Pat Trammell
American football player
Pat Trammell
Patrick Lee Trammell was an All-American quarterback for the University of Alabama from 1958 until 1961. In his senior year, he led the Crimson Tide to a perfect season of 11-0-0 and Alabama subsequently won the NCAA National Championship for 1961. On December 10, 1968, he died from metastatic testicular cancer at age 28, shortly after earning his M.D. degree.
Biography
Pat Trammell's personal information overview.
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News
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A look back to Sept. 1-7, 1961 - Hartselle Enquirer
Google News - over 5 years
Pat Trammell seems to be a shoo-in to continue as QB. His only serious challenger, Jack Hurlbut, broke his throwing arm in a summer job. Sept. 1, 1961 – The Morgan County 1961-1962 school year began today. A week from today Labor Day will be observed
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Alabama's 1961 National Championship Season - Roll 'Bama Roll
Google News - over 5 years
The Alabama offense, led by quarterback Pat Trammell, didn't set any sportswriters chasing metaphors to describe its brilliance. The highlight of the attack was the infamous "whoopee pass" where the halfback would move through the line and Trammel
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Mal Moore tells Scottsboro audience he's optimistic about '11 Tide team - al.com
Google News - over 5 years
By Mark McCarter, The Huntsville Times Coming here, to the home of Pat Trammell, one of Alabama's finest quarterbacks and this town's greatest sports hero, reminded Moore of his own playing days at the University of Alabama. Moore, now the director of
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Alabama Football: All-Time 10 Best QB's - isportsweb.com
Google News - over 5 years
I had a hard time not putting Pat Trammell #1 on this list. I know I probably have him higher than a lot of you would, but I'ma bit biased toward Trammell. I never saw him play, but from the stories I've been told by my father and others that got the
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How Big A Deal Is First Year QB? - OleMissInsider.com (subscription)
Google News - over 5 years
No one seemed concerned when Joe Namath took over for the graduated Pat Trammell at quarterback in 1962, even though Trammell had led the Tide to the 1961 national championship with an 11-0 record. Namath came just short of the ultimate goal as Bama
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College Football: The Top 25 SEC Quarterbacks of the Past 50 Years - Bleacher Report
Google News - over 5 years
The Crimson Tide had won a total of only 13 games in the five seasons prior to Pat Trammell's first varsity contest. Trammell was present during the golden age of SEC football, a 10-season period from 1957 to 1966 where the conference produced at least
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Sentinel staff wins APA awards - Scottsboro Daily Sentinel
Google News - over 5 years
Patterson was recognized as the state's top feature writer for his story on former Scottsboro High School and University of Alabama football great Pat Trammell. The story, "Only the Good Die Young," beat out entries from the Opelika-Auburn News and
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Budget protesters holding 'funeral' in Dayton - Bizjournals.com
Google News - over 5 years
“I wanted to get involved because I'm concerned about what's happening in Dayton and all across Ohio,” said Pat Trammell, event organizer. “I take people to the Job Center and the lines are longer, the needs are greater, and hope is lessening
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Pat Trammell
    TWENTIES
  • 1968
    Age 27
    Three weeks after his death, in late December 1968, the Alabama A-Club Educational and Charitable Foundation was set in motion by teammates Tommy Brooker, James A. Sharpe, Joseph K. Sims, and Billy Neighbors.
    More Details Hide Details Coach Bryant and his teammates recognized the need for a charitable program that would lend support to the families and children of former University of Alabama football players in times of need. An initial contribution of $1,000,000 in 1973 (over $5,000,000 in today's dollars) was established by Coach Bryant with Trammell's family and children in mind. The Foundation has evolved into a world class charitable support system for the University of Alabama Department of Athletics that lives on today. After the completion of the new football stadium in Scottsboro in 1971, it was named and dedicated as Trammell Stadium. In 1975, Trammell was posthumously inducted into the Alabama Sports Hall of Fame. In 2009, the theatrical performance of Bear Country starring Rodney Clark as Coach Bryant, drew unexpected popularity. During the true to life play, Coach Bryant is approaching retirement and reflects back over his life and career. Recent interest has been drawn, that, of the hundreds of players that he had coached and known so well over 45 years, he would only mention one by name. A dramatic and emotional scene in the play about his inner regard for Trammell ensued. It has been said that losing Pat ended up being so emotionally devastating for Coach Bryant that it was as if he had lost his own son.
