Novak Djokovic
Serbian tennis player
Novak Djokovic
Novak Djokovic is a Serbian professional tennis player who is currently ranked the World No. 1 by the ATP and is ranked the year-end World No. 1 for both 2011 and 2012. He is considered by many to be one of the greatest tennis players of all time.
Biography
Novak Djokovic's personal information overview.
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News
News abour Novak Djokovic from around the web
Tennis-Djokovic the exception as he clocks in for national duty
Yahoo News - 23 days
By Martyn Herman LONDON, Feb 2 (Reuters) - Novak Djokovic will be a notable exception this week after clocking on for Davis Cup duty for Serbia when a host of other big names are resting up after their Australian Open exertions. World number two Djokovic is the only member of the top 10 in action over the weekend's ties although he perhaps needs some sharpening after a shock second-round loss to Uzbekistan's Denis Istomin in Melbourne left him with more time on his hands at the start of the season that he was anticipating. Which is good news for Serbia as they host a young Russian side in a World Group first round tie in Nis.
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Yahoo News article
Federer, Nadal clash in blockbuster Aussie final
Yahoo News - 28 days
Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal will collide in a hugely anticipated Australian Open final on Sunday after both veterans beat the odds to open a new chapter in their thrilling Grand Slam rivalry. Federer, 35, will become the oldest Grand Slam finalist in 43 years, while Nadal, 30, has defied a series of injuries to reach his first major title match since he won the 2014 French Open. It's a final that nobody saw coming but after the early exits of Andy Murray and Novak Djokovic, the old rivals have seized their opportunity with both hands.
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Yahoo News article
Federer, Williams sisters set sights on final
Yahoo News - about 1 month
Roger Federer will attempt to reach his first Grand Slam final since 2015 at the Australian Open on Thursday, while Serena and Venus Williams are both gunning for the women's title match. Federer's major-winning days seemed over after first Novak Djokovic and then Andy Murray emerged at the top of the pecking order, but the Swiss legend, 35, has surprised everyone with his run to the semis. With Djokovic and Murray long gone, fellow Swiss Stan Wawrinka is blocking Federer's path to Sunday's title match, where he intends to become the oldest major finalist since a 39-year-old Ken Rosewall at the 1974 US Open.
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Agassi backs Djokovic to bounce back after Australian Open loss
Yahoo News - about 1 month
Tennis legend Andre Agassi on Saturday backed misfiring Novak Djokovic to pull out of his form slump after he crashed out of the Australian Open. Agassi, describing Djokovic as "one of the greats", said he could soon be back to his best, comparing the Serb's nosedive to his own troubles in the 1990s. Djokovic, 29 and seeking a record seventh Australian Open title, suffered the worst in a run of upsets when he lost to 117th-ranked Denis Istomin in the second round.
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Give Djokovic a break, Murray tells Serb's critics
Yahoo News - about 1 month
Andy Murray has sprung to the defense of his great rival Novak Djokovic after the Serb's surprise exit at the Australian Open. Djokovic, toppled as world number one by Murray at the end of last year, was sent packing by wildcard Denis Istomin in the second round to end his hopes of a seventh title at Melbourne Park. It was 12-times grand slam champion Djokovic's earliest loss at a grand slam in nearly a decade and fueled talk that the 29-year-old is showing signs of a decline.
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Yahoo News article
On Tennis: Novak Djokovic’s Invincibility Takes Another Hit, Opening a Door for Others
NYTimes - about 1 month
The Australian Open’s No. 2 seed is out, and his former coach, Boris Becker, feels a recent shift in the player’s priorities has affected his intensity.
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NYTimes article
Why this is the most shocking loss of Novak Djokovic's career
ABC News - about 1 month
MELBOURNE, Australia -- The Day 4 schedule said Novak Djokovic was playing a journeyman pro from Uzbekistan in his second-round match at the Australian Open. But for a while now, Djokovic has been competing against the ghost of his past self, too. Over the past three years -- especially the first six months of 2016 -- he was the most ruthlessly efficient winner in tennis. Then Thursday's match started and, once again, Djokovic found himself struggling to reach his past standards -- this time absorbing the most shocking loss he has taken in years, at the Grand Slam tournament he has owned like no other. "On any given day you can lose -- nothing is impossible," Djokovic said with a shrug after Denis Istomin, the 117th-ranked player in the world, outlasted him in a spectacularly played 7-6 (8), 5-7, 2-6, 7-6 (5), 6-4 win that took 4 hours, 48 minutes to complete. How epic an upset was this? Istomin gained his way into this major only via a wild-card berth....
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ABC News article
Djokovic out in 2nd Round, Loses to Istomin in Melbourne
ABC News - about 1 month
Novak Djokovic won't be setting the Australian Open record for most men's titles this year, losing to wild-card entry Denis Istomin in the second round
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ABC News article
Novak Djokovic upset by Denis Istomin in second round of Australian Open
LATimes - about 1 month
Novak Djokovic won't be setting the Australian Open record for most men's titles this year after a shocking second-round loss to wild-card entry Denis Istomin on Thursday.  It was the earliest loss at a major since 2008 for six-time Australian Open champion Djokovic, who had never dropped a set...
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LATimes article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Novak Djokovic
    FORTIES
  • 2016
    Following his historic 2016 Australian Open victory, Djokovic donated $20,000.00 to Melbourne City Mission's early childhood education programme to help disadvantaged children.
    More Details Hide Details Finals: 21 (12 titles, 9 runner-ups) Year–End Championships finals: 5 (5 titles)
    Djokovic holds the best match winning rate (83.00%) in Open Era, as of August 2016.
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    Djokovic defeated Andy Murray in the final of the 2016 French Open in four sets, making him the reigning champion of all four major tournaments, a historic feat the media dubbed the "Nole Slam."
