Olga Samaroff
American pianist
Olga Samaroff
Olga Samaroff was a pianist, music critic, and teacher. Her second husband was conductor Leopold Stokowski.
Biography
Olga Samaroff's personal information overview.
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News
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Tam Valley Speaker Series continues Aug. 31 - Marinscope Community Newspapers
Google News - over 5 years
31, at 7 pm, with historian and author Donna Kline, who will give a talk titled “Virtuoso: The Olga Samaroff Story.” Kline will discuss the documentary film about Samaroff, who became one of America's first and perhaps most famous international concert
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Google News article
Virtuoso: The Olga Samaroff Story - Marinscope Community Newspapers
Google News - almost 6 years
The film Virtuoso tells the true, yet little known story of one of America's great women concert pianists, Olga Samaroff, who opened the concert stage to women. Overshadowed by her famous husband, Leopold Stokowski whose talent she first recognized and
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Google News article
MUSIC; Found Gems From a Pianist Gone Too Soon
NYTimes - over 8 years
IN August 1953 the astonishing young American pianist William Kapell traveled to Australia for an extended tour. Over 14 weeks he played 37 concerts, both solo recitals and concertos. On his return trip to New York, where his wife of five years and their young son and daughter were awaiting him, the DC-6 Kapell was flying in clipped a forested
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NYTimes article
Coming to America
NYTimes - about 9 years
ARTISTS IN EXILE How Refugees From Twentieth-Century War and Revolution Transformed the American Performing Arts. By Joseph Horowitz. Illustrated. 458 pp. Harper/HarperCollins Publishers. $27.50. It is hard to imagine where American culture would be today without the contributions of Hitler and Stalin -- that is, without the thousands of creatively
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NYTimes article
Paid Notice: Deaths TURECK, , ROSALYN
NYTimes - over 13 years
TURECK -- Rosalyn. The House of Steinway & Sons notes with profound sadness the passing of its beloved friend Rosalyn Tureck on July 17 in Riverdale, New York at the age of 88. A native of Chicago, Mme. Tureck studied with Jan Chiapusso, Sophia Brilliant-Liven and later with Olga Samaroff at The Juilliard School. Her legendary Town Hall recitals of
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NYTimes article
Paid Notice: Deaths TURECK, , ROSALYN
NYTimes - over 13 years
TURECK -- Rosalyn. The Tureck Bach Research Institute, Inc., mourns the passing on July 17th of its Founder and Artistic Director, renowned keyboard artist, teacher, and Bach scholar Rosalyn Tureck. Reconstituted from her earlier Tureck Bach Institute after her return to this country in September 2001, Dr. Tureck established the Tureck Bach
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NYTimes article
Paid Notice: Deaths TURECK, , ROSALYN
NYTimes - over 13 years
TURECK -- Rosalyn. The House of Steinway & Sons notes with profound sadness the passing of its beloved friend Rosalyn Tureck on July 17 in Riverdale, New York at the age of 88. A native of Chicago, Mme. Tureck studied with Jan Chiapusso, Sophia Brilliant-Liven and later with Olga Samaroff at The Juilliard School. Her legendary Town Hall recitals of
Article Link:
NYTimes article
Rosalyn Tureck, Pianist Specializing in Bach, Dies at 88
NYTimes - over 13 years
Rosalyn Tureck, a pianist and harpsichordist who played an important part in the revival of interest in the music of Johann Sebastian Bach, and who devoted more than six decades to performing, researching, teaching and writing about his works, died on Thursday at her home in Riverdale, the Bronx. She was 88. Ms. Tureck, born in Chicago, spent many
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NYTimes article
Paid Notice: Deaths GANZ, PAULINE STERNLICHT
NYTimes - almost 16 years
GANZ-Pauline Sternlicht. Born 1906 in New York City to Adolph Sternlicht and Anna Scher Sternlicht. Pauline attended the Juilliard Institute of Musical Art, now known as The Juilliard School, where she was a student of Olga Samaroff. After graduation she became a concert pianist and, as Pauline Gilbert, performed as part of a piano-duo with
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NYTimes article
Claudette Sorel, 66, Concert Pianist and Teacher
NYTimes - over 17 years
Claudette Sorel, a pianist who was at her best in music that demanded delicacy and lyricism but who also gave highly regarded performances of difficult contemporary works and big Romantic showpieces, died on Friday at her home in Hampton Bays, N.Y. She was 66. The cause was cancer, said a spokesman for the J. Ronald Scott Funeral Home in Hampton
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NYTimes article
THE JUILLIARD SCHOOL; Both Head and Heart
NYTimes - over 17 years
To the Editor: As a musician and educator, I hope the cellist Joel Krosnick was indulging in ironic understatement when James R. Oestreich, in his article on the Juilliard School, quoted him as saying that brains and the use of them are ''not necessarily an enemy to musical talent'' [''Juilliard Tries to Nurture Well-Tempered Artists,'' May 23].
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NYTimes article
When New Is Old and Modern Is History
NYTimes - over 20 years
The turn of the century is sure to obliterate pigeonholes, overturn cherished notions and require new modes of thought. (The turn of the millennium is simply too much to contemplate.) Certainly, the adjective ''20th-century'' will lose much of the fearsome edge it has held for many music lovers. And what meaning can ''modern'' and ''contemporary''
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NYTimes article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Olga Samaroff
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 1948
    Age 67
    Teacher to the end, she died of a heart attack at her home in New York on the evening of May 17, 1948, after giving several lessons that day.
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  • FORTIES
  • 1928
    Age 47
    She also wrote for the New York Evening Post until 1928, and gave guest lectures throughout the 1930s.
    More Details Hide Details It should be noted that Samaroff was the second pianist in history to perform all of the Beethoven piano sonatas (32) in public after Hans von Bulow, preceding Schnabel by several years (who did the series first in 1927). Samaroff developed a course of music study for laymen and was the first music teacher to be broadcast on NBC television. She taught at the Philadelphia Conservatory and in 1924 was invited to join the faculty of the newly formed Juilliard School in New York. She taught at both schools for the rest of her life. Called "Madam" by her students, she was a tireless advocate for them, supplying many of her Depression-era charges with everything from concert clothes to food, and pressing officials at Juilliard to build a dormitory - a project that was not realized until after her death decades later. Her most famous pupil was concert pianist William Kapell who was killed in a 1953 plane crash at age 31. She herself said that the best pianist she ever taught was the New Zealander Richard Farrell, who also died at age 31, in a motor vehicle accident in England in 1958.
  • 1925
    Age 44
    In 1925 Samaroff fell in her New York apartment, suffering an injury to her shoulder which forced her to retire from performing.
    More Details Hide Details She worked primarily as a critic and teacher from then on.
  • 1923
    Age 42
    In 1923, Samaroff and Stokowski divorced; the reasons included Stokowski's infidelity, from which she never recovered.
    More Details Hide Details She took refuge in her friends, among whom were George Gershwin, Irving Berlin, Dorothy Parker, and Cary Grant.
  • THIRTIES
  • 1911
    Age 30
    She married Stokowski in 1911 and their daughter Sonya was born in 1921.
    More Details Hide Details Samaroff made a number of recordings in the early 1920s for the Victor Talking Machine Company.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1909
    Age 28
    She played Tchaikovsky's 1st Piano Concerto under Stokowski's direction when he made his official conducting debut in Paris with the Colonne Orchestra on May 12, 1909.
    More Details Hide Details At that time much more famous than he, Samaroff lobbied her distinguished contacts to get him appointed (in 1912) to the vacant conductor's post at the famed Philadelphia Orchestra, launching his international career.
  • 1905
    Age 24
    As Olga Samaroff, she self-produced her New York debut at Carnegie Hall in 1905 (the first woman ever to do so), hiring the hall, the orchestra and the conductor Walter Damrosch, and making an overwhelming impression with her performance of Tchaikovsky's Piano Concerto No. 1.
    More Details Hide Details She played extensively in the United States and Europe thereafter. Samaroff discovered Leopold Stokowski (1882–1977) when he was church organist at St. Bartholemew's in New York and later conductor of the Cincinnati Orchestra.
  • TEENAGE
  • 1900
    Age 19
    Samaroff was born Lucy Mary Agnes Hickenlooper in San Antonio, Texas, and grew up in Galveston, where her family owned a business later wiped out in the Great 1900 Galveston hurricane.
    More Details Hide Details There being then no great teachers in the United States, after her talent for the piano was discovered she was sent to Europe to study, first with Antoine François Marmontel at the Conservatoire de Paris, and later with Ernst Jedliczka in Berlin, where she married, very briefly, Russian engineer Boris Loutzky. After her divorce from Loutzky, and the disaster which claimed her family's business, she returned to the United States and tried to carve out a career as a pianist but soon discovered she was hampered both by her rather awkward name and her American origins. Her agent suggested a professional name change which was taken from a remote relative.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1880
    Born
    Born on August 8, 1880.
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Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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