Patricia Morison
Actress, singer
Patricia Morison
Patricia Morison is an American stage and motion picture actress and mezzo-soprano singer. She made her feature film debut in 1939 after several years on the stage. During her time as a screen actress she was lauded for her patrician beauty, with her large eyes and extremely long, dark hair among her most notable physical attributes. During this period of her career, she was often cast as the femme fatale or "other woman.
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Years Ago - Youngstown Vindicator
Google News - over 5 years
Twenty-four Youngstown district youngsters join the cast of Kenley Players in Warren as children in “The King and I,” starring Patricia Morison and Ted Scott. The children are Ricky Childress, Denise Barnes, Patty Chanson, Alane Chanson, Jim Rowland,
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••• Nouvelle salve RKO chez les Editions Montparnasse - ÉcranLarge.com
Google News - over 5 years
... (presque expressionniste à certains moments) et de la belle Patricia Morison (brune érotique à qui on aurait dû confier la vedette plutôt qu'à Maureen O'Hara) mais ce film d'espionnage dénonçant les menées fascistes à l'intérieur même des USA,
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PHOTO FLASH: Carole Cook, Mitzi Gaynor, JoAnne Worley, Barry Williams, et al ... - TheaterMania.com
Google News - almost 6 years
Among those in attendance were Joni Berry, Mitzi Gaynor, John Holly, Jackie Joseph, Ruta Lee, Patricia Morison, Dale Olson, David Rambo, JoMarie Ward, Marcia Wallace, and Martin Wiviott. Barnes was the musical director for Rowan and Martin's Laugh-In
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HOME VIDEO; Conan Doyle, On Holmes
NYTimes - almost 17 years
''It was really terribly important after the war when all the young men needed contacting,'' Sir Arthur Conan Doyle says rather breezily on camera during a 10-minute address he delivers on a DVD recently released by Focusfilm, a distributor in Ossining, N.Y. It was 1926, and by his remarks and manner the writer clearly wants to be done with his
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NYTimes article
PUBLIC LIVES
NYTimes - about 17 years
They Say Perdue Is Bad to the Bone The actor DANNY GLOVER, whose discrimination complaint last month prompted a city crackdown on cabdrivers, is facing criticism from an animal rights group that says he should withdraw as a host of a children's art contest sponsored by Perdue Farms, the poultry processor. ''Please divorce yourself from Perdue,''
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NYTimes article
The Magic of Opening Night
NYTimes - about 17 years
MATTHEW BRODERICK canceled at the last minute and Katie Couric didn't show. There was only one camera crew, and several audience members failed to come in black tie. But there was electricity in the air nonetheless as limousines pulled up and people crowded the sidewalk under the marquee for opening night of ''Kiss Me, Kate.'' Opening night on
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NYTimes article
So Who Rhymed Bianca With Sanka?