    More Details Hide Details With his French Open triumph, Djokovic became the 8th player in history (and the second oldest) to achieve a Career Grand Slam, the third player in history to hold all four Grand Slam titles at the same time, and the first player to win $100 million in prize money. However, at Wimbledon, his major win streak came to an end in the third-round when he lost to American Sam Querrey in four sets. It was his earliest exit in a Grand Slam since the 2009 French Open. In late July, he returned to form by winning his fourth Rogers cup title, and 30th Masters 1000 title overall, without dropping a set. In August, Novak is beaten in the first round of the Olympic men's singles in Rio de Janeiro by Juan Martin del Potro. It was Djokovic's first opening round defeat since January 2009, when Ernest Gulbis defeated him at the 2009 Brisbane International. In the final slam of the year, the US Open, Djokovic advanced to the final but was defeated by Stan Wawrinka in four sets.
    In addition, 2016 marked the third consecutive year that Djokovic swept both Indian Wells and the Miami Open, the first male singles player to ever do that.
    More Details Hide Details This was also the fourth time in his career Djokovic won both Miami and Indian Wells back-to-back. His finals win in Miami saw Novak extend his lead in the rankings over world number 2 Andy Murray to 8,725 points, and surpassed Roger Federer to become the all-time leading prize money winner on the ATP tour with career earnings of $98.2 million. After an early round exit at the Monte Carlo Masters, Djokovic quickly bounced back by winning the Madrid title for the second time in his career with a three set victory over Murray. They met again in the Rome Masters final one week later with Murray the victor, despite a sluggish performance, Djokovic defeated Nadal and Nishikori in two long quarterfinals and semifinals.
    On 3 April 2016, Novak won the 2016 Miami Open for the third consecutive year, and did so without dropping a set en route to his sixth career Miami Open title, tying him with Andre Agassi for most ever Miami Open men's singles titles.
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    In 2016, he became the eighth player in history to achieve the Career Grand Slam; by winning the 2016 French Open, Djokovic became the third man to hold all four major titles at once, the first since Rod Laver in 1969, and the first ever to do so on three different surfaces.
    More Details Hide Details Djokovic stands alone with an all-time record of 30 Masters 1000 series titles. Djokovic's records include breaking the single-season record with six masters titles in 2015, winning 31 consecutive ATP World Tour Masters 1000 series matches, playing in the finals at all nine ATP Masters 1000 tournaments (shared with Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal), and being the only player to win eight of the nine events (and at least twice). Among other titles, he has won the ATP World Tour Finals five times and was on the Serbian team which won the 2010 Davis Cup. He also won the Bronze medal in men's singles at the 2008 Summer Olympics. Djokovic is the first Serbian player to be ranked No. 1 by the ATP and the first male player representing Serbia to win a Grand Slam singles title. Djokovic has won numerous awards, including the 2012, 2015, and 2016 Laureus World Sports Award for Sportsman of the Year, 2011 BBC Overseas Sports Personality of the Year, five-time ITF World Champion, and four-time ATP year-end number 1. He is a recipient of the Order of St. Sava, the Order of Karađorđe's Star and the Order of the Republika Srpska.
    Serbian press reported in February 2016 about Djokovic's uncle buying hectares of arable land on their company's behalf in the Lipovac village near Topola in Serbia's Šumadija region with a view of turning it into vineyards and getting into the winemaking business.
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    In June 2016, a panel of more than forty ESPN experts ranked Djokovic as number eight on their top twenty all-time combined list of both male and female tennis players; he was number five among the males, behind Federer, Laver, Sampras, and Borg.
    More Details Hide Details Djokovic is widely considered to be one of the greatest returners in the history of the sport, an accolade given to him even by Andre Agassi, who was considered to be the best returner ever. Though staying clear of best ever conversations, tennis coach Nick Bollettieri has continually been praising Djokovic as the "most complete player ever" and the "most perfect player of all time":
    Andrew Castle stated in January 2016 that Djokovic is "undoubtedly moving towards being considered the sport's all-time greatest player".
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    At the 2016 US Open, Wawrinka beat Djokovic in a Grand Slam final for the second time.
    More Details Hide Details Suffering from a foot injury for the latter stages of the match, Djokovic lost in four sets. He did not attribute his loss to the injury, but rather to Wawrinka's courageous play at decisive moments in the match. Contrary to most high-profile rivalries, they have played doubles together. Despite Djokovic's 19-5 overall record against Wawrinka, Wawrinka leads Djokovic 2-0 in Grand Slam finals and 3-2 in all ATP finals. During Djokovic's run of eight appearances at Grand Slam finals from 2014 Wimbledon through the 2016 US Open, his only two losses came at the hands of Wawrinka. Moreover, in all of Djokovic's Grand Slam championship matches, Wawrinka is the only opponent he has not defeated and the only opponent outside the Big Four who has defeated him.
    At the apex of the clay court season, the 2016 French Open, Djokovic and Murray met once again at the final.
    More Details Hide Details Despite losing the first set 3–6, Djokovic went on to win the next three sets 6–1, 6–2, 6–4 and claim his maiden French Open title. This win completed Djokovic's Career Grand Slam and denied Murray his first French Open title. In this matchup Djokovic leads 19–5, however the two have contested numerous close matches, including four five-setters at Grand Slam level. Wawrinka and Djokovic have played three consecutive Australian Open years, each match going to five sets, and a five-setter in the US Open: in the 2013 Australian Open fourth round, which Djokovic won 12–10 in a fifth set; at the 2013 US Open semifinals, which Djokovic won 6–4 in a fifth set; and at the 2014 Australian Open quarterfinals, which Wawrinka won 9–7 in a close fifth set. Wawrinka's win broke Djokovic's impressive run of 14 consecutive semifinals in Grand Slam play, ended a 28-match winning streak, and prevented Djokovic from capturing a record fifth Australian Open crown. Djokovic got revenge in the 2015 Australian Open, winning 6–0 in the fifth set, but again it went the distance. At the 2015 French Open final, Wawrinka defeated Djokovic in four sets to claim his second major title. In 2015, Djokovic defeated Wawrinka at the Paris Masters.
