Nanette Fabray
Actor
Nanette Fabray
Nanette Fabray is an American actress, comedienne, singer, dancer, and activist. She began her career performing in vaudeville as a child and became a musical theatre actress during the 1940s and 1950s, winning a Tony Award in 1949 for her performance in Love Life. In the mid-1950s, she served as Sid Caesar's comedic partner on Caesar's Hour, for which she won three Emmy Awards. From 1979 to 1984, she appeared as Grandma Katherine Romano on One Day at a Time.
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Nanette Fabray's personal information overview.
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News
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New Plainfield Dinner Theater to Debut in October with Broadway Music Revue - Patch.com
Google News - over 5 years
Gary Giocomo's career rundown, in fact, includes stints as the director of several casino-based theaters in Las Vegas, including Bally's, MGM Grand and the Paris Hotel, the director of theater productions starring Margaret O'Brien, Nanette Fabray and
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Google News article
Karen Mason, Chris Hoch, et al. Set for ARMS AND THE GIRL Reading, 5/26 - Broadway World
Google News - almost 6 years
Produced by The Theatre Guild, directed by Rouben Mamoulian and choreographed by Michael Kidd, the musical starred Nanette Fabray, Georges Guetary and Pearl Bailey. It received favorable reviews and played 134 performances. The score was originally to
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SPARE TIMES
NYTimes - over 6 years
Around Town Museums and Sites Museum of the City of New York Through Sunday, ''America's Mayor: John V. Lindsay and the Reinvention of New York''; on Monday at 6:30 p.m., ''Music of Old New York,'' a performance by the pianist Richard Dowling of music from the mid-1800s to the 1920s by Scott Joplin, George M. Cohan and others; and on Tuesday at
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NYTimes article
Paid Notice: Deaths FULFORD, DAVID
NYTimes - about 8 years
FULFORD--David. Leading Summer Stock Director and Producer David Fulford, a leading force in Summer Theater in its heyday from the mid 1950s to the mid 1980s died in New York City on January 20, 2009. He was 83 year old. In 1954, Mr. Fulford started a small summer stock company in an old barn in Canal Fulton, Ohio. Hiring young New York actors in
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NYTimes article
Cyd Charisse, 86, Silken Dancer of the Movies, Dies
NYTimes - over 8 years
Cyd Charisse, the leggy beauty whose balletic grace made her a memorable partner for Fred Astaire and Gene Kelly in classic MGM musicals like ''Singin' in the Rain,'' ''The Band Wagon'' and ''Brigadoon,'' died on Tuesday in Los Angeles. She was believed to be 86. Her death, at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, was apparently caused by a heart attack,
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MUSIC REVIEW | DEBORAH VOIGT; Diva as Broadway Baby
NYTimes - about 9 years
What is an imperial Wagnerian soprano to make of Mary Poppins? When she administers that spoonful of sugar to make the medicine go down, how bitter should it taste behind its sickly sweet camouflage? In Deborah Voigt's interpretations of songs made famous by Julie Andrews and other Broadway sopranos, she graciously leans forward from her throne but
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Paid Notice: Deaths LAUGHLIN, DICK
NYTimes - over 9 years
LAUGHLIN--Dick . January 19, 1936-September 5, 2007. Richard LeRoy Laughlin, aka Dick Laughlin, 71, died just after midnight Sept. 5 at his Indianapolis home. He was educated in a one-room schoolhouse in Pana, Ill., and graduated from Odon - Madison Township High School, Odon, Ind., in 1954. He attended Indiana State University, Terre Haute, where
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NYTimes article
THEATER REVIEW; So This Handsome Stranger Comes to Town
NYTimes - over 9 years
A musical that mashes up con men, bird-watchers, the Rutgers football team and someone -- never mind who -- in a gorilla suit is not likely to have a lot on its mind. ''High Button Shoes'' aspires only to be silly and entertaining, and in the current production at Goodspeed Opera House it is just that. The hurdy-gurdy music playing outside the
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Janet Blair, 85, Actress in Films Who Shifted to TV in the '50s
NYTimes - about 10 years
Janet Blair, a vivacious actress who appeared in several 1940s musicals and comedies before turning to television shows with stars like Sid Caesar and Henry Fonda, died on Monday in Santa Monica. She was 85. The cause was complications of pneumonia, her children, Amanda and Andrew Mayo, said. Ms. Blair was singing with Hal Kemp's band at the
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Betty Comden, Half of Writing Duo Behind Musicals of Grace and Wit, Dies at 89
NYTimes - over 10 years
Betty Comden, who with her longtime collaborator Adolph Green wrote the lyrics and often the librettos for some of the most celebrated musicals of stage and screen, died yesterday in Manhattan. She was 89 and lived in Manhattan. The cause was heart failure, said Ronald Konecky, her lawyer and the executor of her estate. During a professional
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MUSIC REVIEW; A Jazzy Tribute to Dad, With the Accent on Swing
NYTimes - over 10 years
