almost 6 years
Swinging through The King Cole Trio's “Deed I Do,” Maxine Sullivan's “Tain't No Use,” and Zoot Sims's “Someone to Watch Over Me,” Jazz sparkles with jazz's all time greats. If you add in Anita O'Day's dishy track “It Don't Mean a Thing,” Cannonball
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Carolina Jazz Connection & Women in Jazz Films - Yes! Weekly
Google News - almost 6 years
... multi-racial all-women jazz band of the 1940s. Profiles legendary jazz trumpeter Tiny Davis and her partner of over 40 years, drummer-pianist Ruby Lucas. A portrait of the once famous, and now, largely forgotten jazz vocalist Maxine Sullivan
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SUMMER RITUALS | PLAY STREET; Play Street Becomes a Sanctuary
NYTimes - over 7 years
SOME mornings there is more street than play on Lyman Place. A single toddler stomps through a trickle of water in the gutter. Two young boys take turns hauling each other down the street in a plastic crate. A girl tosses a purple volleyball through the lower rungs of a fire escape. Yet every day for the past 33 summers, Hetty Fox has made sure the
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NYTimes article
Step Into the Attic. Enter the Jazz Age.
NYTimes - about 10 years
In the spring of 2004, a tall and trim 31-year-old real estate developer and investor from Harlem named Ed Poteat received a call from a broker about a hot deal in the Morrisania section of the Bronx. The broker was calling about a Neoclassical building on Ritter Place dating from the early 20th century that was going on sale. The house was small
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NYTimes article
Martha Tilton, 91, 'Sweetheart of Swing'
NYTimes - about 10 years
Martha Tilton, who as one of Benny Goodman's vocalists in the 1930s was billed as the ''Sweetheart of Swing'' and appeared on 80 of his recordings, including the celebrated 1939 rendition of ''And the Angels Sing,'' died on Dec. 8 at her home in the Los Angeles neighborhood of Brentwood. She was 91. Her Web site announced the death, suggesting that
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NYTimes article
Queen of the Night
NYTimes - almost 11 years
FEVER The Life and Music of Miss Peggy Lee. By Peter Richmond. Illustrated. 449 pp. Henry Holt & Company. $30. To have experienced the sound and image of Peggy Lee in the 1950's and 60's was to be bewitched by the pop-jazz equivalent of a film noir femme fatale. Her soft, stealthy voice, always lingering behind the beat, hinted at secrets that
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NYTimes article
Lost and Found: An Era in the Bronx; A Neighborhood Documents Its Past as an Enclave of Black Prosperity
NYTimes - over 12 years
James Pruitt and his four siblings grew up in the Bronx keenly aware of family and community. Inside the parlor of his childhood home on East 168th Street, where two of his sisters still live, photographs of several generations of relatives cover the baby grand piano. With scrapbooks or just memories, they can regale a visitor with tales dating to
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NYTimes article
Don Lamond, 82, a Drummer In Many Classic Jazz Bands
NYTimes - about 13 years
Don Lamond, a swing band drummer who was a standout with Woody Herman in the late 1940's, died on Tuesday at a hospital in Orlando, Fla. He was 82 and lived in Orlando. The cause was a malignant brain tumor, said his wife, Terry Lamond, who sang and recorded with his band in the 1980's. Mr. Lamond joined Herman's Herd in 1945, replacing Dave Tough.
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NYTimes article
Jimmy Maxwell, 85, a Lead Trumpeter With the Top Big Bands
NYTimes - over 14 years
Jimmy Maxwell, who played trumpet with many of the best-known big bands in jazz and was also a mainstay of the radio and television studios, died on Saturday at his home in Great Neck, N.Y. He was 85. As a lead trumpeter in the bands of Benny Goodman, Count Basie, Woody Herman and others, Mr. Maxwell was not usually a soloist, but shaped the sound
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NYTimes article
More Sustenance for a Fan of Jazz
NYTimes - over 16 years
MAX WILK is a respected and well-known writer in television, film, theater, fiction and nonfiction. The Westport Arts Advisory Committee in fact will honor Mr. Wilk, along with seven other people, with its lifetime achievement arts award at 2 p.m. today at Westport Town Hall. Yet there are many jazz aficionados who, without ever having read or
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NYTimes article
MUSIC; Colleagues Help a Musician in Need
NYTimes - about 17 years
FOR nearly half a century, musicians in need could count on David Amram to volunteer his time and talents on their behalf. Now he is in need -- his uninsured Putnam Valley home was destroyed by fire in October -- and more than a dozen colleagues are planning an Amram Jam next Saturday at 8 p.m. at the Tarrytown Music Hall to raise money for
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NYTimes article
Franklin Heller, 85, Director Of TV Quiz 'What's My Line?'