    One week later, however, Murray comfortably beat Djokovic in straight sets in the 2016 Internazionali BNL d'Italia final, denying Djokovic his 30th Masters 1000 crown and interrupting his path to becoming the first player to break through the 100 million dollar prize money mark.
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    In the 2016 clay court season, Djokovic and Murray met in the final of the 2016 Mutua Madrid Open, where Djokovic captured his record breaking 29th Masters 1000 title in three sets.
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    At the 2016 Australian Open final, in a rematch of the previous final, Djokovic won in three sets and captured his sixth Australian Open title.
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    The two would also meet in the 2016 Australian Open semifinals, where Djokovic played virtually flawless tennis in the first two sets to eventually claim a 6–1, 6–2, 3–6, 6–3 victory en route to capturing a record 6th Australian Open and his 11th Grand Slam title.
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  • 2015
    In August 2015, Djokovic was appointed a UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador.
    More Details Hide Details The foundation partnered with the World Bank in August 2015 to promote early childhood education in Serbia.
    In late August 2015, ahead of the 2015 US Open, shortly after his appointment as the UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador was announced, Djokovic appeared on All In with Chris Hayes on MSNBC, also publicizing his foundation's partnership with the World Bank to promote early childhood development.
    More Details Hide Details Two weeks later, the day after his US Open win, Djokovic went on another blitz of the New York City-based media. Starting with the morning shows — with a return to NBC's Today for an in-studio interview with Matt Lauer, Savannah Guthrie, and Carson Daly followed by a return to CBS This Morning, this time in studio, with Charlie Rose, Gayle King, and Norah O'Donnell, and finally a guest spot on Live! with Kelly and Michael. Later in the day he went on The Late Show with Stephen Colbert late-night comedy programme for a walk-on appearance that included firing a serve at Stephen Colbert who hid behind Captain America's shield. Djokovic is also very popular on video sharing sites due to his famous imitations of other tennis players such as Maria Sharapova, Rafael Nadal, Serena Williams and Ana Ivanovic. In 2007, Djokovic founded the Novak Djokovic Foundation. The organization's mission is to help children from disadvantaged communities to grow up and develop in stimulating and safe environments.
    His 2015 Wimbledon win got him a spot via a live linkup on CBS This Morning where he was interviewed by Charlie Rose and Gayle King.
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    In February 2015, following his 2015 Australian Open win, Djokovic made a return appearance on RTS' Svedok for another hour-long sitdown with Nenad Lj.
    More Details Hide Details Stefanović in prime time.
    At the 2015 French Open, Djokovic finally defeated nine-time champion and five-time consecutive defending champion at Roland Garros, thus ending Nadal's 39-match win streak at the French Open.
    More Details Hide Details He became only the second man in history to have defeated Nadal at the tournament (after Robin Soderling in 2009), and the first to do so in straight sets.
  • 2014
    Before the 2014 US Open, Djokovic went on the Late Show with David Letterman on 19 August 2014.
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    The two met again during the finals of the 2014 Wimbledon Championships with Djokovic emerging victorious after a 5 set match and with the victory reclaiming the world number one spot from Nadal. Federer withdrew from the 2014 ATP World Tour final and Djokovic successfully defended his title, the first walkover in a final in the tournament's 45-year history. In the 2015 Wimbledon Championships, despite "an extraordinary second-set tiebreaker in which Federer saved seven set points to level the match" at 1–1, Djokovic went on to claim a 3–1 victory and even the lifetime record between the two players.
    More Details Hide Details The two met again in another Grand Slam final in 2015, this time at the 2015 US Open, where Djokovic defeated Federer in 4 tight sets to claim his second US Open title and tenth Grand Slam.
  • 2013
    The two met in the final of the 2013 Wimbledon Championships, where second seed Murray defeated Djokovic in straight sets, the first time since 2010 that Djokovic had failed to win a set in a Grand Slam match.
    More Details Hide Details In the final of the 2015 Paris Masters, Djokovic triumphed in two sets and became the first man to win six Masters tournaments in one season.
    Djokovic began the year with a warmup tournament win, the 2013 Mubadala World Tennis Championship.
    More Details Hide Details At the Australian Open, he won his first four matches in straight sets, against Lukáš Lacko, Leonardo Mayer, Denis Istomin and number 15 seed Fabio Fognini respectively. He met Wawrinka in the quarterfinals of the tournament, the second consecutive year the two had met at the event. Despite coming back from two sets to one down, Djokovic fell 9–7 in the fifth set, ending his 25–match winning streak in Melbourne, as well as his streak of 14 consecutive Grand Slam tournament semifinals. The week of 27 January marked the first time since 2011 that Djokovic has not been a Grand Slam title holder. Djokovic also would play in the Dubai Tennis Championships but lost to eventual champion Roger Federer in the semifinals. However, Djokovic would avenge his loss to Federer, winning his third Indian Wells Masters title, beating Federer in the final. Continuing his good run, he beat world No. 1 Nadal in the final of the Miami Masters in straight sets. Suffering from a wrist injury which hampered him throughout the Monte-Carlo Masters, Djokovic lost the semifinals to Federer in straight sets. After returning from injury, Djokovic won his third Rome title by beating Nadal in the final of the Italian Open. He subsequently donated the $500,000 in prize money that he had received to the victims of the 2014 Southeast Europe floods.
    In the finals of the 2013 Wimbledon Championships, Djokovic lost to Murray in straight sets.
    More Details Hide Details At the Rogers Cup, he lost to Nadal in the semifinal in three sets. Later, Djokovic lost to Isner in the quarterfinals in Cincinnati. Djokovic went on to reach the US Open final, where he met Nadal for the 37th time in his career (a new open era record). He went on to lose in four sets. In early October, Djokovic collected his fourth Beijing title by defeating Nadal in the final in straight sets. He also collected his second Shanghai Rolex Masters title, extending his winning streak to 20–0 over the last 2 seasons at the hard court Asian swing of the tour. Djokovic won his 16 Masters 1000 title in Paris at the end of the season, beating David Ferrer in the final. At the 2013 ATP World Tour Finals Djokovic retained the trophy, beating Nadal in straight sets.