The jazz singer and sometime actress Sarah Partridge is an intriguing product of what might be called musical home schooling. When she was 5, she recalls in her breezy new show, her father, a jazz fan, played June Christy's recording of ''Great Scot,'' an innocuously playful swinger by Mildred Kirkham, whose lyrics proclaim, ''Great Scot/Look what
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David W. Tebet TV -- Talent Executive, 91
NYTimes - over 11 years
David W. Tebet, a television talent executive who recruited Johnny Carson for NBC's ''Tonight'' show and later rose to the leadership ranks of Carson's production company, died here on Tuesday at the home of a nephew. He was 91. The cause was complications of a stroke, his family told The Los Angeles Times. A former theater publicist in New York,
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Jay Marshall, 85, the Dean of Magic, Is Dead
NYTimes - almost 12 years
Jay Marshall, a magician whose accomplishments -- from appearing 14 times on ''The Ed Sullivan Show'' to playing New York's Palace and London's Palladium -- persuaded America's conjurers to elect him their dean, died Tuesday in Chicago. He was 85. The cause was a heart attack, his son Alexander said. In 1992, Mr. Marshall became dean of the Society
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Critic's Choice: New DVD's
NYTimes - almost 12 years
'The Band Wagon' The centerpiece of a new collection of musicals from Warner Home Video, Vincente Minnelli's ''Band Wagon'' (1953) could be the most personal of his many signal contributions to the genre. The plot of the original 1931 Howard Dietz-Arthur Schwartz Broadway show (which starred Fred Astaire and his sister, Adele) had recently been
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Ghosts Of El Morocco
NYTimes - over 12 years
FOR many years, my family maintained an apartment on East 48th Street in Manhattan, from which my benevolent Uncle Len, who raised me from childhood, would often dart out in the night. At 6-foot-6, with a silver streak in his shined black hair, and wearing a dinner jacket, Uncle Len passed as a cross between Gregory Peck and Cesar Romero. And where
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TV SPORTS; Only Red Sox Fans Can Explain Pain
NYTimes - over 13 years
These things keep happening to the Boston Red Sox. There's the Babe Ruth sale, the Johnny Pesky throw, the Bill Buckner grounder through the legs. And no World Series titles in 85 years. Now, a new indignity: as the narrator of its tragic-comic documentary ''The Curse of the Bambino,'' HBO chose Ben Affleck, co-star of ''Gigli,'' a movie with worse
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Footlights
NYTimes - about 15 years
Hail, Fellows The National Endowment for the Arts has chosen the recipients of its 2002 Jazz Masters Fellowships. This honor recognizes contributions to jazz, artistic excellence and impact on music and is worth $20,000. On the 20th anniversary of the program and following such previous winners as Dave Brubeck, Betty Carter, Lionel Hampton and
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Footlights
NYTimes - over 15 years
Carmen Revisited When Salvador Távora was a boy of 8 in Spain, his great-great-grandmother told him stories of a Gypsy heroine and her exploited co-workers in a cigarette factory in 19th-century Seville. The heroine was Carmen de Triana. Her life was romanticized in the Bizet opera based on Prosper Mérimée's novel, and beginning tonight in the
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NYTimes article
Great Caesar's Toast; New Attention Burnishes the Reputation of a TV Pioneer
NYTimes - over 16 years
Sid Caesar rarely watches comedy shows on television anymore. ''I just can't sit and watch because as soon as I do, I start analyzing,'' he said. ''I say to myself, 'They could have done this scene better,' or 'That was a mistake,' or 'Why didn't they have this character do that?' I can't enjoy it. So I watch the History Channel.'' At 78, Mr.
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THEATER REVIEW; A Guy Thing: Strutting Past Trouble
NYTimes - over 16 years
SO what do you want to know first? Do they really take off all their clothes? Yes. Can you see, you know, everything? No, at least not from where I was sitting. And -- oops, almost forgot -- is it any good? Well, put it this way: the Eugene O'Neill Theater won't have to look for a new tenant for a long, long time. ''The Full Monty,'' the hearty
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Nanette Fabray
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 2007
    Age 86
    Fabray's most recent work was in 2007, when she appeared in The Damsel Dialogues, an original revue by composer Dick DeBenedictis, with direction/choreography by Miriam Nelson.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 2001
    Age 80
    In 2001, she wrote to advice columnist Dear Abby, to decry the loud background music played on television programs.
    More Details Hide Details Nanette Fabray has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.
  • 1984
    Age 63
    She is a resident of Pacific Palisades, California; and is the aunt of singer/actress Shelley Fabares. Her niece's 1984 wedding to actor Mike Farrell was at her home.
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  • FORTIES
  • 1963
    Age 42
    She received a Tony nomination for her role as Nell Henderson in 1963 for Mr. President 1963 after an eleven-year absence from the New York stage.
    More Details Hide Details Fabray continued to tour in musicals for many years, appearing in such shows as Wonderful Town and No No Nanette. In the mid-1940s, Fabray worked regularly for David Sarnoff and NBC on a variety of programs in the Los Angeles area. In the late 1940s and early 1950s, she made her first high-profile national television appearances performing on a number of variety programs such as The Ed Sullivan Show, Texaco Star Theater, and The Arthur Murray Party.
  • 1961
    Age 40
    Her brief, eponymously titled 1961 comedy series was cancelled after 13 episodes.
    More Details Hide Details On the PBS program Pioneers of Television: Sitcoms, Mary Tyler Moore credited Fabray with inspiring her trademark comedic crying technique. In 1953, Fabray played her most well-known screen role as a Betty Comden-like playwright in MGM's The Band Wagon with Fred Astaire and Jack Buchanan. The film featured Fabray, Astaire, and Buchanan performing the classic musical number "Triplets", which was included in That's Entertainment, Part II. Additional film credits include The Subterraneans (1960), The Happy Ending (1969), Harper Valley PTA (1978), Amy (1981), and Teresa's Tattoo (1994).
  • THIRTIES
  • 1957
    Age 36
    The couple was married from 1957 until his death in 1973.
    More Details Hide Details They had one child.
  • 1954
    Age 33
    She also appeared on Your Show of Shows as a guest star opposite Sid Caesar. She appeared as a regular on Caesar's Hour from 1954 to 1956, winning three Emmys.
    More Details Hide Details Fabray left the show after a misunderstanding when her business manager, unbeknownst to her, made unreasonable demands for her third season contract. Fabray and Caesar did not reconcile until years later. Fabray appeared as the mother of the main character on television series such as One Day at a Time, The Mary Tyler Moore Show, and Coach, where she played mother to real-life niece Shelley Fabares. She also made appearances on The Carol Burnett Show, Burke's Law, Love, American Style, Maude, The Love Boat, What's My Line?, and Murder, She Wrote.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1949
    Age 28
    In 1949, she won the Tony Award for Best Performance by a Leading Actress in a Musical for her portrayal of Susan Cooper in the Kurt Weill/Alan Jay Lerner musical Love Life.
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  • TEENAGE
  • 1940
    Age 19
    She next appeared in the stage production Meet the People in Los Angeles in 1940, which then toured the United States in 1940-1941.
    More Details Hide Details In the show, she sang the opera aria "Caro nome" from Giuseppe Verdi's Rigoletto while tap dancing. During the show's New York run, Fabray was invited to perform the "Caro nome" number for a benefit at Madison Square Garden with Eleanor Roosevelt as the main speaker. Ed Sullivan was the Master of Ceremonies for the event and the famed host, reading a cue card, mispronounced her name as "Nanette Fa-bare-ass." After this embarrassing faux pas, the actress changed the spelling of her name from Fabares to Fabray. Artur Rodziński, conductor of the New York Philharmonic, saw Fabray's performance in Meet the People and offered to sponsor operatic vocal training for her at the Juilliard School. She studied opera at Juilliard during the latter half of 1941 while performing in her first Broadway musical, Cole Porter's Let's Face It!, with Danny Kaye and Eve Arden. She decided that she preferred musical theatre over opera and withdrew from the school after five months. She became a successful musical theatre actress in New York during the 1940s and early 1950s, starring in such productions as By Jupiter (1942), My Dear Public (1943), Jackpot (1944), Bloomer Girl (1946), High Button Shoes (1947), Arms and the Girl (1950), and Make a Wish (1951).
  • 1939
    Age 18
    She entered Los Angeles Junior College in the fall of 1939, but withdrew a few months later.
    More Details Hide Details She had always had difficulty in school due to an undiagnosed hearing impairment, which made learning difficult. She eventually was diagnosed with a hearing loss in her 20s after an acting teacher encouraged her to get her hearing tested. Fabray said of the experience, "It was a revelation to me. All these years I had thought I was stupid, but in reality I just had a hearing problem." At the age of 19, Fabray made her feature film debut as one of Bette Davis's ladies-in-waiting in The Private Lives of Elizabeth and Essex (1939). She appeared in two additional motion pictures that year for Warner Brothers, The Monroe Doctrine and A Child Is Born, but failed to gain a long-term studio contract.
    She then attended Hollywood High School, where she graduated in 1939.
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  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1923
    Age 2
    She made her professional stage debut as "Miss New Years Eve 1923" at the Million Dollar Theater at the age of three.
    More Details Hide Details She spent much of her childhood appearing in vaudeville productions as a dancer and singer. She appeared with stars such as Ben Turpin. Fabray's parents divorced when she was nine, but continued living together for financial reasons. During the Great Depression, her mother turned their home into a boarding house, which Fabray and her siblings helped run. In her early teenage years, Fabray attended the Max Reinhardt School of the Theatre on a scholarship.
  • 1920
    Born
    Born on October 27, 1920.
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