Paddy Chayefsky
Recipient of the Purple Heart medal
Paddy Chayefsky
Sidney Aaron "Paddy" Chayefsky, was an American playwright, screenwriter and novelist. He is the only person to have won three solo Academy Awards for Best Screenplay (the other three-time winners, Woody Allen, Francis Ford Coppola, Charles Brackett and Billy Wilder, have all shared their awards with co-writers). He was considered one of the most renowned dramatists of the so-called Golden Age of Television.
Biography
Paddy Chayefsky's personal information overview.
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News
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Check into 'Hospital' for daily dose of malaise - Mid Columbia Tri City Herald
Google News - over 5 years
But Paddy Chayefsky's strong script isn't the only thing at work here. Prolific director Arthur Hiller builds a suffocating atmosphere of urban rot and bureaucratic nightmares, a place where people are dying because nobody else can bother to tell
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Zero Sum Game – The Black Box of the Congressional Budget Process - Business Insider
Google News - over 5 years
Paddy Chayefsky said it best in his brilliant script for the movie “Network.” Like the ones most of us remember, these words too are spoken by Peter Finch playing Howard Beale, a once-respected network news anchor: “I don't have to tell you things are
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Reality Check: S & P vs. USA - Aquarian Weekly
Google News - over 5 years
When Paddy Chayefsky's blustery corporate chairman Arthur Jensen delivers his impassioned speech at the denouement of his brilliant film, Network, written and produced in the mid-'70s, it appeared then as an absurdly dark satire with the kind of
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The Tea Party.Net Selects TV Inc As Their National Advertising Agency - NewsReleaseWire.com (press release)
Google News - over 5 years
To quote Paddy Chayefsky from his film "Network", 'Were mad as H*** and we're not going to take it anymore.'" "Secondly, The Tea Party Members are not Terrorists. They do not want to overthrow the government. They are just tired of paying for failing
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Mass Dysphoria - Cape Cod Today (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
In 1976, Paddy Chayefsky's Network, directed by Sidney Lumet, hit the big screens all over America, starring Faye Dunaway, William Holden and Robert Duvall. The most memorable scene, however, belonged to Peter Finch as Howard Beale
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'Rise of the Planet of the Apes' screenwriters: 'We pictured a trilogy' - Entertainment Weekly
Google News - over 5 years
Yes, Paddy Chayefsky has great dialogue, and you aspire to do that as well. But film is a visual medium, and what can you show and not tell? Caesar was the genesis of the story. Rick came up with the idea for this when he was looking through his idea
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Family thanks patrons, friends for condolences and prayers - Hickory Daily Record
Google News - over 5 years
Our only hope is that Americans will send a message – the same message Paddy Chayefsky's protagonist Howard Beale sent in the classic film Network: “I'm mad as hell, and I'm not going to take it anymore!” If the overwhelming disgust of the American
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Book Coming on the Making of 'Network' - mediabistro.com
Google News - over 5 years
GalleyCat reports New York Times culture reporter Dave Itzkoff has landed a book deal to write about the making of the iconic 1976 Paddy Chayefsky film, Network. The film, which won four Academy Awards,
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Cenk Uygur's Departure From MSNBC Shatters The Popular Myth That Only Ratings ... - OpEdNews
Google News - over 5 years
Paddy Chayefsky, who wrote the script for the 1976 film, "Network," said in an interview in the 1970s that what is on television "is not true." Chayefsky said: Television is a great entertainment industry. That's what it is. I think we do entertainment
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On demand picks - Boston Globe
Google News - over 5 years
Paddy Chayefsky wrote the script and Sidney Lumet directed with the kind of feverish New York energy missing in the standard Hollywood product. (R; runs through Dec. 31) OCEAN'S ELEVEN (Comcast Movies: All Movies) In every way smarter and livelier than
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DVD reviews: 'Walk the Line,' 'Rent,' more - Reno Gazette-Journal
Google News - over 5 years
One would assume that a 1976 film about network television would feel dated today, but director Sidney Lumet and screenwriter Paddy Chayefsky had such a fine concept that "Network" seems downright contemporary, particularly viewed against the
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This Week in Repertory Film: Network, Spaceballs, Jonas Mekas, Bill Cunningham ... - Washington City Paper (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Paddy Chayefsky's script was meant as the harshest satire, of course, but there were still only three networks back then. In today's panoply of channels, every station has its own Diana Christensen, the programming executive played by Faye Dunaway
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Review: 'Idol' alum Pia Toscano's single 'This Time' - Los Angeles Times
