Profile

Nicholas Biwott

Politician + Businessman + Civil Servant
Male
Born 1941
Age 73
Hometown Rift Valley Province
Nationality Kenyan

Kipyator Nicholas Kiprono arap Biwott is a Kenyan businessman, politician and philanthropist. Biwott has served as a civil servant, Member of Parliament and government minister, during which time he has held eight senior ministerial positions, worked alongside Kenya’s first three presidents – Jomo Kenyatta, Daniel arap Moi and Mwai Kibaki – and with many significant public figures in post independence Kenya, including Bruce McKenzie and Tom Mboya.… Read More

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Timeline

Learn about the memorable moments in the evolution of Nicholas Biwott.

CHILDHOOD

1940 Birth Biwott was born in Chebior village, Keiyo District, Rift Valley Province in 1940. … Read More

TWENTIES

1965 25 Years Old Biwott entered government service in 1965 as the District Officer in South Imenti and Tharaki, Meru District (Jan 1965–66). … Read More
1968 28 Years Old Having completed his Master's degree in Australia in 1968, Nicholas Biwott returned to public service in the Ministry of Agriculture, GOK, Personal Assistant to Minister Bruce MacKenzie (1968–1970). … Read More

THIRTIES

1971 31 Years Old In 1971 Nicholas Biwott moved to the Treasury as Senior Secretary under the Minister of Finance and Economic Planning, Mwai Kibaki.
1972 32 Years Old 1 More Event
In 1972 he created and headed the External Aid Division and technical assistance program dealing with external resources, bringing in experts and arranging cultural exchanges. … Read More
1974 34 Years Old 1 More Event
In 1974 Biwott stood as a candidate for the Keiyo South constituency in the general election of that year but was narrowly defeated.
1978 38 Years Old Kenyatta’s death in 1978 saw Daniel arap Moi elevated to the presidency and Nicholas Biwott promoted to Deputy Permanent Secretary in the Office of the President (1978–1979).
1979 39 Years Old Following the election of 1979 (in which he was elected Member of Parliament for 1979 Keiyo South election, a seat he retained until December 2007), Nicholas Biwott returned to the Office of the President but now promoted to Minister of State (1979–1982) with responsibility for science and technology, cabinet affairs, land settlement and immigration. … Read More

FORTIES

1982 42 Years Old In September 1982 he was appointed Minister of Regional Development, Science and Technology. … Read More
1983 43 Years Old In September 1983, Nicholas Biwott was made Minster of Energy and Regional Development and in March 1988 (following a reorganisation of ministry portfolios) he became Minister of Energy, a post he held until January 1991. … Read More

FIFTIES

1990 50 Years Old 1 More Event
Nicholas Biwott’s name has been raised, ‘perhaps unfairly’ by his detractors both inside and outside Kenya regarding several controversies all which have date their origins to the years 1990-91. … Read More
1991 51 Years Old Ten government officials, including Biwott, were held in police custody for questioning for two weeks in November 1991 but a Kenyan Police investigation concluded that there was no 'evidence to support the allegations that Biwott was involved in the disappearance and subsequent death of the late minister Dr. Robert John Ouko'. … Read More
1992 52 Years Old In 1992, 1997, and 2002 he was elected the MP for Keiyo South Constituency. … Read More

LATE ADULTHOOD

2000 60 Years Old In 2000, a Nairobi court awarded Mr Biwott record damages of Sh30 million arising from a case in which he sued a British journalist, Chester Stern, and others for linking him to the Ouko murder in a book entitled 'Dr Iain West's Casebook'. … Read More
2009 69 Years Old Biwott is now but one name on a long list of Kenyan politicians and civil servants associated with the Moi era to have travel restrictions imposed on them by the United States and the UK including most recently, in October 2009, Kenya's Attorney General Amos Wako, in what has been described by Kenya's Foreign Minister Moses Wetang'ula as "megaphone diplomacy".
Original Authors of this text are noted on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nicholas_Biwott.
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