NYTimes - over 17 years
Joan Kibric was crying, and so was Ethel Watt. Heck, even Herb Fields, tall, handsome Herb Fields, the sole remaining ''boy singer,'' was crying, weeping so hard he had to leave his seat. The occasion was the reunion last week of most of the survivors of the original cast of ''Kiss Me, Kate,'' the Cole Porter musical getting a well-received revival
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THEATER; Shakespeare And Cole Porter, Together Again
NYTimes - over 17 years
YOU know the tale; it's Broadway's most relentless cliche. Today this musical is on the short list of classics, but in the 1940's it was universally viewed as a doom waiting to happen: based on a play that couldn't be adapted, with a cast of nobodies and an author thought to be deep in a conclusive losing streak. The show had to beg for its
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CABARET REVIEW; Why Cole Porter, Born 107 Years Ago, Lives On
NYTimes - over 18 years
It usually takes a centennial for a Broadway composer to be accorded the kind of attention that was lavished on Cole Porter at Town Hall on Tuesday evening on the 107th anniversary of his birth. But to his most ardent fans, Porter, who died in 1964, wasn't just a great theater composer but a kindred spirit with special knowledge about the ecstasy
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MOVIES THIS WEEK
NYTimes - over 18 years
Among the films brightening the television screen this week are an improved version of a Broadway play, World War II suspense, a corking thriller and a briny adventure. MGM did surprisingly well by THE WOMEN (1939), George Cukor's version of Clare Boothe's long-running stage catfest. The film has a superior cast, led by Norma Shearer, Joan Crawford
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Review/Music; An Updated Cole Porter, Through Loud Speakers
NYTimes - over 25 years
One couldn't help walking out of Carnegie Hall Sunday night wondering whether Cole Porter had been listening as much to us as we to him. Important music has a way of doing this. It tells audiences about a composer and his time but at the same time it holds a mirror up to what we have become. On the face of it, the Cole Porter 100th Birthday
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NYTimes article
Where Performers Converge, Collide and Sometimes Wield Chain Saws
NYTimes - over 25 years
The New York International Festival of the Arts begins tomorrow and runs through June 23. For information about events, call the appropriate box office. For general information, call (212) 768-1818. A schedule follows. Tomorrow PONG SAN, Korean masked dance drama, Asia Society, 725 Park Avenue, at 70th Street, Manhattan. Tomorrow, 8 P.M. (Also
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NYTimes article
Crowd Pleasers
NYTimes - over 25 years
Here is a sampling of summer pleasures in New York City. Dates and times are subject to change. This Week MADISON SQUARE GARDEN SUMMER CONCERTS. Jose Luis Rodriguez, a Venezuelan pop star; the tiniest swivel of his hips sends crowds into a frenzy, today, 4 P.M. Elvis Costello with the Replacements, June 22, 8 P.M. Tickets: $20 to $35. Information:
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Festival Of Arts Lowers Its Sights
NYTimes - almost 26 years
Three years after its first mammoth extravaganza drew almost as much criticism as applause, the New York International Festival of the Arts unveiled its plans yesterday for a second, more modest cultural celebration. This year's festival will run from June 8 to 23 and will feature more than 60 performing-arts events from 23 countries in 28 sites.
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RECORD NOTES/; Fairest 'Lady' Issued On CD
NYTimes - over 28 years
LEAD: Lest anyone still doubt the vitality of the American musical in this age of imported blockbusters, the recent hit recording of ''Show Boat'' with an operatic cast - not to mention best-selling recordings of the recent past like the similarly cast ''West Side Story'' - should confirm the enduring popularity of the native form. Lest anyone
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Festival Review/; A Concert Of Vintage Cole Porter
NYTimes - over 28 years
LEAD: Watching the distinguished parade of more than two dozen old-guard cabaret and Broadway performers celebrate the legacy of Cole Porter at Town Hall on Sunday, one was touched by the same sense of affectionate reunion that suffused the all-star concert revival of Stephen Sondheim's ''Follies'' two and a half years ago at Avery Fisher Watching
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AND NOW, THE INTERNATIONAL FESTIVAL OF THE ARTS; Mary Martin Leads 'Cole' Salute
NYTimes - over 28 years
LEAD: She was a self-described hayseed from Weatherford, Tex., who had never even heard the word striptease, let alone performed one. She was a self-described hayseed from Weatherford, Tex., who had never even heard the word striptease, let alone performed one. He was a famous composer and lyricist whose very name was synonymous with
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The Pop Life
NYTimes - over 28 years
LEAD: A Tribute to Mandela A Tribute to Mandela 'Freedomfest,'' an all-day concert at Wembley Stadium in London this Saturday, promises to be the most star-studded pop music event since Live Aid three years ago. A birthday tribute to Nelson Mandela, the imprisoned leader of the outlawed African National Congress, who will turn 70 on July 18,
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On Stage
NYTimes - almost 29 years
LEAD: Brightman Berlin Bound Sarah Brightman, the co-star of ''The Phantom of the Opera,'' will be leaving the show June 4, the evening before the Tony Award ceremony. A spokesman for the musical said the British actress had a concert commitment with the Berlin Philharmonic orchestra at the end of June. Brightman Berlin Bound Sarah Brightman, the
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NYTimes article
Arts Festival Lists Music Offerings
NYTimes - about 29 years
LEAD: The First New York International Festival of the Arts, scheduled in June and July, is announcing its offerings by discipline. Music, listed below, was officially announced today, with the other arts to be released over the next two weeks. The First New York International Festival of the Arts, scheduled in June and July, is announcing its
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Patricia Morison
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 2015
    Age 99
    Morison was also interviewed in the Los Angeles Times on March 7, 2015 and by namesake Patt Morrison on KPCC radio in Los Angeles.
