Patricia Neway
American operatic and musical theatre singer
Patricia Neway
Patricia Neway was an American operatic soprano and musical theatre actress who had an active international career during the mid-1940s through the 1970s. One of the few performers of her day to enjoy equal success on both the opera and musical theatre stages, she was a regular performer on both Broadway and at the New York City Opera during the 1950s and 1960s.
Biography
Patricia Neway's personal information overview.
{{personal_detail.supertitle}}
{{personal_detail.title}}
{{personal_detail.title}}
Photo Albums
Popular photos of Patricia Neway
Relationships
View family, career and love interests for Patricia Neway
News
News abour Patricia Neway from around the web
Patricia Neway, 92, Soprano Star Of Opera And Broadway Stages
Arts Journal - about 5 years
For 15 years a principal at New York City Opera, Neway was particularly known for her work in contemporary operas. Her two most famous triumphs, both on Broadway, were as Magda Sorel in Menotti's opera The Consul and as the Mother Superior in the original run of The Sound of Music....
Article Link:
Arts Journal article
Opera New Jersey in Princeton: 'Family Room,' 'Consul,' 'Barber of Seville ... - Philadelphia Inquirer
Google News - over 5 years
In the central role of Magda Sorel, Lina Tetriani was a deeply sympathetic every-woman railing against fate - a great contrast to Patricia Neway, who originated the role as a fallen goddess with great moral force (to judge from the surviving video)
Article Link:
Google News article
Making A Case For Menotti - NPR (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Below, watch soprano Patricia Neway, who sang in the original production. Patricia Neway sings "To This We've Come" From The Consul. The fact that the The Consul opened at the Ethel Barrymore Theatre on Broadway (in 1949) is important
Article Link:
Google News article
John Strauss, 90, Composer; Wrote Theme for 'Car 54'
NYTimes - about 6 years
There's a holdup in the Bronx, Brooklyn's broken out in fights. There's a traffic jam in Harlem That's backed up to Jackson Heights. There's a scout troop short a child, Khrushchev's due at Idlewild. Car 54, where are you? Ask almost anyone over 50, and the song pours buoyantly forth, evoking one of television's best-loved comedies. The lyrics, by
Article Link:
NYTimes article
John Strauss, Composer of 'Car 54' Theme, Dies at 90
NYTimes - about 6 years
There's a holdup in the Bronx, Brooklyn's broken out in fights. There's a traffic jam in Harlem That's backed up to Jackson Heights. There's a scout troop short a child, Khrushchev's due at Idlewild. Car 54, where are you? Ask almost anyone over 50, and the song pours buoyantly forth, evoking one of television's best-loved comedies. The lyrics, by
Article Link:
NYTimes article
JAMES JOYCE-THE MUSIC OF HIS WORDS ON DISK
NYTimes - about 35 years
-------------------------------------------------------------------- Paul Kresh is a contributing editor of Stereo Review, where he reviews both popular and classical records, and is writing a book about spoken word recordings. By PAUL KRESH If you were thinking of celebrating the 100th anniversary of the birth of James Joyce this year by
Article Link:
NYTimes article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Patricia Neway
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 2012
    Age 92
    She died at her home in Corinth on January 24, 2012, aged 92.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 2008
    Age 88
    After retirement, Neway moved to Corinth, Vermont, where she lived with her second husband, John Francis Byrne, until Byrne's death in 2008.
    More Details Hide Details Her first marriage, to Morris Gesell, had ended earlier in divorce.
  • FIFTIES
  • 1970
    Age 50
    In 1970 she created the role of the Queen in the world premiere of Menotti's stage play, The Leper.
    More Details Hide Details Neway's other repertoire included Arnold Schönberg's Erwartung.
  • FORTIES
  • 1967
    Age 47
    In 1967, she appeared as Nettie in a special television production of Carousel, starring Robert Goulet as Billy Bigelow.
    More Details Hide Details Her featured solo was the song "You'll Never Walk Alone".
  • 1966
    Age 46
    In 1966, she made her first appearance at the San Francisco Opera, as the Governess in The Turn of the Screw.
    More Details Hide Details She returned there in 1972 to play the Widow Begbick in Kurt Weill's Rise and Fall of the City of Mahagonny.
  • 1964
    Age 44
    In 1964, she performed the role of Lady Thiang in The King and I at Lincoln Center with Risë Stevens as Anna and Darren McGavin as the King.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1963
    Age 43
    In 1963, Neway created the role of Jenny MacDougald in the world premiere of Carlisle Floyd's The Sojourner and Mollie Sinclair, in Raleigh, North Carolina, opposite Norman Treigle as Lachlan Sinclair, and conductor Julius Rudel.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1960
    Age 40
    The following November she returned to Broadway where she originated the role of the Mother Abbess in the original Broadway production of The Sound of Music, for which she won the Tony Award for Best Performance by a Featured Actress in a Musical, in 1960.
