Nikita Mikhalkov
Soviet film director
Nikita Mikhalkov
Nikita Sergeyevich Mikhalkov is a Soviet and Russian filmmaker, actor, and head of the Russian Cinematographers' Union. Mikhalkov was born in Moscow into the distinguished, artistic Mikhalkov family. His great grandfather was the imperial governor of Yaroslavl, whose mother was a Galitzine princess.
Biography
Nikita Mikhalkov's personal information overview.
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News
News abour Nikita Mikhalkov from around the web
Why Russia Can Only Go Backward
Huffington Post - about 1 year
MOSCOW -- The Public Opinion Foundation conducted a survey this month asking Russians two questions: "What was the main event of the year in Russia?" and "What was the main global event of the year?" Noteworthy is that fully 40 percent of the respondents had trouble answering either question. And the most brutal political murder in modern Russia -- the assassination of my father -- did not even figure in the responses. State-controlled television hardly mentions it, with the exception of the first few days after the killing, when commentators spoke of him in contemptuous tones. But the problem is not only the silence of the Kremlin's official propaganda. The problem is the condition of Russian society. A Levada Center survey conducted in March of this year found that one-third of all Russians are indifferent to my father's murder. That is a moral numbness best conveyed by the popular Russian sentiments of "It does not concern me" and "That does not affect me." The well-kno ...
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Huffington Post article
Why Russia Can Only Go Backward
Huffington Post - about 1 year
MOSCOW -- The Public Opinion Foundation conducted a survey this month asking Russians two questions: "What was the main event of the year in Russia?" and "What was the main global event of the year?" Noteworthy is that fully 40 percent of the respondents had trouble answering either question. And the most brutal political murder in modern Russia -- the assassination of my father -- did not even figure in the responses. State-controlled television hardly mentions it, with the exception of the first few days after the killing, when commentators spoke of him in contemptuous tones. But the problem is not only the silence of the Kremlin's official propaganda. The problem is the condition of Russian society. A Levada Center survey conducted in March of this year found that one-third of all Russians are indifferent to my father's murder. That is a moral numbness best conveyed by the popular Russian sentiments of "It does not concern me" and "That does not affect me." The well-kno ...
Article Link:
Huffington Post article
Is Edward Snowden a prisoner in Russia?
Guardian (UK) - about 3 years
In the second exclusive extract from his new book, The Snowden Files, Luke Harding looks at the role of Russia's shadowy intelligence agency, the FSB, in securing the whistleblower's exile – and whether they have cracked his secret files Edward Snowden's prolonged stay in Russia was involuntary. He got stuck in Moscow's Sheremetyevo International Airport when his efforts to transit to a South American country such as Ecuador, Bolivia or Venezuela failed. But it made his own story – his narrative of principled exile and flight – a lot more complicated. It was now easier for critics to paint him not as a whistleblower and political refugee but as a 21st-century Kim Philby, the British defector who sold his country and its secrets to the Soviets. Other critics likened him to Bernon F Mitchell and William H Martin, two NSA analysts who defected in 1960 to the Soviet Union, and had a miserable time there for the rest of their lives. The analogies were unfair. Snowden was no traitor. But, ...
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Guardian (UK) article
Wes Hurley: Growing Up Gay in Russia
Huffington Post - over 3 years
I was around 12 or 13 years old. It was a time of big change and excitement. My family had had anti-Communist tendencies for years, so when the Soviet Union collapsed, we were thrilled and gratified. My classmates stopped wearing their red neck scarves and Lenin pins, which I had ditched long before it became acceptable. People started to profess their religious beliefs, openly embrace Western culture, and dream of earning a better living in the new capitalist society. For a brief time, freedom and hopefulness were in the air. Then the darker side of change became apparent. The Communist leaders who had resisted reforms for so long but suddenly were eager to embrace them had the same old agenda in mind: to take for themselves. Using the unsavory practice called "privatization," they started to grab -- literally steal -- public property and claim it as their own. These titans of the political elite turned government stores, stadiums, cemeteries, and parks into their own ...
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Huffington Post article
Win a copy of Burnt By The Sun 2 on DVD
The Citizen - over 3 years
Following the hugely successful Academy Award winning Burnt By The Sun comes its sequel Burnt By The Sun 2, the epic action-packed Russian drama which follows the Nazi invasion of Russia, set in the Eastern Front of World War II, which makes its DVD debut courtesy of Arrow Films. Directed and starring the renowned Oscar winning filmmaker Nikita Mikhalkov, who plays a purged red army general Sergei Kotov who escapes death after German bombers blow up his gulag and is soon left defending the motherland from fascist tanks. Burnt By The Sun 2 had one of the largest production budgets ever seen in Russian cinema and includes the remarkable Citadel, which was the official Russian Oscar entry of 2011 and Exodus. It comes to DVD on the 8 July 2013 courtesy of Arrow Films. Exodus Set in 1941 Soviet Union leader Joseph Stalin is terrorizing the people ofRussia while the Nazis are advancing. Russian officer Kotov, who miraculously survived the death sentence in Stalin's Purge, is now fighting on ...