    More Details Hide Details See: Patricia Morison performances
    In conjunction with her 100th birthday, the Pasadena Playhouse sponsored an evening with Patricia Morison on March 15, 2015, including an audience Q & A session and selections from Kiss Me, Kate performed by the guest of honor.
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    She lives in Los Angeles, California, where she celebrated her 100th birthday on March 19, 2015.
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  • 2014
    Age 98
    In March 2014, at age 99, she appeared onstage for Broadway Backwards 9, a benefit for Broadway Cares/Equity Fights AIDS and the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Community Center at the Al Hirschfeld Theater.
    More Details Hide Details She sang "Brush Up Your Shakespeare" from Kiss Me, Kate.
  • 2012
    Age 96
    In December 2012, at age 97, she appeared on stage in an evening entitled Ladies of an Indeterminate Age at the Pantages Theatre in Los Angeles.
    More Details Hide Details Her co-stars included Charlotte Rae and Anne Jeffreys.
  • 1999
    Age 83
    On November 18, 1999, Morison attended the opening night performance of the successful Kiss Me, Kate Broadway revival, the first such revival in New York, starring Brian Stokes Mitchell and Marin Mazzie (in the role Morison originated in 1948).
    More Details Hide Details Morison is one of the only known surviving cast members, and the only surviving featured player, from that original production. In recent years Morison has devoted herself to painting - one of her early passions - and has had several showings in and around Los Angeles. Never married and childless, she has lived in the Park La Brea, Los Angeles apartment complex since 1961.
  • 1978
    Age 62
    In November 1978 she again played the leading role in Kiss Me, Kate at the Birmingham Repertory Theatre in England.
    More Details Hide Details Morison made only three film appearances after her stage triumph in Kiss Me, Kate. These were a cameo part as writer George Sand in the biopic Song Without End (1960), co-starring Dirk Bogarde as composer Franz Liszt, another cameo in the comedy film Won Ton Ton, the Dog Who Saved Hollywood (1976), and as herself in the documentary Broadway - The Golden Years (2003).
  • FIFTIES
  • 1972
    Age 56
    In August 1972, she appeared in a production of The Sound of Music at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion in Los Angeles.
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  • 1971
    Age 55
    In 1971 she and Yul Brynner performed "Shall We Dance" from The King and I on a broadcast of the Tony Awards.
    More Details Hide Details Among her non-musical television performances were a recurring role on the detective series The Cases of Eddie Drake (1952) co-starring Don Haggerty on the DuMont Television Network and a guest appearance with Vincent Price on Have Gun - Will Travel (1958) starring Richard Boone. Years later she appeared in the made-for-TV movie Mirrors (1985) and a guest role in 1989 on the popular sitcom Cheers. box And that's why I love the theater... And I always feel that if in some way you can touch somebody, either touch them emotionally, or if it's a young person who wants to be an actor, touch them so he or she, too, wants to be an actor... it's so worthwhile. Throughout the 1960s and 1970s, Morison performed on stage numerous times - largely in stock and touring productions. These included both musical and dramatic plays, among them Milk and Honey, Kismet, The Merry Widow, Song of Norway, Do I Hear a Waltz? Bell, Book and Candle, The Fourposter, Separate Tables, and Private Lives.
