Patrick Cockburn
Irish journalist
Patrick Cockburn
Patrick Oliver Cockburn is an Irish journalist who has been a Middle East correspondent since 1979 for the Financial Times and, presently, The Independent. Among the most experienced commentators on Iraq, he has written four books on the country's recent history. He won the Martha Gellhorn Prize in 2005, the James Cameron Prize in 2006 and the Orwell Prize for Journalism in 2009.
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News
News abour Patrick Cockburn from around the web
How the hard left's useful idiots are supporting Assad's war crimes
Huffington Post - 5 months
Last week, we received news that President Assad's regime in Syria had used chemical weapons on its people. Volunteer emergency workers working in the Sukkari district of Aleppo reported that Syrian forces had flown helicopters over the suburb and dropped barrel bombs of chlorine on the men, women and children going about their business below. This is just the latest in the Assad regime's catalogue of brutality. Last February, Assad's air force launched a series of missiles at a field hospital. Medics rushed to find any signs of life from the rubble and pull them into an ambulance. Assad's jets waited, returned, and then flew over the ambulance as they drove towards the hospital. They then dropped another bomb on the ambulance. 25 civilians were killed, among them eight medical workers. But the jets were not finished. They flew over another field hospital and dropped another bomb. The Economist reported that Ahmed Tarakji, the president of the Syrian American Medical Society, sa ...
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Huffington Post article
Moscow Nights in Latakia
Huffington Post - over 1 year
The swift Russian intervention into Syria exacerbates every one of the contradictory elements in Washington's various, unintegrated Middle East policies. That is one reason for the unexpected moves by Putin are deeply unsettling. They not only add a major variable, but that factor also involves a self-willed player ready and able to take initiatives which are not predictable or easy to counter. An already fluid field of action, thereby, is rendered even more turbulent by orders of magnitude. Another, related reason is that since the United States has no comprehensive strategy, the repercussions of the Russian actions, military and political, are generating a piecemeal reaction that finds it difficult to gain any intellectual or diplomatic traction in each policy sphere. Theoretically, these developments should highlight the need for such an overarching strategy by underscoring the costs of not having one. There is no evidence, though, of that happening within the Obama administra ...
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Huffington Post article
Isis: Inside the Army of Terror; The Rise of Islamic State – review
Guardian (UK) - almost 2 years
Two accounts – from Michael Weiss and Hassan Hassan, and from Patrick Cockburn – offer contrasting perspectives on the rise of jihadism in the Middle East Isis feeds first on state dysfunction, second on Sunni outrage. In Iraq, Sunni Arabs are a minority displaced from their privileged position by America’s invasion. Their revanchism is exacerbated by the sectarian oppression practised by the elected but Iranian-backed government. In Syria, Sunnis are an oppressed majority, the prime targets of a counter-revolutionary tyranny headed by mafias but claiming and exploiting Alawi sectarian identity. Under other names, Isis first grew in Iraq, as it would later in Syria, by exploiting resistance to occupation, American in the first case, that of a delegitimised regime in the other. Drawing on research by the Guardian’s Martin Chulov, Michael Weiss and Hassan Hassan show how Syria’s regime once collaborated with Iraqi Baathists and Salafist extremists, helping terrorists move to American-o ...
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Guardian (UK) article
ISIS Unites the World
Huffington Post - about 2 years
During the Cold War, science fiction writers and politicians like Ronald Reagan imagined that the threat of an invasion from outer space could break down ideological barriers and unify the world. The arrival of giant bug-eyed creatures bent on death and destruction would prompt world leaders to set aside their petty rivalries for the higher purpose of saving the planet. As it turned out, the Cold War and the immediate risk of nuclear annihilation disappeared without alien intercession. Since that time, other divisions and rivalries have replaced the East-West schism. And other substitutes for an alien threat have appeared as well, such as climate change and global pandemics. But world unity has yet to emerge out of the fractiousness of everyday geopolitics. The latest candidate for world unifier is the Islamic State (or ISIS). Although many commentators have described ISIS as somehow less-than-human, it doesn't come from outer space. It is decidedly a homegrown product of the turm ...