Google News - over 5 years
"Well, I'm mad as hell and can't take it no more," the tune begins, making the double-negative its sole spin on the tired Paddy Chayefsky trope. "Like a butterfly, gonna spread my wings..." It's hard to imagine that every single line could be as
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Mike Argento: The system worked in the Casey Anthony case - York Daily Record
Google News - over 5 years
Leading the charge was CNN harridan Nancy Grace, whose presence on television is yet more proof that Paddy Chayefsky's brilliant movie "Network" was more prophecy than satire. After the verdict, Grace, still crazed from the news that her nemesis would
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Wright: 'Network' anticipated partisan, buffoon-rich media - The Daily Advance
Google News - over 5 years
In the mid-seventies, an authentic genius named Sidney Aaron “Paddy” Chayefsky generated a scorching screenplay which he eventually entitled “Network.” The completed film was released in November 1976 and was a scathingly brilliant
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Glenn Beck Isn't Going Anywhere - Philadelphia Magazine (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Paddy Chayefsky's brilliant 1976 film stars Peter Finch as Howard Beale, network anchor-turned-raging prophet of the airwaves. He's as mad as hell, and he's not going to take it anymore. His message resonates; ratings soar. When he gets too gloomy and
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Peter Falk, Rumpled and Crafty Actor In Television's 'Columbo,' Dies at 83
NYTimes - over 5 years
Peter Falk, who marshaled actorly tics, prop room appurtenances and his own physical idiosyncrasies to personify Columbo, one of the most famous and beloved fictional detectives in television history, died on Thursday night at his home in Beverly Hills, Calif. He was 83. His death was announced in a statement from Larry Larson, a longtime friend
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Self-Published Author Releases First Volume of Who Speaks For Man? - Benzinga
Google News - over 5 years
From the Russian poet Anna Akhmatova to American playwright Paddy Chayefsky to the British novelist Aldous Huxley to French author Emile Zola, each page in this collection will captivate and intrigue readers with stories that lurk behind both the
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Paddy Chayefsky
    FIFTIES
  • 1981
    Age 58
    Chayefsky died in New York City of cancer, for which he had declined surgery, in 1981, aged 58, and was interred in the Sharon Gardens Division of Kensico Cemetery in Valhalla, Westchester County, New York.
    More Details Hide Details His personal papers are at the Wisconsin Historical Society and the New York Public Library for the Performing Arts, Billy Rose Theatre Division. Television (selection) Stage
  • 1980
    Age 57
    He wrote the screenplay for the 1980 film, but he is credited by his real first and middle name, Sidney Aaron, because of disputes with director Ken Russell.
    More Details Hide Details Drama critic Martin Gottfried gives a general description of Chayefsky's personal traits as they may have affected his writings: "Chayefsky was a sturdy man of 42, compact and burly in the bulky way of a schoolyard athlete, with thick dark hair and a bent nose that could pass for a streetfighter's. He was a grown-up with one foot in the boys' clubs of his city youth, a street snob who would not allow the loss of his nostalgia. He was an intellectual competitor, always spoiling for a political argument or a philosophical argument, or any exchange over any issue, changing sides for the fun of the fray. A liberal, he was annoyed by liberals; a proud Jew, he wouldn't let anyone call him a 'Jewish writer'. In short, the life of the mind was a participant sport for Paddy Chayefsky."
  • 1977
    Age 54
    Chayefsky suffered greatly from stress while working on the novel, resulting in his heart attack in 1977.
    More Details Hide Details Subsequent to that misfortune, he was sued by one of the numerous scientific advisors he hired to help him with research.
  • THIRTIES
  • 1960
    Age 37
    The Tenth Man (1959) marked Chayefsky's second Broadway theatrical success, garnering 1960 Tony Award nominations for Best Play, Best Director (Tyrone Guthrie) and Best Scenic Design.
    More Details Hide Details Guthrie received another nomination for Chayefsky's Gideon, as did actor Fredric March. Chayefsky's final Broadway theatrical production, a play based on the life of Joseph Stalin, The Passion of Josef D, received unfavorable reviews and ran for only 15 performances. Although Chayefsky was an early writer for the television medium, he eventually abandoned it, "decrying the lack of interest the networks demonstrated toward quality programming". As a result, during the course of his career, he constantly toyed with the idea of lampooning the television industry, which he succeeded in doing with Network. The film is said to have "presaged the advent of reality television by twenty years" and was a "sardonic satire" of the television industry, dealing with the "dehumanization of modern life." Inspired by the work of John C. Lilly, Chayefsky spent two years in Boston doing research to write his science fiction novel Altered States (HarperCollins, 1978) about a man's search for his primal self through psychotropic drugs and an isolation tank.
