Neil Papiano
American lawyer
Neil Papiano
Neil Papiano born November 25, 1934 (age 77), in Salt Lake City, Utah, is an American lawyer, and managing partner of Iverson, Yoakum, Papiano & Hatch. He received B.A. and M.A. degrees from Stanford University, the latter in 1957, and an LL.B. from Vanderbilt University Law School in 1961. He was admitted to the State Bar of California in 1961 and is a member of the Los Angeles County and American Bar Associations.
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Sports Briefing
NYTimes - about 12 years
HORSE RACING Valenzuela Is Cleared The jockey Patrick Valenzuela was cleared yesterday to resume his career when the California Horse Racing Board upheld a ruling by an administrative law judge that voided a stewards' suspension in August. Valenzuela said he and his lawyer, Neil Papiano, would seek to restore his license today with the hope that he
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PLUS: HORSE RACING; Bonus Dispute Settled Before Trial
NYTimes - about 14 years
The dispute over a $1 million bonus that the Kentucky Derby and Preakness winner, War Emblem, earned last year has been settled before reaching trial. The Thoroughbred Corporation received $700,000 of the bonus while Russell Reineman of Chicago, who owned 10 percent of War Emblem, received $315,000, the lawyer Neil Papiano, who represented the
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PLUS: HORSE RACING; Baffert Awarded Court Expenses
NYTimes - over 14 years
A federal judge awarded the trainer Bob Baffert $102,780 to cover expenses in his dispute with the California Horse Racing Board over a horse's positive drug test two years ago. The judge announced his ruling Tuesday, Baffert's lawyer, Neil Papiano, said. Baffert trains War Emblem, who won the Kentucky Derby and the Preakness and will attempt to
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ON HORSE RACING; Baffert Seeking Redemption in a Summer That Has Gone Sour
NYTimes - over 15 years
He captured two legs of this spring's Triple Crown with Point Given, has one of the nation's top older horses in Captain Steve and is the runaway leader in the national trainer standing with more than $10.2 million in purses. This should have been a summer of fun for the trainer Bob Baffert, one that all of horse racing could savor as it counted
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PLUS: HORSE RACING; Baffert Loses On Suspension
NYTimes - over 15 years
The trainer Bob Baffert should start serving a 60-day suspension on June 25 for a positive drug test on one of his horses 13 months ago, Robert Tourtelot, the chairman of the California Horse Racing Board, decided yesterday. Baffert's lawyer, Neil Papiano, said he would go to court to delay the suspension pending an appeal to the racing board. The
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PLUS: HORSE RACING; Baffert Protesting Drug Suspension
NYTimes - over 15 years
Neil Papiano, an attorney for Bob Baffert, said yesterday that Baffert, the nation's leading thoroughbred trainer, would appeal his 60-day suspension for a positive drug test on one of his horses 13 months ago. The suspension is scheduled to run from June 25 to Aug. 23 unless a stay is granted by the California Horse Racing Board or the court
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CHRONICLE
NYTimes - over 22 years
ELIZABETH TAYLOR is seeking a preliminary injunction to stop NBC from making a mini-series based on her life, The Associated Press reported earlier this week. She will have her day in court on Sept. 22, but before then, on Sept. 9, Judge Diane Wayne of Los Angeles Superior Court will hear lawyers for NBC on their motion to dismiss Miss Taylor's
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CHRONICLE
NYTimes - over 22 years
The Medical Board of California has reprimanded doctors who prescribed huge doses of controlled and addictive drugs to treat ELIZABETH TAYLOR for pain and falsified patient files, The Associated Press reported yesterday. The board could have attempted to suspend or revoke the doctors' licenses, but DIXON ARNETT, its executive director, said, "We
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Michael Jackson's Lawyer And Investigator Quit Jobs
NYTimes - about 23 years
With most of Michael Jackson's friends silent and his career at a standstill, the crisis surrounding the pop superstar took an unexpected turn today with the disclosure that his longtime lawyer and private investigator had quit. Jackson aides confirmed the resignation of Bertram Fields, one of Hollywood's top lawyers, and Anthony Pellicano, Mr.
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WATERGATE, THEN AND NOW; Lawsuit Over a Watergate Book Could Put Scandal Back in Court
NYTimes - over 24 years
They were a study in contrasts back in 1973. G. Gordon Liddy, the flamboyant former F.B.I. agent who led the Watergate break-in, stonewalled at naming co-conspirators in the scandal. John W. Dean 3d, the cool, button-downed counsel to Richard M. Nixon, gave damning testimony that linked the President to the cover-up. Because of a dispute between
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SPORTS PEOPLE: HORSE RACING; Shoemaker Files Suit
NYTimes - almost 25 years
A year after his car tumbled down a California embankment in what authorities described as a drunken-driving accident that left WILLIE SHOEMAKER a quadriplegic, the former jockey has filed a damage suit against the state, asserting that he was not drunk at the time and that state negligence was to blame for the accident. In a suit filed in Los
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At the Bar; Sinatra's Ex-Lawyer, Thanked by Kitty Kelley, Declines the Honor With a Lawsuit.