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Huffington Post article
Shortage of paramedics to blame for fatigue: official
Brandon Sun - over 4 years
Paramedic fatigue in rural areas is a reality that the Western Regional Health Authority is continually facing. Pat Cockburn, a senior adviser with the RHA, said a shortage of paramedics in southwestern Manitoba is to blame. "In the small, rural communities we do have challenges with
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Brandon Sun article
Syria: Houla massacre deepens fears of slide into full-blown civil war
China Worker - over 4 years
In struggle against brutal Assad regime, working class must oppose sectarianism and imperialist intervention Niall Mulholland, CWI The killing of 108 people near the Syrian town of Houla shocked and appalled people everywhere. Particularly abhorrent was the cold-blooded murder of 49 children, many of them shot at close range. The sectarian tensions fuelled by this barbaric act raise the terrible spectre of a slide towards broader conflict and all-out civil war. As always, working people and the poor will suffer the most. For 15 months, mass protests against the 40-year dictatorial rule of the Assad family have taken place in many parts of Syria. Initially they were part of the ‘Arab Spring’. However, in the absence of an independent working class movement leading the struggle, and with the increasing intervention by reactionary regimes like Qatar and Saudi Arabia, as well as imperialist meddling, the Syrian conflict is increasingly taking on the character of a civil war with mounting ...
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China Worker article
The Last Months of Osama bin Laden
Counter Punch - almost 5 years
The story behind the tracking down and killing of Osama bin Laden remains a puzzle despite the torrent of documentaries and articles appearing on the anniversary of his death. An absurdly high number of American political leaders, generals, security officials and former CIA and FBI agents have given interviews claiming a central role in the hunt for the leader of al-Qa’ida. Many attribute their inability to find and eliminate him in Afghanistan and Pakistan over 15 years to the blindness and incompetence of other parts of the US administration. Most appear to have convinced themselves of their own clear-sightedness and willingness to tell truth to power throughout the long pursuit. Much of this is fantasy. There are always those who delude themselves that they were the crucial brain behind any political, military or commercial success. The crop of those exaggerating their part in the hunt for Bin Laden is particularly high, because of obvious motives of career enhancement. President ...
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Counter Punch article
Goodbye to Hitch
New Statesman - almost 5 years
A New York memorial brought together Hitchens's comrades and friends. It was a fine goodbye to one of the New Statesman’s finest. Christopher Hitchens discovered himself as a journalist on the New Statesman in the 1970s. His comrades-in-writing of that amazing galère of talent the NS forged from the 1968 Oxbridge generation of intellectual-writing-activists were in New York last week to say goodbye. Martin Amis, James Fenton, Ian McEwan, Salman Rushdie, Henry Porter, as well as stellar foreign correspondents like Martin Walker and Patrick Cockburn came to pay tribute to the Englishman who had more impact on America in the last two decades than any other apart from Tony Blair. The most effective tribute came from his brother, Peter, He read one of St Paul’s letters to the Corinthians. There was a moment of shock at the seeming impertinence until Peter said they were the words Christropher chose to speak at the funeral of their father. As the cadences of the St James's Bible rolled out ...
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New Statesman article
The Crackdown in Bahrain
Counter Punch - almost 5 years
Double standards have notoriously marked Britain and America’s response to the Arab Spring. But nowhere is the hypocrisy more glaring than in their reactions to the uprisings in Bahrain and Syria, where both countries’ governments have used the full might of their security forces to crush peaceful protests and jail and torture their opponents. When it comes to Syria, Barack Obama and David Cameron express shock at the government’s repression and are voluble in their demands for regime change. Until recently, military intervention was not being ruled out. Contrast this with the words of President Obama’s spokesman after clashes between protesters and security forces in Bahrain last week. The best he could do was a purportedly even-handed condemnation of violence “directed against police and government institutions” and “excessive force and indiscriminate use of tear gas against protesters” by the Bahrain security forces. Imagine what an uproar there would be if the White House had s ...