  • FORTIES
  • 1964
    Age 48
    She also appeared with Howard Keel in a production of Kate on British television in 1964.
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  • 1958
    Age 42
    Morison and Alfred Drake recreated their Kiss Me, Kate roles in a Hallmark Hall of Fame production of the play broadcast in color on November 20, 1958.
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  • THIRTIES
  • 1954
    Age 38
    Morison also appeared in General Foods 25th Anniversary Show: A Salute to Rodgers and Hammerstein broadcast March 28, 1954 on all four American TV networks of the time.
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    Lawrence was subsequently replaced by Celeste Holm, Constance Carpenter, Annamary Dickey, and finally Morison, who appeared in The King and I until its Broadway closing on March 20, 1954, and then continued with the production on the national tour, which included a stop at the Los Angeles Civic Light Opera (from May 5, 1954).
    More Details Hide Details She played the role at the Municipal Theatre in St. Louis, Missouri; the production opened on June 11, 1959. During the 1950s and 1960s, Morison made several appearances on television, including several variety shows. Among these were a production of Rio Rita on Robert Montgomery Presents (1950) and a segment from The King and I on a 1955 broadcast of The Toast of the Town starring Ed Sullivan.
    In February 1954, Morison took over the role of Anna Leonowens in the Rodgers and Hammerstein production of The King and I, which co-starred Yul Brynner in his star-making role as the King of Siam.
    More Details Hide Details The play premiered in 1951, originally with Gertrude Lawrence as Leonowens.
  • 1948
    Age 32
    In 1948, Morison again abandoned her film career and returned to the stage, and achieved her greatest success.
    More Details Hide Details Cole Porter had heard her sing while in Hollywood and decided that she had the vocal expertise and feistiness to play the female lead in his new show, Kiss Me, Kate. Morison went on to major Broadway stardom when she created the role of Lilli Vanessi, the imperious stage diva whose own volatile personality coincided with that of her onstage role (Kate from The Taming of the Shrew). Kiss Me, Kate featured such songs as "I Hate Men," "Wunderbar", and "So in Love", reuniting Morison with her former Broadway co-star Alfred Drake. The play ran on Broadway from December 30, 1948 until July 28, 1951, for a total of 1,077 performances. Morison played in the London production of Kiss Me, Kate, which ran for 400 performances.
    Morison also starred in a 1948 espionage story, Sofia.
    More Details Hide Details After a long absence from the screen, Morris portrayed George Sand in the 1960 Franz Liszt biopic, Song Without End.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1944
    Age 28
    In 1944, Morison briefly abandoned her film work and returned to the Broadway stage.
    More Details Hide Details In April, she opened at the Adelphi Theatre in the musical comedy, Allah Be Praised! The play, however, was unsuccessful and closed after a very brief run of only 20 performances. Returning to films once again, Morison continued to be cast in supporting roles, all too often as femme fatales or unsympathetic "other women", including the Spencer Tracy-Katharine Hepburn vehicle, Without Love (1945), and the Deanna Durbin comedy-mystery Lady on a Train (1945). She played formidably villainous roles in the final installments of Universal's Sherlock Holmes series and MGM's The Thin Man series - respectively, Dressed to Kill (1946), and Song of the Thin Man (1947). She played the female antagonist in Tarzan and the Huntress (1947), the penultimate film starring Johnny Weissmuller as Edgar Rice Burroughs' title character. Her few leading roles during this time were in "B" pictures, notably as Maid Marian opposite Jon Hall's Robin Hood in the Cinecolor production The Prince of Thieves (1947), in the action film Queen of the Amazons (1947) and with Richard Arlen in the sepia-toned western The Return of Wildfire (1948). She played the role of Victor Mature's despairing, suicide-driven wife in Kiss of Death (1947). Her role was cut from the final print, over censorship concerns and the producers' reputed belief that audiences at that time were not ready for a scene depicting suicide.