NYTimes - over 25 years
There is no greater honor an author can bestow than to list someone in the acknowledgments. It is a chance for people to see their names in print, and on high-quality, acid-free paper rather than the more ephemeral stuff that newspapers use. But it would be an understatement to say that Milton A. (Mickey) Rudin of Beverly Hills, Frank Sinatra's
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How the Supermarket Tabloids Stay Out of Court
NYTimes - about 26 years
Every few months a Hollywood celebrity walks into Vincent Chieffo's law office in Los Angeles, angrily waving a copy of one of the supermarket tabloids, those weekly newspapers that offer readers a feast of gossip, scandal and believe-it-or-not phenomena. Asserting that an article is not true, the celebrity asks about suing the newspaper. Mr.
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Klosterman Sues Express, U.S.F.L.
NYTimes - over 31 years
Don Klosterman, the former president and general manager of the Los Angeles Express, filed suit Tuesday, alleging breach of contract against the team and the United States Football League. The suit, filed in Superior Court, alleges the Express, which had been taken over by the U.S.F.L. due to financial problems last year, violated Klosterman's
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Sale of Indians Is Off, Club President Says
NYTimes - about 36 years
The Cleveland Indians called off the sale of the baseball club yesterday to a group headed by James Nederlander, the New York theater executive, and said that ''we'll just go along the way we have in the past.'' Gabe Paul, president of the Indians, announced that the owners had decided to terminate the agreement in principle reached Oct. 30. He
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Neil Papiano
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 2014
    Age 79
    In February, 2014, Papiano was declared "not eligible to practice law" by order of the State Bar Court of California.
    More Details Hide Details According to court papers filed by his attorney, Papiano has been diagnosed with dementia and also has financial problems. Papiano’s current mental state is outlined in a letter attached to his attorneys’ court papers, in which Dr. Helena Chang Chui states that he has moderate to severe dementia due to Alzheimer’s disease. In the mid-1970s, Papiano was hired by Oakland Athletics owner Charlie Finley to file a restraint-of-trade lawsuit against Major League Baseball and Commissioner Bowie Kuhn. In the Spring of 1976, Finley commenced a "fire sale" of the team's highly paid players, including Reggie Jackson. When Finley sold Vida Blue to the New York Yankees and Joe Rudi and Rollie Fingers to the Boston Red Sox, Kuhn voided the sales as being contrary to the "best interest of baseball." Papiano and Finley lost the case, as the court ruled that "the Commissioner has the authority to determine whether any act, transaction, or practice is not within the best interest of baseball, and upon such determination, to take whatever preventative or remedial action he deems appropriate, whether or not the act, transaction, or practice complies with the Major league Rules or involves moral turpitude." Charles O. Finley vs. Bowie Kuhn, 7th Circuit, 1978. The judge stated that the question before him was not whether he agreed with Kuhn's action, but whether Kuhn had the power to act.
  • 2010
    Age 75
    In 2010, Papiano defended Robert Rudolph, the recipient of a thoroughbred horse named Alison Cat who claimed that he did not purchase the horse, but rather took the horse on consignment to train, race and sell for the owner with a split of profits in excess of $160,000.
    More Details Hide Details Rudolph Weddington, the Plaintiff, prevailed as the jury decided that the horse was either sold to Rudolph or Rudolph stole the horse when he had the Jockey Club registration changed to his name. The horse was placed in a $32,000 claiming race by Rudolph. Weddington successfully had Alison Cat scratched from the race and filed suit against Rudolph. The case was tried in San Diego County Superior Court and the jury awarded Weddington $160,000 alternatively based upon breach of contract or conversion theft. Weddington was represented by attorney Laurence F. Haines of Escondido. After Rudolph appealed, the judgment was upheld in its entirety in March 2012. Other clients include Nederlander Organization, The Thoroughbred Corporation, and Lockheed Martin. Papiano appeared on ESPN SportsCentury twice. In 2000, Papiano became involved in an investigation by the Los Angeles Ethics Commission over what the Los Angeles Times called his "long and controversial" relationship with Los Angeles City Councilman Hal Bernson. According to the Times, Bernson paid Papiano $140,000 for a half-interest in an ocean-view condominium with an assessed value of $387,000. Allegations also arose that Papiano's law firm had provided free legal services to Bernson while the Ethics Commission was investigating Bernson for using officeholder accounts to buy season tickets to the Hollywood Bowl. However, these services were not those provided by Papiano, considered a "volunteer" lawyer, but by two lawyers and a paralegal at the firm who at one point used about 10 percent of their time during certain months of 1996-97 on the Bernson matter.
  • 2007
    Age 72
    In 2007, Papiano represented Robert Raphaelson and two others in an eight-day jury trial in Las Vegas federal court.