    On 2 March 2013, Djokovic won the thirty-sixth professional single's title of his career by defeating Tomáš Berdych in the final of the Dubai Tennis Championships.
    More Details Hide Details Another solid week of tennis saw Djokovic reach the semifinals at the BNP Paribas Open in Indian Wells, before losing to del Potro, bringing an end to his twenty-two match winning streak. The following week, Djokovic went into the Miami Masters as defending champion, but lost in the fourth round to Tommy Haas in straight sets. In April, Djokovic played for Serbia as the country faced the United States in the Davis Cup quarterfinals. Djokovic clinched the tie for his team by defeating John Isner and Sam Querrey. Later that month, he defeated eight-time champion Nadal in straight sets in the final of the Monte-Carlo Rolex Masters to clinch his first title in Monte Carlo. In May, he was defeated by Grigor Dimitrov in three sets in the second round of the Mutua Madrid Open in Madrid. The following week, he lost to Berdych at the quarterfinal stage of the Rome Masters.
  • 2012
    At the 2012 French Open, Djokovic faced Nadal in the final.
    More Details Hide Details For the second time in tennis history, two opposing tennis players played four consecutive Grand Slams finals against each other. They also became the only players in history, except for Venus and Serena Williams, to have faced the same opponent in the finals of each of the four different Grand Slam events. Nadal eventually won in four sets after multiple rain delays that forced the final to be concluded on the following Monday afternoon. In 2013, Djokovic defeated Nadal in straight sets in the final of the Monte-Carlo Rolex Masters to clinch his first title in Monte Carlo. This was his third clay win against Nadal. At the 2013 French Open semifinal, Nadal defeated Djokovic to up his record to 20–15 against Djokovic, and again at the 2013 Rogers Cup semifinal. On 9 September 2013, Djokovic lost to Nadal in the 2013 US Open finals in four sets. In 2014, Djokovic defeated Nadal in 3 sets at the Internazionali BNL d'Italia Masters 1000 tournament in Rome to claim his 3rd title there. At the 2014 French Open, they played in the final, with Djokovic attempting to capture the Career Grand Slam. Nadal won in four sets to capture the French Open for the ninth time.
    At the 2012 Monte-Carlo Rolex Masters in April, Nadal finally beat Djokovic for the first time since November 2010.
    More Details Hide Details They had met in seven finals from January 2011 to January 2012, all of which Djokovic won. In the final at Monte Carlo, an in-form Nadal crushed Djokovic. Nadal again defeated Djokovic in the final of the Rome Masters tournament.
    In 2012, Djokovic defeated Nadal in the Australian Open final which made Nadal the first player to lose in three consecutive Grand Slam finals.
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    Because of his achievements in the 2012 season, Djokovic was named the 2012 ITF World Champion in men's singles by the International Tennis Federation.
    More Details Hide Details Djokovic began the 2013 season by defeating Murray in the final of the 2013 Australian Open to win a record third consecutive Australian Open trophy and the sixth major of his career. A week later, he participated in a Davis Cup match against Belgium, where he defeated Olivier Rochus in straight sets to give the Serbian team a 2–0 lead.
    On 12 November 2012, Djokovic won the 2012 ATP World Tour Finals by defeating Federer in the final.
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    On 2 August 2012, Djokovic defeated French fifth seed Tsonga and advanced to the semifinals of Olympics, where he was beaten by Murray in straight sets.
    More Details Hide Details In the bronze medal match he lost to Del Potro, finishing 4th. He successively defended his Rogers Cup title, dropping just a single set to Tommy Haas. Following the Rogers Cup, Djokovic would make the finals of the Cincinnati Masters but lost to Roger Federer in straight sets. At the US Open on 9 September, Djokovic reached his third consecutive final at Flushing Meadows by beating fourth-seeded David Ferrer in a match suspended a day earlier due to rain. He then lost the final to Murray in five sets. Djokovic went on to defend his China Open title, defeating Tsonga in straight sets. The following week he won the Shanghai Masters by defeating Murray in the final. With Federer's withdrawal from the Paris Masters, Djokovic was guaranteed to regain his world No. 1 ranking.
    At the 2012 Summer Olympics in London, Djokovic was chosen as the flag bearer for Serbia.
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    Djokovic reached his maiden French Open final in 2012 by defeating Federer, reaching the finals of all four majors consecutively.
    More Details Hide Details Djokovic had the chance to become the first man since Rod Laver in 1969 to hold all four major titles at once, having won last year's Wimbledon and US Open titles as well as this year's Australian Open, but was beaten by Nadal in the final in four sets. Following the French Open, Djokovic was unsuccessful in defending his Wimbledon title from the prior year, losing to Roger Federer in four sets in the semifinals.
    Djokovic also lost in straight sets to Nadal at the Rome Masters 2012 final.
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    On 12 November 2012, Djokovic won the 2012 ATP World Tour Finals by defeating Roger Federer in straight sets in the final.
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    On 6 July 2012, Djokovic lost to Federer in the Wimbledon semifinal.
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    Andre Agassi stated in September 2012 that Federer, Nadal and Djokovic "may very well be the greatest three players to ever play tennis".
    More Details Hide Details In his September 2013 men's greatest players of all-time list, International Business Times writer Jason Le Miere put the Serb in seventh place. In April 2015, Henman offered another comment on Djokovic's standing among the all-time greats, saying "it's only a matter of time before he is considered alongside Federer and Nadal as one of the greatest players of all time". Having proclaimed him "one of the all-time greats" in November 2014, John McEnroe put Djokovic in all-time top five following his 2015 Wimbledon win, Djokovic's ninth Grand Slam tournament title: "My top four are Laver, Sampras, Roger and Nadal but Novak is at number five and rising".
    According to Tim Henman's June 2012 statement, Djokovic is "probably a top eight player in tennis history".
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    It was Djokovic's fifth win over Tsonga in 2012.