    In 1968, Trammell was elected as Alumni President of the University of Alabama letterman's A-Club, but would never serve due to his death.
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    - Dr. Frank Rose, President, University of Alabama, December 11, 1968.
    More Details Hide Details Afterward, with tears streaming down his face, tough, tenacious Paul "Bear" Bryant escorted Pat's mother out of the standing room only church in Scottsboro. This is reported to be the only time that Coach Bryant had ever been seen weeping in public. In Bryant's autobiography The Bear, he stated that the day Pat died was "the saddest day of my life." After Coach Bryant celebrated his 300th college football victory, in 1980, a reprint of an interview by author Clyde Bolton was published in the The Birmingham News when he was reflecting back on his success as a football coach, leader and mentor. During this interview he was put on the spot and asked indirectly if he had a 'favorite player.' Coach Bryant named off a number of players that he thought highly of during the previous 22 years at Alabama and during his 30 year coaching career. He took a pause at that point and said, "now You'll have to forgive me here for getting sentimental." He then responded in turn with a direct and deliberate answer to the question, as was quoted in the October 6 edition, ". Pat Trammell was just my favorite player, but the favorite person... of my entire life."
  • 1961
    Age 20
    Coach Bryant would go on to win the National Coach of the Year Award for 1961, which was his first of three, as well as his first of six NCAA Division I FBS (I-A) National Championships, all of which are more than any other college football coach in history.
    More Details Hide Details Coach Bryant would ultimately be considered as the 'greatest college football coach of all times.' Trammell set multiple records during his career at Alabama, mostly during his senior season. 1,314 total yards with 1,035 passing yards was, at the time, a school record. At the conclusion of his final season, he would hold the record as the winningest quarterback in the entire Crimson Tide history, compiling a 26–2–4 record for a .875 winning percentage as a starter. This record stood 33 years until it was broken by Jay Barker in 1994, with a 35–2–1 record for a .934 winning percentage. Jay Barker would be later awarded the prestigious Pat Trammell Award. Currently, Trammell still holds two records at the university. Having thrown only two interceptions in 1960 from 133 passes is currently the lowest interception percentage at just 1.5%, setting the single season record. He also holds the career record for lowest interception percentage, throwing only four in 225 passes (1.8%).
    Incoming quarterback, Joe Namath ('61-'64), was heavily influenced by Pat Trammell during their overlapping season of 1961. "Pat's leadership was exemplified by his toughness," said Namath. "He was a demanding mentor and certainly made me a better quarterback.
    More Details Hide Details I miss that smile of his." In one poll, the 1961 Alabama team was voted as "the Best All-Time SEC football team" to ever play for the SEC, and, in another, the third best college football team of all time. To have turned around a decade of losing streaks from scratch and collectively outscore their opponents 297 to 25, Coach Bryant and this team have been thought to have pioneered the revolutionary turning point for the modern day University of Alabama football championship dynasty.
    By becoming the permanent 1961 team Captain, Pat Trammell had his hand prints and cleat-prints stamped into the Walk of Fame in 1961 as "most outstanding player" on the ingress of Denny Chimes on the Quad at the University.
    More Details Hide Details This was the last time that this designation was ever made. Vince Lombardi would pressure Coach Bryant to persuade Pat to come to play for him with the Green Bay Packers after graduation. Coach Bryant responded, "Pat is too smart to play professional football... he will go on to medical school to fulfill his personal goals." Trammell majored in physical chemistry in the department of chemical engineering and graduated summa cum laude in the top of his class. Teammate Billy Neighbors ('59-61) would later say that Pat Trammell was the "smartest and best football player I'd ever played with. period. And I played with some great players, like Bob Griese and Babe Parilli. Pat Trammell was still the smartest football player.. it was just the way he ran the team, the offense."
    He was chosen to receive the Most Valuable Player Award for 1961 by the Nashville Banner.