    More Details Hide Details Plaintiffs accused Papiano's client of secretly selling jointly-held season breeding rights to stallions—often years in advance—and later fabricating documents to represent to plaintiffs that they were same-year deals. The jury found in favor of plaintiffs and awarded damages of approximately $1.9 million. Coupled with a partial summary judgment of $510,625 entered against the defendants before trial, total damages approaching $2.4 million were awarded, including $1.6 million in punitive damages. Papiano argued his client was forced into secrecy because plaintiff allegedly sabotaged previous deals by wanting to hold out too long for the highest possible price. Papiano also claimed plaintiff owed Raphaelson $160,000, which he said "will probably be a separate lawsuit." Papiano said he was confident the $1.6 million in punitive damages would be reduced by a post-trial motion. Papiano also said: "You’re never happy with damages. But when you get sued for many millions of dollars, and the jury comes down with 280-some thousand dollars -- it sounds like a big number, but not when you are being sued for millions of dollars." Plaintiffs' attorney claimed the actual pre-trial settlement offer was $1,035,625, or $525,000 above the summary judgment damages. In any event, plaintiffs' attorney said that even if damages were reduced, it could hardly be claimed a victory for defendants. Plaintiffs' attorney said: "What do you think is the best outcome: Pay to settle the case … or … have a jury of your peers tell the world that you committed breach of fiduciary duty, conversion and fraud and that you acted with oppression and malice?" Raphaelson's wife, Lucille Raphaelson, was not found liable on any count.
    In 2007, Papiano represented jockey Laffit Pincay Jr. in a lawsuit against an ambulance company (Huntington Ambulance) alleging that Pincay suffered two broken bones in his neck during a riding accident in 2003, and that the ambulance company failed to follow appropriate procedures when its employees allowed Pincay to walk under his own power to the ambulance.
    More Details Hide Details Pincay was awarded $2.7 million. After the award, Papiano said: "This was a justifiable result for the circumstances and the lack of treatment, the jury found that with proper treatment, Laffit would still be riding today."
  • 2006
    Age 71
    In September 2006, the Survivors Network filed a lawsuit accusing Papiano and the priest of malicious prosecution.
    More Details Hide Details In July 2007, the Roman Catholic Archiocese of Los Angeles settled the case. Papiano said the Archdiocese reached settlement in his case without his client's permission. Papiano told the Associated Press: "Here's a good man, a real good man who has always been wonderful to the church who just gets left out of this." At the time of the settlement (which included more than 500 other claims), Cardinal Roger Mahony made a public apology, saying: "There really is no way to go back and give them that innocence that was taken from them. The one thing I wish I could give the victims... I cannot."
  • 2004
    Age 69
    In 2004, Papiano filed a libel action on behalf of a Napa priest in a lawsuit filed against the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Los Angeles stemming from an accusation to the Church that the Monsignor had molested a grade-school girl more than 30 years earlier in Southern California, even though he had never been criminally charged.
    More Details Hide Details The libel action was filed in Los Angeles County Superior Court against the woman who made the accusations, as well as the woman's lawyer and the Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests, a national advocacy group for priest sex abuse victims. Papiano said of the priest: "We're defending his honor." The defendants contended that the libel action was intended to silence victims of priest abuse, a move they said contradicted the U.S. bishops' invitation to victims to come forward. The national director of SNAP said of the suit filed by Papiano: "It's clearly an intimidation tactic." Papiano said that his client wanted the woman, the law firm and SNAP to drop their allegations of abuse and issue apologies. "All they have to do is just walk away now", Papiano was quoted as saying. But if the case progressed, Papiano said he would incur costs that he would attempt to recover from the plaintiffs.
    When Matthau's son succeeded to his father's interests in 2004, the agency alleged that he ceased making payments.
    More Details Hide Details Papiano successfully argued to the Court of Appeal that the arbitration agreement signed by Matthau with the agency was not binding on his son.
  • 2002
    Age 67
    On remand, Pincay elected to pursue the remedy on his California law claim, and judgment was entered in his favor on July 3, 2002., No. 02-56577 (9th Cir.
    More Details Hide Details Nov. 2004). In December 2005, the U.S. Supreme Court denied the defendants' petition for a writ of certiorari. As of February 2006, the horse-racing publication The Blood-Horse reported that Pincay was owed nearly $4.5 million and McCarron just under $2.4 million. http://news.bloodhorse.com/viewstory.asp?id=32182
    In May 2002, Papiano filed a lawsuit on behalf of the Estate of Walter Matthau, seeking $1 million from Columbia Pictures for payments allegedly due for Matthau's work on the 1969 film Cactus Flower and the 1978 film California Suite.
    More Details Hide Details The lawsuit alleged breach of contract and fraud. In 2007, Papiano represented Matthau's son in a suit with the William Morris Agency, which was Matthau's agent from 1960-2000. The agency alleged that, during Matthau's lifetime, he had paid the agency ten percent of his income on contracts negotiated or procured by the agency. The agency also alleged that, after Matthau's death, his wife continued making the payments.
  • 2001
    Age 66
    Born in 2001.
    More Details Hide Details
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