NYTimes - over 19 years
Franklin M. Heller, who directed the long-running television quiz show ''What's My Line?'' and many other dramatic and musical programs, died yesterday at Evergreen Woods, a retirement community in North Branford, Conn. He was 85. Mr. Heller began his career in the theater, taking up acting while still a student at the Carnegie Institute of
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NYTimes article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Maxine Sullivan
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 1987
    Age 75
    Maxine Sullivan died aged 75 in 1987 in New York after suffering a seizure.
    More Details Hide Details She was posthumously inducted into the Big Band and Jazz Hall of Fame in 1998.
  • 1979
    Age 67
    She was nominated for the 1979 Tony Award for Best Featured Actress in a Musical (won by Carlin Glynn) for her role in My Old Friends, and participated in the film biography Maxine Sullivan: Love to Be in Love, shortly before her death.
    More Details Hide Details
  • FORTIES
  • 1958
    Age 46
    From 1958 Sullivan worked as a nurse before resuming her musical career in 1966, performing in jazz festivals alongside her fourth husband Cliff Jackson, who can be heard on the 1966 live recording of Sullivan's performance at the Manassas Jazz Festival.
    More Details Hide Details Sullivan continued to perform throughout the 1970s and made a string of recordings during the 1980s, despite being over 70 years old.
  • 1956
    Age 44
    In 1956, Sullivan shifted from her earlier style and recorded the album A Tribute to Andy Razaf; originally on the Period record label, the album featured Sullivan's interpretations of a dozen tunes featuring Razaf's lyrics.
    More Details Hide Details The album also highlighted the music of Fats Waller, including versions of "Keepin' Out of Mischief Now", "How Can You Face Me?", "My Fate Is in Your Hands", "Honeysuckle Rose", "Ain't Misbehavin'", and "Blue Turning Grey Over You". Sullivan was joined by a sextet that was reminiscent of John Kirby's group of 15 years prior, including trumpeter Charlie Shavers and clarinetist Buster Bailey.
  • THIRTIES
  • 1950
    Age 38
    Sullivan married four times; her second husband was the band leader John Kirby (married 1938, divorced 1941), while her fourth husband, whom she married in 1950, was the stride pianist Cliff Jackson, who died in 1970.
    More Details Hide Details She had two children, Orville Williams (b. 1928) and Paula Morris (b. 1945). http://www.nytimes.com/2007/01/28/nyregion/thecity/28jazz.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0http://www.answers.com/topic/maxine-sullivan-1
  • 1949
    Age 37
    In 1949, Sullivan appeared on the short-lived CBS Television series Uptown Jubilee, and in 1953 starred in the play, Take a Giant Step.
    More Details Hide Details
  • TWENTIES
  • 1940
    Age 28
    In 1940, Sullivan and Kirby were featured on the radio program Flow Gently Sweet Rhythm, making them the first black jazz stars to have their own weekly radio series.
    More Details Hide Details During the 1940s Sullivan then performed with a wide range of bands, including her husband's sextet and groups headed by Teddy Wilson, Benny Carter, and Jimmie Lunceford. Sullivan performed at many of New York's hottest jazz spots such as the Ruban Bleu, the Village Vanguard, the Blue Angel, and the Penthouse.
  • 1938
    Age 26
    During this period, she began forming a professional and close personal relationship with bassist John Kirby, who became her second husband in 1938.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1937
    Age 25
    Early sessions with Kirby in 1937 yielded a hit recording of a swing version of the Scottish folk song "Loch Lomond" featuring Sullivan on vocals.
    More Details Hide Details This early success "branded" Sullivan's style, leading her to sing similar swing arrangements of traditional folk tunes mostly arranged by pianist Claude Thornhill, such as "If I Had a Ribbon Bow" and "I Dream of Jeanie". Her early popularity also led to a brief appearance in the movie Going Places with Louis Armstrong.
    Mosier introduced her to Claude Thornhill, which led to her first recordings made in June 1937.
    More Details Hide Details Shortly thereafter, Sullivan became a featured vocalist at the Onyx Club in New York.
    She is best known for her 1937 recording of a swing version of the Scottish folk song "Loch Lomond".
    More Details Hide Details Throughout her career, Sullivan also appeared as a performer on film as well as on stage. A precursor to better-known later vocalists such as Ella Fitzgerald, Billie Holiday, and Sarah Vaughan, Maxine Sullivan is considered one of the best jazz vocalists of the 1930s. Sullivan began her music career singing in her uncle's band, The Red Hot Peppers, in her native Pennsylvania, in which she occasionally played the flugelhorn and the valve trombone, in addition to singing. In the mid-1930s she was discovered by Gladys Mosier (then working in Ina Ray Hutton's big band).
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1911
    Born
    Born on May 13, 1911.
    More Details Hide Details
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