    More Details Hide Details Their most recent Grand Slam tournament meeting was in the quarter-finals of the 2016 US Open. Djokovic won after Tsonga retired while two sets to love down. Following his tremendous success in the 2011 season, Djokovic began to feature on all-time greatest lists. In late 2011, Rod Laver chose Djokovic as number six in his top ten male players of the Open Era.
    They met again two months later at the Olympics, with Djokovic winning in straight sets in the quarterfinals. They met in the final of the 2012 China Open, with Djokovic once again victorious in straight sets.
    More Details Hide Details The pair were drawn in the same pool for the 2012 ATP World Tour Finals. Djokovic defeated Tsonga in his first (of three) round robin matches.
    At the 2012 French Open, Djokovic and Tsonga met again in an important quarterfinals match, with Djokovic prevailing in five sets after more than four hours of play.
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    Murray and Djokovic met again in 2012 at the London 2012 Olympic Games, with Murray winning in straight sets.
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    Djokovic and Murray also played an almost five-hour-long semifinal match in the 2012 Australian Open, which Djokovic won 7–5 in the fifth set after Murray led two sets to one.
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    Their most notable match in this category was a three set thriller at the final of the 2012 Shanghai Masters, in which Murray held five championship point opportunities in the second set; however, Djokovic saved each of them, forcing a deciding set.
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    It was announced in late 2012 that Djokovic had purchased the entire existing 2013 production of donkey cheese, which is produced by a single farm in Serbia.
    More Details Hide Details It was believed that it was done to ensure a reliable supply for his chain of restaurants in Serbia. One week later, it was proven that the story was exaggerated. Banja Luka in neighbouring Republika Srpska got its Novak Café & Restaurant location on 16 October 2015 within Hotel Trešnja on Banj hill. In February 2008, the company reached an agreement with local authorities in the city of Kragujevac about jointly entering into a real estate development deal that was to include 4 hectares of city-owned land at Veliki Park being developed into a tennis centre with 14 courts. But by 2010 the company pulled out of these plans. In March 2008, Family Sport won a municipal authority-organized tender in Novi Beograd by submitting an €11 million bid for the 3.8 hectares of land located in Ivan Ribar neighbourhood; with the ambitious plan to build a big tennis centre there. As of spring 2013, construction is yet to commence.
    After Djokovic's contract with CAA Sports expired during summer 2012, he decided to switch representation, announcing IMG Worldwide as his new representatives in December 2012.
    More Details Hide Details In 2005, as Djokovic moved up the tennis rankings, he ventured into the business world. Most of these activities are channeled through Family Sport, a legal entity in Serbia founded and run by members of his immediate family. Registered as a limited liability company, Family Sport initially focused on hospitality, specifically the restaurant business, by establishing Novak Café & Restaurant, a franchise themed around Djokovic's tennis success. Over time, the company, whose day-to-day operations are mostly handled by Novak's father Srdjan and uncle Goran, expanded its activities into real estate, sports/entertainment event organization, and sports apparel distribution. The company launched Novak Café & Restaurant in 2008 in the Belgrade municipality of Novi Beograd, the flagship location in a franchised chain of theme café-restaurants. During 2009, two more locations were added — one in Kragujevac and the other in Belgrade, the city's second, in September at the neighbourhood of Dorćol overlooking the playing courts of Serbia Open whose inaugural edition took place several months earlier. On 16 December 2011 a location in Novi Sad was opened, however, it operated just over three years before closing in late March 2015.
    In March 2012, Djokovic was announced by Bombardier Aerospace as its latest Learjet brand ambassador, thus joining the likes of actor and pilot John Travolta, architect Frank Gehry, maestro Valery Gergiev, and classical pianist Lang Lang.
    More Details Hide Details From January 2014 Djokovic has been endorsing French car manufacturer Peugeot. At the same time he entered into an endorsement deal with Japanese watch manufacturer Seiko, having just ended his affiliation with their rivals Audemars Piguet. In early 2015, ahead of Australian Open, Djokovic teamed up with Australian banking corporation ANZ for a social media campaign to raise money for local communities across the Asia Pacific region. At the same time his partnership with Jacob's Creek, an Australian wine brand owned by Orlando Wines, was announced in regards to the production and distribution of 'Made By' film series, a documentary style content meant to "show a side of Novak not seen before as he recounts never before told life stories from Belgrade, Serbia, celebrating what has made him the champion he is today". According to Forbes, Djokovic earned US$31 million in endorsements during 2014, behind only Roger Federer (US$58 million), Tiger Woods ($50 million), Phil Mickelson ($48), LeBron James ($44), Kevin Durant ($35), and Rory McIlroy ($32).
    At that point, he was set to join forces with Nike, Inc., but instead, on 23 May 2012, Uniqlo appointed Djokovic as its global brand ambassador.
    More Details Hide Details The five-year sponsorship, reportedly worth €8 million per year, began on 27 May 2012 in Paris' Roland-Garros French Open Tennis Tournament. A year later, Djokovic's long-term footwear deal with Adidas was announced ahead of 2013 French Open. In August 2011, Djokovic became the brand ambassador of Swiss watch manufacturer Audemars Piguet. Less than a month later, Djokovic signed a sponsorship deal with German car company Mercedes-Benz.
    In 2012, Djokovic appeared in a television commercial with Maria Sharapova promoting the use of Head rackets for many techniques such as golf and ten-pin bowling.
    More Details Hide Details In assessing Djokovic's 2011 season, Jimmy Connors said that Djokovic gives his opponents problems by playing "a little bit old-school, taking the ball earlier, catching the ball on the rise, (and) driving the ball flat." Connors adds that a lot of the topspin that Djokovic's opponents drive at him comes right into his zone, thus his ability to turn defence into offence well. In the period 2004 and 2005, Djokovic was coached by Dejan Petrovic. From fall 2005 until June 2006, he was coached by Riccardo Piatti who divided his time between the 18-year-old and Ivan Ljubičić. Player and coach reportedly parted ways over the latter's refusal to work full-time with Djokovic. Since June 2006, Djokovic has been coached by Slovakian former professional tennis player Marián Vajda. They met for the first time during that year's French Open, after which Vajda got hired to be the 19-year-old's coach. On occasion Djokovic employed additional coaches on part-time basis: in 2007, during the spring hardcourt season, he worked with Australian doubles ace Mark Woodforde with specific emphasis on volleys and net play while from August 2009 until April 2010 American Todd Martin joined the coaching team, a period marked by his ill-fated attempt to change Djokovic's serve motion.