    More Details Hide Details
  • THIRTIES
  • 1959
    Age 39
    In June 1959, Neway returned to the Spoleto Festival to portray Geraldine in the world premiere of Samuel Barber's A Hand of Bridge (which she recorded in 1960).
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1958
    Age 38
    She continued with the production when it premiered on Broadway in November 1958, at the Martin Beck Theatre, under the umbrella of the NBC Opera Theatre.
    More Details Hide Details The following year she sang the role again with the New York City Opera in addition for recording the role for a national television broadcast on NBC.
    In August 1958, she sang the role of the Mother in the world premiere of Menotti's Maria Golovin at the Brussels World's Fair.
    More Details Hide Details
    Neway notably portrayed Miriam in the world premiere of Lee Hoiby's The Scarf at the very first Festival dei Due Mondi in Spoleto, Italy on June 20, 1958.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1957
    Age 37
    In 1957 she portrayed Madame de Croissy for NBC Opera Theatre's production of Poulenc's Dialogues of the Carmelites, with Rosemary Kuhlmann as Mother Marie, Elaine Malbin as Blanche, and Leontyne Price as Mme Lidoine.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1955
    Age 35
    In 1955, she sang in the world premiere of Raffaello de Banfield's Una lettera d'amore di Lord Byron in New Orleans, with Astrid Varnay.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1952
    Age 32
    Between 1952-1954 she was engaged as a principal soprano at the Opéra-Comique, in Paris.
    More Details Hide Details While there, she gave two of the greatest performances of her opera career, portraying the title role in Giacomo Puccini's Tosca, and the role of Katerina Mihaylovna in Franco Alfano's Risurrezione.
    While singing largely at the NYCO, Neway continued to perform with other opera companies and on Broadway. In 1952 she sang and recorded the title heroine in Gluck's Iphigénie en Tauride at the Aix-en-Provence Festival.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1951
    Age 31
    Her first appearance with the company was as Leah in the world premiere of David Tamkin's The Dybbuk on April 10, 1951, with Robert Rounseville as Channon.
    More Details Hide Details She also notably sang in the world premiere of Hugo Weisgall's Six Characters in Search of an Author in 1959, with Beverly Sills. Among the many other productions she appeared in with the NYCO were: Mascagni's Cavalleria rusticana (as Santuzza, conducted by Julius Rudel), Alban Berg's Wozzeck (as Marie, directed by Theodore Komisarjevsky), Menotti's The Consul (as Magda), Amahl and the Night Visitors (as the Mother), and The Medium (as Mme Flora), Bucci's Tale for a Deaf Ear (as Laura Gates), Carlisle Floyd's Wuthering Heights (as Nellie, opposite Phyllis Curtin as Catherine); Benjamin Britten's The Turn of the Screw (as the Governess, with Richard Cassilly as Peter Quint), and Richard Strauss's Salome (as Herodias), among others.
    In 1951, Neway made her debut with the New York City Opera (NYCO), where she returned often through 1966.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1950
    Age 30
    For her work in the Broadway production she won the Donaldson Award for Best Actress in a Musical in 1950.
    More Details Hide Details
    In 1950, Neway made opera history when she starred as Magda Sorel in the world premiere of Gian Carlo Menotti's critically acclaimed Cold War-era opera The Consul at the Shubert Theatre in Philadelphia, with Cornell MacNeil as John Sorel and Marie Powers as the Mother.
    More Details Hide Details Later that year, she went with the production to the Ethel Barrymore Theatre on Broadway, where it ran for 269 performances. She later recorded the role for Decca Records, and performed the role for the premieres in London, Paris, and other European cities. Neway, Kuhlmann, and Powers also performed these roles in the UK at the Cambridge Theatre in February 1951, with Norman Kelley playing the role of the magician Nika.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1948
    Age 28
    In 1948, she returned to Broadway to portray the Female Chorus in the United States premiere of Benjamin Britten's The Rape of Lucretia, at the Ziegfeld Theatre.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1946
    Age 26
    She made her first opera appearance in a leading role in 1946, as Fiordiligi in Così fan tutte, at Chautauqua Opera.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1944
    Age 24
    In April 1944 she was the soprano soloist in the world premiere of Norman Dello Joio's The Mystic Trumpeter with conductor Robert Shaw and the Collegiate Chorale at Town Hall.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1942
    Age 22
    While still a student, Neway made her Broadway debut as a member of the chorus in a 1942 production of Jacques Offenbach's La Vie parisienne.
    More Details Hide Details
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1919
    Born
    Born in 1919.
    More Details Hide Details
Original Authors of this text are noted here.
All data offered is derived from public sources. Spokeo does not verify or evaluate each piece of data, and makes no warranties or guarantees about any of the information offered. Spokeo does not possess or have access to secure or private financial information. Spokeo is not a consumer reporting agency and does not offer consumer reports. None of the information offered by Spokeo is to be considered for purposes of determining any entity or person's eligibility for credit, insurance, employment, housing, or for any other purposes covered under the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA)