Oona O'Neill
Oona O'Neill
Oona, Lady Chaplin (May 14, 1925 – September 27, 1991) was the daughter of Nobel and Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Eugene O'Neill and writer Agnes Boulton, and the wife of British actor, director and producer Sir Charlie Chaplin. Oona was born while her parents were living in Bermuda, during a period of heavy drinking by Eugene O'Neill. She was two years old when he left the family for actress Carlotta Monterey who became his third wife.
Biography
Oona O'Neill's personal information overview.
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News
News abour Oona O'Neill from around the web
Geraldine Chaplin: To be a public person is part of an actor's career - Russia Beyond The Headlines
Google News - over 5 years
Or your mother Oona O'Neill? Geraldine Chaplin: I did not know my grandfather. When I grew up, I read and admired his plays. I remember watching a theatre production of his play with some friends. I was greatly impressed by it and became very emotional
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Google News article
At this ancestry roadshow, there may be gold in those old genes - Irish Times
Google News - over 5 years
So when a woman from Kilkenny wondered if she was related to Oona O'Neill, who married Charlie Chaplin (she was), the long and interesting answer was accompanied by one they had prepared earlier: a well-made short film about Chaplin, O'Neill,
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Google News article
Geraldine Chaplin: la hija notable de un padre excepcional - Rusia Hoy
Google News - over 5 years
O por Oona O'Neill, su madre? No conocí a mi abuelo. De mayor leí y admiré sus obras de teatro. Recuerdo haber ido a ver una representación teatral de una obra suya con algunos amigos. Me impresionó mucho y les expliqué emocionada que mi abuelo había
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Google News article
Géraldine Chaplin : - La Russie d'Aujourd'hui
Google News - over 5 years
Ou avec votre grand-père, lauréat du Prix Nobel de Littérature et détenteur de nombreux prix Pulitzer, Eugène O'Neill, ou avec votre mère Oona O'Neill Je n'ai pas connu mon grand-père. Plus grande, j'ai lu et admiré les pièces de grand-père
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Google News article
Geraldine Chaplin tiene intensa actividad en Perú - Informador.com.mx
Google News - over 5 years
El Centro Cultural de la Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú (PCUP) informó que la hija de Charles Chaplin y Oona O'Neill se ha declarado 'muy contenta' de estar en Perú, país al que sólo conocía por su literatura y riqueza cultural
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Google News article
Festival de Lima 2011: Geraldine Chaplin, “Charles es mi padre, Charlot es mi ... - Cinencuentro
Google News - over 5 years
La hija del mítico Charles Chaplin y de Oona O'Neill, llegó fresca y muy sonriente -con algo de retraso, todo hay que decirlo- acompañada del director del Festival, Edgar Saba, a la sala roja del CCPUCP, casi al mediodía
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Google News article
LADIES AND THE TRAMP - Express.co.uk
Google News - over 5 years
Any unease Hollywood may have felt over the age difference between Chaplin and his paramours paled into insignificance when he took up with Oona O'Neill, the beautiful daughter of Pulitzer-Prize-winning play-wright Eugene O'Neill
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Google News article
Geraldine Chaplin - Planet Interview
Google News - over 5 years
Juli 1944 im kalifornischen Santa Monica geborene Schauspielerin Geraldine Chaplin ist das fünfte Kind der britischen Filmikone Charlie Chaplin und die erste Tochter seiner vierten Ehefrau Oona O'Neill. Nachdem Chaplins Karriere als Ballett-Tänzerin
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Funny girl: The not-so silent star Oona Chaplin - The Independent
Google News - over 5 years
Her grandmother, the one Oona was named after, Oona O'Neill, was the daughter of the hard-drinking playwright Eugene O'Neill – he of The Iceman Cometh and Long Day's Journey into Night. When Oona O'Neill was just 18, she had a choice of legends vying
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Google News article
Hollywood-Star wird Solar-Aktivistin - Freie Presse
Google News - over 5 years
Ihre Mutter Oona O'Neill war die vierte Ehefrau von Chaplin. 1952 stand sie in "Limelight", eine der letzten Produktionen ihres Vaters, erstmals vor der Kamera. 1993 kam sie in der Rolle ihrer eigenen Großmutter in der Filmbiografie über ihren Vater
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Google News article