    Djokovic commented on the modern style of play, including his own, in interview with Jim Courier after his semifinal win against Andy Murray in the 2012 Australian Open tournament:
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    Tennis pundits have classified many of Djokovic's matches as some of the greatest contests ever, with the 2012 Australian Open final being considered the greatest match ever seen, as a testament to his greatness as a tennis player.
    More Details Hide Details Some longtime analysts claim that the Djokovic-Nadal rivalry ranks as the best rivalry in tennis history primarily because of the quality of matches they produce. Djokovic is an all-court player with emphasis on aggressive baseline play. His groundstrokes from both wings are consistent, deep, and penetrating. His backhand is widely regarded as one of the best in today's game. His best shot is his backhand down the line, with great pace and precision. He is also known as one of the greatest movers on the court with superior agility, court coverage and defensive ability, which allows him to hit winners from seemingly defensive positions. After great technical difficulties during the 2009 season (coinciding with his switch to the Head racket series), his serve is one of his major weapons again, winning him many free points; his first serve is typically hit flat, while he prefers to slice and kick his second serves wide. Djokovic's return of serve is a powerful weapon for him, with which he can be both offensive and defensive. Djokovic is rarely aced because of his flexibility, length and balance. Djokovic is highly efficient off both the forehand and backhand return, often getting the return in play deep with pace, neutralizing the advantage the server usually has in a point. John McEnroe considers Djokovic to be the greatest returner of serve in the history of the men's game. Occasionally, Djokovic employs a well-disguised backhand underspin drop shot and sliced backhand.
    On 26 October 2012, he appeared on Canal+'s Le Grand Journal.
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    He was named amongst the 100 most influential people of 2012 by TIME magazine.
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    He appeared on the cover of Italian GQs March 2012 issue.
    More Details Hide Details Also, in March he was profiled on the CBS show 60 Minutes by their correspondent Bob Simon.
    Djokovic began his season by winning the 2012 Australian Open.
    More Details Hide Details He won his first four rounds against Paolo Lorenzi, Santiago Giraldo, Nicolas Mahut and Lleyton Hewitt, respectively. In the quarterfinals he defeated David Ferrer in three sets. In the semifinal, Djokovic beat Murray in five sets after 4 hours and 50 minutes, coming back from a two-sets-to-one deficit and fending off break points at 5-all in the fifth set. In the final, Djokovic beat Nadal in five sets, coming from a break down in the final set to win 7–5. At 5 hours and 53 minutes, the match was the longest final in Open Era Grand Slam history, as well as the longest match in Australian Open history, surpassing the 5-hour and 14-minute 2009 semifinal between Nadal and Fernando Verdasco. Djokovic was beaten by John Isner in the semifinals at Indian Wells. He successfully defended his title in Miami. In the Monte Carlo final, he lost in straight sets to Nadal, unable to prevent Nadal from earning his record-breaking eighth consecutive title there.
  • 2011
    He then switched to the Head YouTek IG Speed (18x20) paint job in 2011, and in 2013, he again updated his paint job to the Head Graphene Speed Pro, which included an extensive promotional campaign.
    More Details Hide Details Djokovic uses a hybrid of Head Natural Gut (gauge 16) in the mains and Luxilon Big Banger ALU Power Rough (gauge 16L) in the crosses. He also uses Head Synthetic Leather Grip as a replacement grip.
    They have also met in seven Grand Slam tournament finals: The 2011 Australian Open, the 2012 US Open, the 2013 Australian Open, the 2013 Wimbledon Championships, the 2015 Australian Open, the 2016 Australian Open and most recently, the 2016 French Open.
    More Details Hide Details Djokovic has won in Australia four times and won at the French Open, while it was Murray who emerged the victor at the US Open and Wimbledon.
    This marked Djokovic's third loss of his 2011 season, and his second retirement.
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    In the semifinals of the 2011 Davis Cup, Djokovic played a crucial rubber match for Serbia against Juan Martin del Potro of Argentina, where he retired while trailing, after reaggravating a back injury sustained during the US Open tournament.
    More Details Hide Details This secured Argentina's place in the final.
    Djokovic was named 2011 ITF World Champion.
    More Details Hide Details He also received the Golden Bagel Award by winning 13 sets with the result of 6–0 during the season.
    Pete Sampras declared Djokovic's 2011 season as the best he has ever seen in his lifetime, calling it "one of the best achievements in all of sports."
    More Details Hide Details Boris Becker called Djokovic's season "one of the very best years in tennis of all time", adding that it "may not be the best statistically, but he's beaten Federer, he's beaten Nadal, he's beaten everybody that came around to challenge him in the biggest tournaments in the world." Rafael Nadal, who lost to Djokovic in six finals on three different surfaces, described Djokovic's performances as "probably the highest level of tennis that I ever saw."
    Djokovic won ten tournaments in 2011, including Grand Slam tournament victories at the Australian Open, Wimbledon and the US Open.
    More Details Hide Details Djokovic also captured a record-breaking five ATP World Tour Masters 1000 titles, and set a new record for the most prize money won in a single season on the ATP World Tour ($12 million). His level dropped at season's end beginning with a back injury and ended with a poor showing at the ATP World Tour Finals. Djokovic finished the season with a 70–6 record and a year-end ranking of world No. 1.
  • 2010
    Djokovic started his year by playing in the AAMI Classic, an exhibition event. In his first match, he defeated Haas before losing to Fernando Verdasco in his second. At the 2010 Australian Open, Djokovic lost a five-setter to Tsonga in the quarterfinals.