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The Citizen article
Nikita Mikhalkov moves closer to construction of Palace of Film Festivals in ... - Screen International
Google News - over 5 years
Nikita Mikhalkov, head of the Russian Cinematographers' Union and President of the International Moscow Film Festival, has moved another step closer to the implementation of one of the most ambitious projects in the history of the Russian
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Google News article
Mikhalkov Could Get Less Royalties - The Moscow Times
Google News - over 5 years
The union, which is headed by film director Nikita Mikhalkov, did not respond to a request for comment on Wednesday. Onishchuk said that even if the proposal goes though, the total sum to be collected is unlikely to decrease significantly because the
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Google News article
Rustam Ibragimbekov becomes honorary guest of Golden Orange Film Festival - vestnik kavkaza
Google News - over 5 years
Rustam Ibragimbekov, together with Nikita Mikhalkov, makers of "Burnt by the Sun", a film that had won an Oskar as the best foreign film in 1994, will become an honorary guest of the 48th International Film Festival the Golden Orange in Antalya
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Google News article
Cate Blanchett's Russian role, or Chekhov with a glass of vodka - The Voice of Russia
Google News - over 5 years
One of her favourite films, the actress says, is An Unfinished Piece for the Player Piano by celebrated Russian director Nikita Mikhalkov which is a screen version of Chekhov. Her love for Chekhov began in her student years
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Google News article
Russia's main clock - The Voice of Russia
Google News - over 5 years
The same poet who wrote the lyrics of the 1943 anthem, Sergey Mikhalkov (the father of the renowned film directors Nikita Mikhalkov and Andrey Mikhalkov-Konchalovskiy), wrote new words for the old music. Now, the Kremlin clock performs this new anthem
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Google News article
FP Passport: Medvedev eyes a career in rap? - Foreign Policy (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Some recent stories include a report about a "flasher" on producer Nikita Mikhalkov's car and the trial of former Yukos head Mikhail Khodorkovsky. And while the president laughed out loud to the rap about Mikhalkov, the "recital" about Khodorkovsky (in
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Google News article
Medvedev, ce super-héros de la Russie - L'Express
Google News - over 5 years
Il a déjà mis en scène les deux hommes politiques ensemble, en short et maillot de tennis, sur des affiches collées dans la capitale, Barack Obama ou Mouammar Kadhafi, le réalisateur Nikita Mikhalkov ou encore l'homme politique Mikhaïl Prokhorov
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Nikita Mikhalkov
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 2011
    Age 65
    The film was selected in 2011 as the Russian entry for the Best Foreign Language Film at the 84th Academy Awards.
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  • 2010
    Age 64
    Mikhalkov's vertical of power-style leadership of the Cinematographers' Union has been criticized by many prominent Russian filmmakers and critics as autocratic, and encouraged many members to leave and form a rival union in April 2010.
    More Details Hide Details Since 2015 Mikhalkov is banned from entering Ukraine because of his support for the 2014 Russian annexation of Crimea.
  • 2008
    Age 62
    In 2008, he visited Serbia to support Tomislav Nikolić who was running as the ultra-nationalist candidate for the Serb presidency at the time.
    More Details Hide Details Mikhalkov took part in a meeting of "Nomocanon", a Serb youth organization which denies war crimes committed by Serbs in the 1992–99 Yugoslav wars. In a speech given to the organization, Mikhalkov spoke about a "war against Orthodoxy" wherein he cited Orthodox Christianity as "the main force which opposes cultural and intellectual McDonald's". In response to his statement, a journalist asked Mikhalkov: "Which is better, McDonald's or Stalinism?" Mikhalkov answered: "That depends on the person". Mikhalkov has described himself as a monarchist.
  • 2007
    Age 61
    Mikhalkov has been a strong supporter of Russian president Vladimir Putin. In October 2007, Mikhalkov, who produced a television program for Putin's 55th birthday, co-signed an open letter asking Putin not to step down after the expiry of his term in office.
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    In 2007, Mikhalkov directed and starred in 12, a Russian adaptation of Sidney Lumet's court drama 12 Angry Men.
    More Details Hide Details In September 2007, 12 received a special Golden Lion for the “consistent brilliance” of its work and was praised by many critics at the Venice Film Festival. In 2008, 12 was named as a nominee for Best Foreign Language Film for the 80th Academy Awards. Commenting on the nomination, Mikhalkov said, "I am overjoyed that the movie has been noticed in the United States and, what's more, was included in the shortlist of five nominees. This is a significant event for me." He also served as the executive producer of an epic film 1612. Mikhalkov presented his "epic drama" Burnt by the Sun 2 at the 2010 Cannes Film Festival, but did not receive any awards.