7 degrees to Truman Capote - OUPblog (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Jack Nicholson portrayed playwright Eugene O'Neill in the movie Reds à Eugene was the father of Oona O'Neill –> Oona is a possible inspiration for the character “Holly Golightly” –>“Holly” was a character played by film icon Audrey Hepburn in the movie
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Google News article
This Week in Movies: Rich Kings, Power Rings and Flightless Wings - Moviefone (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
1943 (June 16): Charlie Chaplin, 54, makes Oona O'Neill, 18, his fourth wife, leading the bride's outraged father, playwright Eugene O'Neill (who was the same age as the groom), to disinherit her. The marriage lasts until the silent actor's death 34
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Google News article
Cinema: torna l'Ischia Global Film & Music Fest tra anteprime e conferenze (3) - Libero-News.it
Google News - almost 6 years
... Germania, Brasile, Giappone, Sud Africa e Messico, il paese ospite di quest'anno sara' il Regno Unito con un omaggio al mito di Charlie Chaplin, che nel 1957 giunse sull'isola con la moglie Oona O'Neill, ospite del commendatore Angelo Rizzoli,
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Google News article
Dear Jay McInerney, - Huffington Post (blog)
Google News - almost 6 years
much as you wondered in your book review, when the biographer mentioned the heady social life Salinger led with Oona O'Neill, who later married Charlie Chaplin: "Which restaurants? Did they really socialize with movie stars, or just share the room with
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Google News article
THEATER REVIEW | NEW JERSEY; Circus Magic, With Legendary Undertones
NYTimes - over 6 years
If you look carefully at the program for ''Aurélia's Oratorio,'' you will see the name Chaplin. (It's part of the director's name.) If you see ''Aurélia's Oratorio,'' now at the McCarter Theater Center, without having read the program that carefully, you may be too busy smiling and laughing appreciatively to think about anybody's family
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NYTimes article
J. D. Salinger, Author Who Fled Fame, Dies at 91
NYTimes - about 7 years
J. D. Salinger, who was thought at one time to be the most important American writer to emerge since World War II but who then turned his back on success and adulation, becoming the Garbo of letters, famous for not wanting to be famous, died on Wednesday at his home in Cornish, N.H., where he had lived in seclusion for more than 50 years. He was
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NYTimes article
BIG DEAL; A Dance Patron Branches Out
NYTimes - about 10 years
MARY THERESA KHAWLY is a patron of American dance, with homes in Palm Beach, Fla., and New York. Deed documents filed on Dec. 15 show that Ms. Khawly spent $3.75 million for an apartment on the 30th floor of the Museum Tower, a 58-story building erected in the 1980s next to the Museum of Modern Art. The purchase is possibly part of a plan for a
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NYTimes article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Oona O'Neill
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 1991
    Age 65
    She died on September 27, 1991 at the age of 66 of pancreatic cancer in Corsier-sur-Vevey, and was buried next to her husband in the village cemetery.
    More Details Hide Details In her last will, O'Neill, who was a prolific writer of diaries and letters during her life, ordered that all her writings be destroyed, and never published. O'Neill is portrayed by Moira Kelly in Richard Attenborough's biographical film of Charlie Chaplin, Chaplin (1992). On stage, she has been portrayed by Ashley Brown in Limelight: The Story of Charlie Chaplin at the La Jolla Playhouse in San Diego in 2010, and by Erin Mackey in the production's Broadway version, Chaplin – The Musical, in 2012. She is also one of the main characters in French author Frédéric Beigbeder's novel Oona & Salinger (2014), which is loosely based on her short romance with author J.D. Salinger in the 1940s. Notes References
  • FIFTIES
  • 1981
    Age 55
    Following Chaplin's death, O'Neill divided her time between Switzerland and New York. In 1981, she appeared in a minor supporting role in Broken English, but otherwise avoided publicity.
    More Details Hide Details According to unofficial biographer Jane Scovell and ex-daughter-in-law Patrice Chaplin, O'Neill was an alcoholic, and became almost a recluse after returning permanently to Manoir de Ban in the late 1980s.
  • 1978
    Age 52
    In March 1978, O'Neill became the victim of an extortion plot.
    More Details Hide Details Chaplin's coffin was stolen from his grave by two unemployed mechanics, Roman Wardas and Gantcho Ganev, who unsuccessfully demanded a ransom from O'Neill in exchange for the body. The pair were caught in a large police operation two months later, and Chaplin's unopened coffin was reinterred, having been found buried in a field in the nearby village of Noville.
  • 1977
    Age 51
    She and Chaplin had eight children together and remained married until his death in 1977. The first decade of their marriage was spent living in Beverly Hills, but after Chaplin's re-entry permit to the United States was canceled during a voyage to London in 1952, they moved to Manoir de Ban in the Swiss village of Corsier-sur-Vevey.
    More Details Hide Details In 1954, O'Neill renounced her American citizenship and became a British citizen.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1952
    Age 26
    The family soon decided to move permanently to Europe, and in November 1952, O'Neill flew back to the US to transfer Chaplin's assets to European bank accounts and to close up their house and the studio.
    More Details Hide Details In early January 1953, they moved to their new home, Manoir de Ban, a estate in the rural village of Corsier-sur-Vevey in Switzerland. The following year, O'Neill renounced her American citizenship, and became a British citizen. While living in Switzerland, the Chaplins added four more children to their family: Eugene Anthony (b. August 1953), Jane Cecil (b. May 1957), Annette Emily (b. December 1959) and Christopher James (b. July 1962). When Chaplin's health gradually started to fail in the late 1960s, he became increasingly dependent on Oona's support. He died at age 88 on 25 December 1977, and was buried two days later.
    In September 1952, while travelling with O'Neill and their children to London for the premiere of Limelight on board the Queen Elizabeth cruise ship, his re-entry permit was revoked.
    More Details Hide Details
    Following the marriage, O'Neill gave up her career plans and settled into the role of housewife. She rarely spoke in public, but in 1952 commented that she was "happy to stay in the background", and help Chaplin where needed.
    More Details Hide Details They spent the first nine years of their marriage living in Beverly Hills and had the first four of their eight children, Geraldine Leigh (b. July 1944), Michael John (b. March 1946), Josephine Hannah (b. March 1949) and Victoria (b. May 1951), during this time. Although she focused on her home and children, O'Neill also spent time at the studios if Chaplin was working. He often consulted O'Neill for her opinion. She also acted as a stand-in for lead actress Claire Bloom in Limelight (1952), when a scene had to be reshot after filming had wrapped, and Bloom was already working on another project. The 1940s and 1950s were a difficult time for Chaplin in the United States, where he was accused of Communist sympathies and was investigated by the FBI.
  • TEENAGE
  • 1943
    Age 17
    On 16 June 1943, a month after O'Neill had turned 18, they eloped and married in a civil service in Carpinteria.
    More Details Hide Details The ceremony was witnessed only by Chaplin's studio secretary, Catherine Hunter, and friend and assistant, Harry Crocker. Crocker photographed the event for gossip columnist Louella Parsons, to whom Chaplin had given exclusive rights to publicize news of the marriage in the hopes that she would write a more positive article about it than her rival, Hedda Hopper, who strongly disliked him. The elopement received a large amount of media attention due to the 36-year age gap between O'Neill and Chaplin, and because his ex-girlfriend, Joan Barry, had filed a paternity suit against him only two weeks earlier. Although Agnes had given the union her blessing, it cemented O'Neill's estrangement from her father, who disowned her and her issue and refused all future attempts of reconciliation.
    In Hollywood, O'Neill was introduced to Chaplin, who considered her for a film role. The film was never made, but O'Neill and Chaplin began a romantic relationship and married in June 1943, a month after she had turned 18.
    More Details Hide Details The 36-year age gap between them caused a scandal, and severed O'Neill's relationship with her father, who had already strongly disapproved of her wish to become an actress. Following the marriage, O'Neill gave up her career plans.
  • 1942
    Age 16
    Shadow and Substance was shelved in December 1942, but the relationship between O'Neill and Chaplin soon developed from professional to romantic.
    More Details Hide Details
    In October 1942, Wallace introduced her to Charlie Chaplin, who was looking for a lead actress for his next project, an adaptation of the play Shadow and Substance.
    More Details Hide Details Chaplin found O'Neill beautiful but, at 17, too young for the role. However, due to her and Wallace's persistence, he agreed to give O'Neill a film contract.
    After graduating from Brearley, O'Neill declined an offer for a place to study at Vassar College and instead chose to pursue an acting career, despite her father's resistance. She made her debut in a small supporting role in a production of Pal Joey at the Maplewood Theatre in New Jersey in July 1942.
    More Details Hide Details The production was a flop and was cancelled after a two-week run. Later that summer, O'Neill travelled to California with Carol Marcus, who was due to marry author William Saroyan. During the trip, O'Neill briefly appeared in a production of Saroyan's play, The Time of Your Life, in San Francisco and unsuccessfully attempted to meet her father, who was living nearby. From San Francisco, O'Neill headed to Los Angeles, where her mother and stepfather were living. She soon found herself a film agent, Minna Wallace, and made her first and only screentest, for Eugene Frenke's The Girl From Leningrad.
    In April 1942, during her senior year at Brearley, she was crowned as "The Number One Debutante" of the 1942–1943 season at the Stork Club.
    More Details Hide Details The event gained a large amount of publicity around the country, and she received offers from film studios and modeling agencies. The publicity infuriated her father, who used his contacts in Hollywood to prevent her from signing a film contract.
    In 1942, she received a large amount of media attention after she was chosen as "The Number One Debutante" of the 1942–1943 season at the Stork Club.
    More Details Hide Details Soon after, she decided to pursue a career in acting and, after small roles in two stage productions, headed for Hollywood.
  • 1940
    Age 14
    Agnes did not find the school satisfactory, and had her transferred to the Brearley School in New York for her sophomore year in 1940.
    More Details Hide Details At Brearley, O'Neill became a close friend of Carol Marcus, and through her was introduced to Gloria Vanderbilt and Truman Capote. Although still underage, the group often spent time at popular nightclubs, and began to appear in the society pages of magazines. During this time, O'Neill dated newspaper cartoonist Peter Arno and the still unknown author J.D. Salinger.
  • 1938
    Age 12
    O'Neill first attended a Catholic convent school, but it was deemed unsuitable for her, and she was then enrolled at the Ocean Road Public School in Point Pleasant. According to the divorce settlement both children were to attend top boarding schools from the age of 13 and, in 1938, O'Neill was sent to study at the Warrenton Country School in Warrenton, Virginia.
    More Details Hide Details
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1929
    Age 3
    Agnes was granted a divorce in Reno, Nevada in July 1929, and three weeks later, Eugene married Monterey in France.
    More Details Hide Details After the divorce, O'Neill's childhood was mostly spent living with her mother and brother in West Point Pleasant and occasionally at Spithead, in which Agnes had a lifetime interest. Although the divorce had granted joint custody, she seldom saw her father, and mainly communicated with him through letters, which were usually answered by Monterey.
  • 1926
    Age 0
    Her parents' marriage had been for a long time strained by Eugene's alcoholism, and started to disintegrate after he had an affair with actress Carlotta Monterey while they were living in Belgrade, Maine in the summer of 1926.
    More Details Hide Details He rekindled his romance with Monterey during a trip to New York in the early autumn of 1927, and after a brief return to Bermuda, separated from Agnes in November. Agnes and the children stayed in Bermuda until the following summer, when they moved to her parents' old house in West Point Pleasant, New Jersey.
    O'Neill's early childhood was spent between Bermuda —where the family spent winters and in 1926 purchased a house, Spithead (originally the home of privateer Hezekiah Frith)— and various places on the East Coast of the United States.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1925
    Born
    Oona O'Neill was born on May 14, 1925 in Bermuda, where her parents had relocated to six months before her birth in the hopes that it would be a good place to write during the winter.
    More Details Hide Details She had an older brother, Shane Rudraighe O'Neill (1919–1977). Both of her parents also had children from previous relationships, Eugene O'Neill, Jr. and Barbara Burton, but they did not live with the family and O'Neill saw them only occasionally during her childhood.
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