    More Details Hide Details Despite the loss, he attained a career-high ranking of world No. 2 and went on to reach the semifinals of the ABN AMRO World Tennis Tournament in Rotterdam, where he lost to Youzhny. At the Dubai Tennis Championships, Djokovic reached the final, this time defeating Youzhny to win his first title of the year. Djokovic then took part in Serbia's Davis Cup tie against the United States on clay in Belgrade and helped his country reach its first quarterfinal in the Davis Cup with a 3–2 victory, defeating Querrey and Isner. At the Indian Wells Masters, Djokovic lost in the fourth round to Ljubičić. At the Miami Masters, he lost in his opening match to Olivier Rochus. Djokovic then announced that he had ceased working with Todd Martin as his coach. In his first clay-court tournament of the year at the Monte-Carlo Rolex Masters, top-seeded Djokovic reached the semifinals with wins over Wawrinka and David Nalbandian before losing to Verdasco. Djokovic again lost to Verdasco at the Internazionali BNL d'Italia in Rome, this time in the quarterfinals. As the defending champion at his hometown event, the Serbia Open in Belgrade, he withdrew in the quarterfinals while trailing Filip Krajinović.
    On 6–8 March 2010, he played a key role in bringing Serbia to the World Group quarterfinals for the first time in its independent history, winning both singles matches in the home tie against the United States against Sam Querrey and John Isner.
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  • THIRTIES
  • 2009
    In 2009, and 2010, Djokovic won an Oscar of Popularity for the most popular male athlete in Serbia.
    More Details Hide Details Djokovic is also featured in the music video for the song "Hello" by Martin Solveig and Dragonette. The video, filmed at Stade Roland Garros, shows Solveig facing off against Bob Sinclar, another DJ, in a tennis match. When the referee calls a crucial ball "Out", Djokovic enters the arena and convinces the referee otherwise. In 2010, the Serbian blues-rock band Zona B recorded the song "The Joker", dedicating it to Djokovic. Djokovic's international television appearances particularly intensified during his successful 2011 season. After winning Wimbledon and reaching the number one spot on the ATP list, he again appeared on Leno's Tonight Show as well as on Conan O'Brien's show on TBS. Djokovic's dramatic win at the US Open was followed by another television blitz including spots on Live with Regis and Kelly, CBS' The Early Show, NBC's Today as well as a walk-on appearance on Late Night with Jimmy Fallon. On 25 June 2011, its seventieth Congress in Chicago, all the members unanimously awarded Djokovic the Order of Serbian National Defense in America I class, the highest decoration of the SND. The order was given to him because of his merits in the international sport scene and his contributions to the reputation of Serbs and Serbia around the world. In mid-November 2011, he made a triumphant return to Rai 1's Il più grande spettacolo dopo il weekend, hosted by Fiorello.
    Djokovic also played a large role in promoting Serbia to the 2009 World Group.
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  • 2008
    After the 2008 season, Djokovic re-signed with Head, and debuted a new paint job of the Head YouTek Speed Pro at the 2009 Australian Open.
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    His next tournament was the 2008 Summer Olympics, his first Olympics.
    More Details Hide Details He and Nenad Zimonjić, seeded second in men's doubles, were eliminated in the first round by the Czech pairing of Martin Damm and Pavel Vízner. Seeded third in singles, Djokovic lost in the semifinals to Nadal. Djokovic then defeated James Blake, the loser of the other semifinal, in the bronze medal match. After the Olympics, Djokovic entered the US Open seeded third, where he defeated Roddick in the quarterfinals. To a smattering of boos in a post-match interview, Djokovic criticized Roddick for accusing him of making excessive use of the trainer during matches. His run at the US Open ended in the semifinals when he lost to Federer in four sets, in a rematch of the previous year's final. Djokovic went on to play four tournaments after the US Open. At the Thailand Open, he lost to Tsonga in straight sets. In November, Djokovic was the second seed at the year-ending Tennis Masters Cup in Shanghai. In his first round-robin match, he defeated Argentine Juan Martín del Potro in straight sets. He then beat Nikolay Davydenko in three sets, before losing his final round-robin match against Tsonga. Djokovic qualified for the semifinals, where he defeated Gilles Simon. In the final, Djokovic defeated Davydenko to win his first Tennis Masters Cup title.
  • 2007
    Djokovic then failed to defend his 2007 singles title at the Rogers Cup in Toronto — he was eliminated in the quarterfinals by eighth-seeded Andy Murray.
    More Details Hide Details The following week at the Cincinnati Masters, Djokovic advanced to the final, beating Nadal. In the final, he again lost to Murray in straight sets.
    Djokovic played a key role in the 2007 play-off win over Australia by winning all his matches and helping promote the Serbia Davis Cup team to the 2008 World Group.
    More Details Hide Details In Serbia's tie against Russia in Moscow in early 2008, Djokovic was sidelined due to influenza and was forced to miss his first singles match. He returned to win his doubles match, teaming with Nenad Zimonjić, before being forced to retire during his singles match with Nikolay Davydenko. Djokovic started the year by playing the Hopman Cup with fellow Serbian world No. 3 Jelena Janković. While he won all his round-robin matches, the team lost 1–2 in the final to the second-seeded American team of Serena Williams and Mardy Fish. At the Australian Open, Djokovic reached his second consecutive Grand Slam final without dropping a set, including a victory over three-time defending champion Federer in the semifinals. By reaching the semifinals, Djokovic became the youngest player to have reached the semifinals in all four Grand Slam events. In the final, Djokovic defeated unseeded Frenchman Jo-Wilfried Tsonga in four sets to earn his first Grand Slam singles title. This marked the first time since the 2005 Australian Open that a Grand Slam singles title was not won by Federer or Nadal.
    Djokovic began 2007 by defeating Australian Chris Guccione in the final of the tournament in Adelaide, before losing in the fourth round of the Australian Open to eventual champion Roger Federer in straight sets.