    More Details Hide Details He was 5th runner up in the vote for the Heisman Trophy. Although the Birmingham Touchdown Club SEC player of the year award did not begin until 1979, he has been publicly honored and recognized by this organization on multiple occasions.
    He was chosen as the 1961 Most Valuable Back by the Birmingham Monday Morning Quarterback Club.
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    He was voted as the 1961 Collegiate Player of the year by the Touchdown Club of Atlanta.
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    Pat Trammell was selected NCAA Academic All-American, was named the 1961 SEC Most Valuable Player, All-SEC (First Team) Back of 1961 season (AP, UPI) and All-SEC Academic Selection.
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    The following year, Trammell would lead the team to a perfect season and ultimately to a NCAA National Championship for 1961 (AP, UPI, NFF - unanimous), which was the first in 16 years for Alabama. On December 5, 1961, at the National Football Foundation's reception in the Grand Ballroom at the Waldorf-Astoria in New York, with President John F. Kennedy, Coach Bryant and Pat Trammell together proudly accepted the MacArthur Trophy on national television in recognition of Alabama's perfect season and championship.
    More Details Hide Details The black tie event was hosted by Bob Hope and was attended by General Douglas MacArthur, Vince Lombardi, head coach of the Green Bay Packers (under whom, ironically, at the time was NFL quarterback great and Alabama alumnus Bart Starr who subsequently led the Packers to five NFL titles), Sidney L. James, the founding editor and publisher of Sports Illustrated and dozens of other College Football Hall of Fame Inductees. (Of interest, a similar semi-fictional scene was digitally remastered in Winston Groom's film, Forrest Gump, in 1994, with President John F. Kennedy digitally morphed into the set with Tom Hanks, who played Forrest Gump, a celebrated (fictional) Alabama football player, who had accepted a handshake from the President and was asked "how does it feel to be an All-American?". Winston Groom had been a freshman at the University of Alabama in 1961 during this time period.)
    In his senior season in 1961, he led the Crimson Tide to a perfect season of 11–0–0 and the NCAA national championship for 1961, and finished fifth in the voting for the Heisman Trophy.
    More Details Hide Details A third-generation physician, he lost a six-month battle with metastatic testicular cancer at age 28, shortly after earning his medical degree. Pat Trammell was born in Scottsboro, Alabama, as the middle son of a prominent local physician, Dr. Edward Lee Trammell. He quickly excelled both in athletics and academics. He wished to become a physician like his father and father's grandfather. He was the starting quarterback in varsity football at Scottsboro High School, where he earned All-County, All-State, All-Southern and All-American honors during his four year prep career. He was also named most valuable basketball player in state of Alabama as a high school senior. His football career at Alabama began just prior to Paul "Bear" Bryant's announcement that he planned to return to his alma mater to take over as head coach of the ailing football program. Trammell's family recalls a personal visit at the time and a 'pep talk' from Coach Bryant saying that, "if you'll commit to Alabama, then I'll come back to Alabama." Trammell had actually planned to attend Georgia Tech, after being heavily recruited by head coach Bobby Dodd but at this point, made a career altering decision that would change the rest of his life.
  • TEENAGE
  • 1960
    Age 19
    After being named SEC champions in 1960, his bold prediction soon would become mysteriously true.
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  • 1959
    Age 18
    Bryant's influence would once again bring the program into the national spotlight and Trammell was his first star player. As a sophomore, in 1959, Trammell led Alabama in total offense and then led in total scoring in the 1960 season, including a win against the Fran Tarkenton-led Georgia Bulldogs. Coach Bryant had promised the team in 1958 that they would win a national championship within four years, if they could 'stick it out', as told by team-mates Billy Neighbors, Bill Oliver and Mal Moore.
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  • 1958
    Age 17
    After realizing Bryant's prophecy from 1958 in the undefeated 11–0–0 championship season of 1961, and after winning the Sugar Bowl, the National Championship and the MacArthur Bowl Trophy, multiple awards and recognitions followed suit (the following is a partial list).
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  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1940
    Born
    Born on July 11, 1940.
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Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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