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Counter Punch article
Syria is too far steeped in blood by negotiations
The Nation - almost 5 years
Patrick Cockburn In Northern Ireland it used to be called “the politics of the last atrocity”, when the latest act of violence and the retaliation it provoked dictated the direction of day-to-day politics. Syria has travelled far in this direction, its towns convulsed by mini-civil wars too bitter and bloodstained to end by mediation. It is this which is making it so difficult for ...
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The Nation article
Why Do They Hate George Galloway So Much?
Counter Punch - almost 5 years
The ferocity of the attacks on George Galloway by the British commentariat is one of the most revealing outcomes of his victory in the Bradford West by-election. News presenters saw no problem in conducting interviews with the newly elected MP that were largely a shower of insulting and unproven accusations. Columnists wrote thousands of shrill words warning readers that he and his victory were atypical and had no broader significance for the country. And, if his success did have any relevance, it was the ominous one of illustrating deepening racial division in Britain, despite the fact that  Galloway continually explained that he had won in non-Muslim as well as Muslim majority wards. There is an amusing half-hour to be spent watching YouTube clips of television interviews with  Galloway in the days after he was elected. With a few honorable exceptions – Sky was more even-handed here than the BBC or ITN – most of the interviewers appeared in the role of prosecuting attorneys. They h ...
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Counter Punch article
The Bradford West byelection: Labour has a lot to learn from George Galloway's ... - The Guardian
Google News - almost 5 years
Daily Mail The Bradford West byelection: Labour has a lot to learn from George Galloway's ... The Guardian I agree with Andrew Rawnsley's assertion that George Galloway's byelection victory in Bradford was mainly due to the repudiation of the three main political parties ("It's two fingers to Westminster, but don't expect a revolution", Comment). Playing the faith card is a risky game, George GallowayDaily Mail GEORGE GALLOWAY HAS BIG PLANS FOR BRADFORDExpress.co.uk Patrick Cockburn: Galloway won for some very good reasonsThe Independent Morning Star Online -Irish Times -Scotsman all 13 news articles »
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Google News article
Patrick Cockburn: Is Turkey's economic miracle about to fade away?
The Independent - about 5 years
Are the Turks seeing the Ottoman Empire reborn or are they going to be the next victims of economic chaos in Europe and political turmoil in the Middle East? Is Turkey about to pay a price for the overconfidence bred by a decade that brought it triumphant success while its neighbours suffered decline or disaster? Related Stories Man gored to death at Spanish 'burning bulls' festival Dutch teenager sets new solo sailing record Triangle of death: Surge in cancer cases in Italy linked to illegal dumping of toxic waste The ship twists and turns – and so does the captain and his story First ever triple-limb transplant in Turkey
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The Independent article
Patrick Cockburn: Whatever happens, a strong government is unlikely - The Independent
Google News - over 5 years
David Cameron and Nicolas Sarkozy were careful during their first visit to Libya since the overthrow of Muammar Gaddafi to avoid anything evoking comparisons with President Bush's "Mission Accomplished" rhetoric after the occupation of Iraq
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Google News article
Ahmadinejad Says 2 US Hikers Will Be Freed - Truthdig
Google News - over 5 years
By Ching Kwan Lee By Patrick Cockburn Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad has announced that two American hikers who were sentenced to eight years in prison on charges of espionage and illegal border crossing would be released on bail in
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Google News article
Turkish PM sets out on mission to become leader of Arab world - The Independent
Google News - over 5 years
The Turkish Prime Minister, Tayyip Erdogan, arrived in Egypt yesterday at the start of a three-nation tour as Turkey toughens its stance towards Israel and seeks to become the predominant power among Muslim states in the Middle East
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Google News article
Iraq cleric says his forces could attack US troops - The Independent
Google News - over 5 years
Any American troops remaining in Iraq after the end of the year will be attacked, according to Muqtada al-Sadr, the nationalist Shia cleric whose movement has previously fought to end the US occupation
Article Link:
Google News article
Patrick Cockburn: Al-Qa'ida, and the myth behind the war on terrorism - The Independent
Google News - over 5 years
The atrocities against America created the image of Osama bin Laden as the leader of a global jihad upon the West. It was a fantasy that governments willingly, and disastrously, helped to perpetuate What was the most devastating attack by al-Qa'ida in
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Google News article
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