  • 1957
    Age 34
    Chayefsky's The Great American Hoax was broadcast May 15, 1957 during the second season of The 20th Century Fox Hour.
    More Details Hide Details This was actually a rewrite of his earlier Fox film, As Young as You Feel (1951) with Monty Woolley and Marilyn Monroe. The Great American Hoax was shown on the FX channel after Fox restored some The 20th Century Fox Hour episodes and telecast them under the new title Fox Hour of Stars beginning in 2002. The seventh season of Philco Television Playhouse began September 19, 1954 with E. G. Marshall and Eva Marie Saint in Chayefsky's Middle of the Night, a play which relocated to Broadway theaters 15 months later; In 1956, Middle of the Night opened on Broadway with Edward G. Robinson and Gena Rowlands, and its success led to a national tour. It was filmed by Columbia Pictures in 1959 with Kim Novak and Fredric March.
  • 1955
    Age 32
    Chayefsky had a unique clause in his Marty contract that stated that only he could write the screenplay, which he did for the 1955 movie.
    More Details Hide Details
  • TWENTIES
  • 1953
    Age 30
    In 1953, Chayefsky wrote Marty, which was premiered on The Philco Television Playhouse, with Rod Steiger and Nancy Marchand.
    More Details Hide Details Marty is about a decent, hard-working Bronx butcher, pining for the company of a woman in his life but despairing of ever finding true love in a relationship. Fate pairs him with a plain, shy schoolteacher named Clara whom he rescues from the embarrassment of being abandoned by her blind date in a local dance hall. The production, the actors and Chayefsky's naturalistic dialogue received much critical acclaim and influenced subsequent live television dramas.
  • 1952
    Age 29
    Since he had always wanted to use a synagogue as backdrop, he wrote Holiday Song, telecast in 1952 and also in 1954.
    More Details Hide Details He submitted more work to Philco, including Printer's Measure, The Bachelor Party (1953) and The Big Deal (1953). One of these teleplays, Mother (April 4, 1954), received a new production October 24, 1994 on Great Performances with Anne Bancroft in the title role. Curiously, original teleplays from the 1950s are almost never revived for new TV productions, so the 1994 production of Mother was a conspicuous rarity.
  • 1951
    Age 28
    In 1951, the movie As Young as You Feel was adapted from a Chayefsky story.
    More Details Hide Details He moved into television with scripts for Danger, The Gulf Playhouse and Manhunt. Philco Television Playhouse producer Fred Coe saw the Danger and Manhunt episodes and enlisted Chayefsky to adapt the story It Happened on the Brooklyn Subway about a photographer on a New York subway train who reunites a concentration camp survivor with his long-lost wife. Chayefsky's first script to be telecast was a 1949 adaptation of Budd Schulberg's What Makes Sammy Run? for Philco.
    During 1951–52, Chayefsky wrote adaptations for radio's Theater Guild on the Air: The Meanest Man in the World (with James Stewart), Cavalcade of America, Tommy (with Van Heflin and Ruth Gordon) and Over 21 (with Wally Cox).
    More Details Hide Details His play The Man Who Made the Mountain Shake was noticed by Elia Kazan, and his wife, Molly Kazan, helped Chayefsky with revisions. It was retitled Fifth From Garibaldi but was never produced.
  • 1949
    Age 26
    Paddy and Susan (née Sackler) Chayefsky's son Dan was born six years after their 1949 marriage.
    More Details Hide Details Despite an alleged affair with Kim Novak, Paddy Chayefsky remained married to Susan Chayefsky until his death.
    He relocated to Hollywood, where he met his future wife Susan Sackler, and the couple married in February 1949.
    More Details Hide Details Failing to find work on the West Coast, Chayefsky returned to New York. During the late 1940s, he began working full-time on short stories and radio scripts, and during that period, he was a gagwriter for radio host Robert Q. Lewis. Chayefsky later recalled, "I sold some plays to men who had an uncanny ability not to raise money."
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1923
    Age 0
    Born on January 29, 1923.
    More Details Hide Details
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