  • FIFTIES
  • 2005
    Age 59
    In 2005, Mikhalkov resumed his acting career, starring in three brand-new movies – The Councillor of State, a Fandorin mystery film which broke the Russian box-office records, Zhmurki, a noir-drenched comedy about the Russian Mafia, and Krzysztof Zanussi's Persona non grata.
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  • 1996
    Age 50
    In 1996, he was the head of the jury at the 46th Berlin International Film Festival.
    More Details Hide Details Mikhalkov used the critical and financial triumph of Burnt by the Sun to raise $25 million for his most epic venture to date, The Barber of Siberia (1998). The film, which was screened out of competition at the 1999 Cannes Film Festival, was designed as a patriotic extravaganza for domestic consumption. It featured Julia Ormond and Oleg Menshikov, who regularly appears in Mikhalkov's films, in the leading roles. The director himself appeared as Tsar Alexander III of Russia. The film received the Russian State Prize and spawned rumours about Mikhalkov's presidential ambitions. The director, however, chose to administer the Russian cinema industry. Despite much opposition from rival directors, he was elected the President of the Russian Society of Cinematographers and has managed the Moscow Film Festival since 2000. He also set the Russian Academy Golden Eagle Award in opposition to the traditional Nika Award.
  • FORTIES
  • 1987
    Age 41
    The film was highly praised, and Mastroianni received the Best Actor Prize at the 1987 Cannes Film Festival and an Academy Award nomination for his performance.
    More Details Hide Details Mikhalkov's next film, Urga (1992, a.k.a. Close to Eden), set in the little-known world of the Mongols, received the Golden Lion at the Venice Film Festival and was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film. Mikhalkov's Anna: 6–18 (1993) documents his daughter Anna as she grows from childhood to maturity. Mikhalkov's most famous production to date, Burnt by the Sun (1994), was steeped in the paranoid atmosphere of Joseph Stalin's Great Terror. The film received the Grand Prize at Cannes and the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film, among many other honours. To date, Burnt by the Sun remains the highest-grossing film to come out of the former Soviet Union.
  • THIRTIES
  • 1978
    Age 32
    In 1978, while starring in his brother's epic film Siberiade, Mikhalkov made Five Evenings, a love story about a couple separated by World War II, who meet again after eighteen years.
    More Details Hide Details Mikhalkov's next film, Oblomov (1980), with Oleg Tabakov in the title role, is based on Ivan Goncharov's classic novel about a lazy young nobleman who refuses to leave his bed. Family Relations (1981) is a comedy about a provincial woman in Moscow dealing with the tangled relationships of her relatives. Without Witnesses (1983) tracks a long night's conversation between a woman (Irina Kupchenko) and her ex-husband (Mikhail Ulyanov) when they are accidentally locked in a room. The film won the Prix FIPRESCI at the 13th Moscow International Film Festival. In the early 1980s, Mikhalkov resumed his acting career, appearing in Eldar Ryazanov's immensely popular Station for Two (1982) and A Cruel Romance (1984). At that period, he also played Henry Baskerville in the Soviet screen version of The Hound of the Baskervilles. He also starred in many of his own films, including At Home Among Strangers, A Slave of Love, and An Unfinished Piece for Player Piano.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1974
    Age 28
    Mikhalkov had appeared in more than 20 films, including his brother's Uncle Vanya (1972), before he co-wrote, directed and starred in his first feature, At Home Among Strangers in 1974, an Ostern set just after the 1920s civil war in Russia.
    More Details Hide Details Mikhalkov established an international reputation with his second feature, A Slave of Love (1976). Set in 1917, it followed the efforts of a film crew to make a silent melodrama in a resort town while the Revolution rages around them. The film, based upon the last days of Vera Kholodnaya, was highly acclaimed upon its release in the U.S. Mikhalkov's next film, An Unfinished Piece for Player Piano (1977) was adapted by Mikhalkov from Chekhov's early play, Platonov, and won the first prize at the San Sebastian Film Festival.
  • 1968
    Age 22
    He directed his first short film in 1968, I'm Coming Home, and another for his graduation, A Quiet Day at the End of the War in 1970.
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  • 1967
    Age 21
    Mikhalkov's first wife was renowned Russian actress Anastasiya Vertinskaya, whom he married on 6 March 1967.
    More Details Hide Details They had a son, Stepan, born in September 1966. With his second wife, former model Tatyana, he had a son Artyom (born 8 December 1975), and daughters Anna (born 1974) and Nadya (born 27 September 1986). Mikhalkov is actively involved in Russian politics. He is known for his at times Russian nationalist and Slavophile views. In October 2006, Mikhalkov visited Serbia, giving moral support to Serbia's sovereignty over Kosovo.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1945
    Born
    Born on October 21, 1945.
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