    More Details Hide Details His performances at the Masters Series events in Indian Wells, and Key Biscayne, where he was the runner-up and champion respectively, pushed him into the world's top 10. Djokovic lost the Indian Wells final to Rafael Nadal, but defeated Nadal in Key Biscayne in the quarterfinals before defeating Guillermo Cañas for the title in the finals. After winning his first Master Series title, Djokovic returned to Serbia to help his country enter the Davis Cup World Group in a match against Georgia. Djokovic won a point by defeating Georgia's George Chanturia. Later, he played in the Monte Carlo Masters, where he was defeated by David Ferrer in the third round, and at the Estoril Open, where he defeated Richard Gasquet in the final. Djokovic then reached the quarterfinals of both the Internazionali d'Italia in Rome, where he lost to Nadal, and the Hamburg Masters, where he was defeated by Carlos Moyà. At the French Open, Djokovic reached his first major semifinal, losing to eventual champion Nadal.
  • 2006
    On 9 April 2006, Djokovic clinched a decisive Davis Cup win against Great Britain by defeating Greg Rusedski in four sets in the fourth match of the tie, giving Serbia and Montenegro an insurmountable 3–1 lead in their best-of-five series, thus keeping the country in the Group One Euro/African Zone of Davis Cup.
    More Details Hide Details Afterwards, Djokovic briefly considered moving from Serbia to play for Great Britain. Following this match-up, the British media spoke of Djokovic's camp negotiating with the Lawn Tennis Association about changing his international loyalty by joining British tennis ranks. The nineteen-year-old Djokovic, who was ranked sixty-third in the world at the time, mostly dismissed the story at first by saying that the talks were not serious, describing them as "the British being very kind to us after the Davis Cup." However, more than three years later, in October 2009, Djokovic confirmed that the talks between his family and the LTA throughout April and May 2006 were indeed serious:
  • 2005
    Djokovic made his first Grand Slam tournament appearance by qualifying for the 2005 Australian Open, where he was defeated by eventual champion Marat Safin in the first round in straight sets, after defeating future rival Stanislas Wawrinka in qualifying.
    More Details Hide Details However, he went on to reach the third round of both Wimbledon and the US Open, coming back from two sets down to defeat Guillermo García-López in the former, and beating Gaël Monfils and Mario Ančić in the latter. Djokovic participated in four Masters events and qualified for two of them, his best performance coming in Paris, where he reached the third round and defeated fourth seed Mariano Puerta along the way. Djokovic became one of the 40 best players in the world singles rankings after making his first quarterfinal appearance at a Grand Slam event, coming at the French Open, and also by reaching the fourth round at Wimbledon that year. Three weeks after Wimbledon, Djokovic won his first ATP title at the Dutch Open in Amersfoort without losing a set, defeating Nicolás Massú in the final. He won his second career title at the Moselle Open in Metz, and moved into the top 20 for the first time in his career. Djokovic also reached his first career Masters quarterfinal at Madrid during the indoor hardcourt season.
    He met his future wife, Jelena Ristić, in high school, and began dating her in 2005. The two became engaged in September 2013, and on 10 July 2014 the couple got married on Sveti Stefan in Montenegro, while a church wedding was held in the same place, on 12 July 2014, in the Church of Saint Stephen which belongs to Praskvica Monastery.
    More Details Hide Details On 24 April 2014, Djokovic announced that he and Ristić were expecting their first child. His son Stefan was born in October 2014.
  • 2004
    His first tour-level tournament was Umag in 2004, where he lost to Filippo Volandri in the round of 32.
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  • 2003
    At the beginning of his professional career, he mainly played in Futures and Challenger tournaments, winning three of each type from 2003 to 2005.
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    Djokovic turned professional in 2003.
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  • 2001
    As a member of the Yugoslav national team, Djokovic reached the final of the 2001 Junior Davis Cup for players under 14, in which he lost his match in singles.
    More Details Hide Details In juniors, Djokovic compiled a singles win/loss record of 40–11 (and 23–6 in doubles), reaching a combined junior world ranking of No. 24 in February 2004. At the junior Grand Slam tournaments his best showing was at the Australian Open where he reached the semifinals in 2004. He did not play at Wimbledon but he did play at the Jr French Open and Jr US Open.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1993
    Djokovic began playing tennis at the age of four. In the summer of 1993, the six-year-old was spotted by Yugoslav tennis player Jelena Genčić at Mount Kopaonik, where Djokovic's parents ran a fast-food parlour.
    More Details Hide Details Upon seeing Djokovic play tennis, she stated: "This is the greatest talent I have seen since Monica Seles." Genčić worked with young Djokovic over the following six years before realizing that, due to his rapid development, going abroad in search of increased level of competition was the best option for his future. To that end, she contacted Nikola Pilić and in September 1999 the 12-year-old moved to the Pilić tennis academy in Oberschleißheim, Germany, spending four years there. At the age of 14, he began his international career, winning European championships in singles, doubles, and team competition. Djokovic is known for his often humorous off-court impersonations of his fellow players, many of whom are his friends. This became evident to the tennis world after his 2007 US Open quarterfinal win over Carlos Moyá, where he entertained the audience with impersonations of Rafael Nadal and Maria Sharapova. His impersonations have also become very popular on YouTube. Djokovic did an impression of John McEnroe after his fourth round match victory at the 2009 US Open, before playing a brief game with McEnroe, much to the delight of the audience. Novak Djokovic is a member of the "Champions for Peace" club, a group of famous elite athletes committed to serving peace in the world through sport, created by Peace and Sport, a Monaco-based international organization.
  • TEENAGE
  • 1987
    Djokovic was born on 22 May 1987 in Belgrade, SR Serbia, Yugoslavia, to parents Srđan and Dijana (née Žagar).
    More Details Hide Details Novak's father is Montenegrin in origin and his mother is Croatian by background, with Novak considering himself to be Serbian. His two younger brothers, Marko and Djordje, are also tennis players with professional aspirations. A resident in Monte Carlo, Djokovic was coached by former Slovak tennis player Marián Vajda from 2006 until Boris Becker took over the role of Head Coach in December 2013. Djokovic is a self-described fan of languages, speaking Serbian, English, French, German and Italian.
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