  • 1942
    Age 26
    By 1942, the United States had become involved in World War II and, as a result, Morison became one of many celebrities who entertained American troops and their allies.
    More Details Hide Details In November of that year she joined Al Jolson, Merle Oberon, Allen Jenkins, and Frank McHugh on a USO Tour in Great Britain. Morison returned to acting in the cinema as a freelance performer. One of her better roles - albeit a small supporting one - was that of Empress Eugénie in The Song of Bernadette (1943) starring Jennifer Jones. She appeared in The Fallen Sparrow (1943) with John Garfield and Maureen O'Hara, and Calling Dr. Death (1945), one of the "Inner Sanctum" films, starring Lon Chaney, Jr.
  • 1939
    Age 23
    Also in 1939, Paramount considered her for the role of Isobel in their adventure film Beau Geste, starring Gary Cooper and Ray Milland, but she was replaced by Susan Hayward.
    More Details Hide Details The following year she appeared opposite Milland in the Technicolor romance Untamed, a remake of the Clara Bow vehicle, Man Trap (1926). Despite the promising beginnings, she was assigned to several second-tier pictures such as Rangers of Fortune (1940) and One Night in Lisbon (1941), both with Fred MacMurray, and The Round Up (1941) with Richard Dix and Preston Foster. On a loan-out to 20th Century-Fox she played one of her first villainess roles in Romance of the Rio Grande (1941), which starred Cesar Romero as the Cisco Kid. She left Paramount after a series of unrewarding roles, such as Night in New Orleans (1942), Beyond the Blue Horizon (1942), and Are Husbands Necessary? (1942).
    She made her feature film debut in 1939 after several years on the stage.
    More Details Hide Details She was lauded as a beauty with large eyes and extremely long, dark hair. During this period of her career, she was often cast as the femme fatale or "other woman". It was only when she returned to the Broadway stage that she achieved her greatest success as the lead in the original production of Cole Porter's Kiss Me, Kate.
  • 1938
    Age 22
    In 1938, Morison appeared in the musical The Two Bouquets, which ran for only 55 performances.
    More Details Hide Details Among the other cast members was Alfred Drake, who, years later, would star opposite Morison in the Broadway hit Kiss Me, Kate. While appearing in The Two Bouquets, Morison was noticed by talent scouts from Paramount Pictures, who - at the time - were looking for exotic, dark-haired glamorous types similar to Dorothy Lamour, one of their star commodities. Morison was subsequently signed to a contract with Paramount. She made her feature film debut in the "B" film Persons in Hiding (1939).
  • TEENAGE
  • 1935
    Age 19
    In 1935, four years before her official film debut, Morison made her first appearance on film in an automobile propaganda short, Wreckless.
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  • 1933
    Age 17
    Morison made her stage debut at the Provincetown Playhouse in the musical revue Don't Mind the Rain, in which she sang a song "Simple Silly I." Her Broadway debut came in November 1933, with a short-lived play, Growing Pains.
    More Details Hide Details After that, she proceeded to understudy Helen Hayes in the role of Victoria Regina. She understudied all the other women in the cast. Hayes, however, never missed a performance and Morison never had the opportunity to play the lead role.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1915
    Born
    Patricia Morison was born Eileen Patricia Augusta Fraser Morison in New York City on March 19, 1915, although some sources have erroneously given her year of birth as 1914.
    More Details Hide Details Her father, William Morison, was a playwright and occasional actor who billed himself under the name Norman Rainey. Her mother, Selena Morison (née Fraser) worked for British Intelligence during World War I. After graduating from Washington Irving High School in New York, Morison studied at the Arts Students League while taking acting classes at the Neighborhood Playhouse. She also studied dance under Martha Graham. During this time she was employed as a dress shop designer at Russeks Department Store.
Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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