Paul Lynde
Actor
Paul Lynde
Paul Edward Lynde was an American comedian and actor. A noted character actor, Lynde was well known for his roles as Uncle Arthur on Bewitched and Harry MacAfee, the befuddled father in Bye Bye Birdie. He was also the regular "center square" guest on the game show Hollywood Squares from 1968 to 1981.
Biography
Paul Lynde's personal information overview.
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News
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Sedaris siblings' 'The Book of Liz' has some pretty funny moments in Brookfield - Danbury News Times
Google News - over 5 years
Sources of inspiration are arguably Paul Lynde for Wright's fey portrayal of "Donny," and Samuel Beckett for Brother Hesikiah, a hunched over diminutive servant in black cape and long white beard who serves drinks only after a trajectory that
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Weekend racism trifecta in effect! - Wizbang (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Talk about Paul Lynde calling Charles Nelson Reilly gay. What's truly daffy is believing that scientists are immune from the politics and greed and cliques and jealousy and petty squabbles that permeate non-scientists' lives. How does a scientist react
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America's Got Talent: The end of the road for Katy's Daniel Joseph Baker - Houston Chronicle (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Paul Lynde would like his square back, thanks. (NBC) PopLyfe and Lys Agnés are called to the stage together, and told that they are both going through. Despite the dramatics, this is not much of a surprise, especially when Nick Cannon explains that
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GOP Presidential Hopeful Fred Karger Talks Fox News, Iowa And Marcus ... - Mediaite.com
Google News - over 5 years
... and a group of atheists came over, we're chatting, and they had just taken pictures of Marcus Bachmann. I said, like, “Oh my God, you've met him? What was he like? How is he?” And they said, “Oh, well, somewhere between Paul Lynde and Liberace.”
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Muny farewells: 'Bye Bye Birdie' and bye bye to Paul Blake - Belleville News Democrat
Google News - over 5 years
Lewis J. Stadlen channels his best Paul Lynde as the dad and Leslie Denniston embodies a '60s housewife well. But Michael Harp of Belleville is the scene-stealer here. The fourth-grader at St. Teresa's School displays strong singing and crisp comedic
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If Everybody Wiggles Their Noses, Maybe It'll Stop The Bewitched Reboot - Queerty
Google News - over 5 years
Its cast, save for Elizabeth Montgomery as Samantha the witch, was stocked with lesbian and gay actors like Agnes Moorhead, Dick Sargent and Paul Lynde, who gave winking performances. And the show's entire premise was a metaphor for living in the
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Blake says bye-bye to Muny with 'Birdie' - STLtoday.com
Google News - over 5 years
All the principals do lively work, along with Susan Cella as Albert's overbearing mother and Leslie Denniston and Lewis J. Stadlen (channeling a hint of Paul Lynde, who created the role) as Kim's parents. Teeter is at his breezy best in "Put on a Happy
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Comedy this week: Bryan Bruner and Ron Feingold - Appleton Post Crescent
Google News - over 5 years
Center-square comedian Paul Lynde once said, “Comedy is exaggerated realism. It can be stretched to the almost ludicrous, but it must always be believable.” Check out this week's lineup of comics who are sure to stretch the truth at least once in a
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Vintage Gayness: Charles Nelson Reilly As A Banana - Queerty
Google News - over 5 years
Along with fellow comedic actor Paul Lynde, Reilly helped pave that road with a bold and identifiable—yet determinedly unique—gay manner. They milked more gay humor from inside the closet than most performers have from outside it
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The smell of fair is in the air - Uinta County Herald
Google News - over 5 years
I remember the voice of Paul Lynde, speaking for Templeton, ecstatic over the sensory overload presented by the county fair. While I do not typically dance through the remnants of other people's trash, as Templeton would, I will fully immerse myself in
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Deep Inside Hollywood - pride source.com
Google News - over 5 years
There are a lot more gay biopics left to be shot, too, so if Franco wants he can just keep going and give us movies about Paul Lynde, Rock Hudson, Charles Nelson Reilly, Keith Haring, Montgomery Clift and Sylvester before moving on to the life of
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TV INTERVIEW: JANEANE GAROFALO - Buzzine
Google News - over 5 years
I know Paul Lynde, from Hollywood Squares, among other things… Bewitched. Paul Provenza? That does not ring any bells...How would I know Paul Provenza? Is he a comic? JG: Maybe that's why I don't know him. NR: We're in the green room of The Green Room
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"Jersey Boys": A hit for all Seasons - OnMilwaukee.com
Google News - over 5 years
It's too bad that Jonathan Hadley is channeling Paul Lynde and overplaying lyricist and record producer Bob Crewe's gayness. Cheap laughs are not needed in this show. The abundance of professional stage productions in Wisconsin precludes me from
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Withering Glance: Maybe he's 'gay-acting' - Minneapolis Star Tribune
Google News - over 5 years
It's like Paul Lynde in the movie version of "Bye Bye Birdie," playing the happy hubby and papa. Except in reverse. CP: People conclude that this guy is secretly gay, but he may simply be gay-acting, just as some gays act straight
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Stephen Colbert Takes On Gay History Education In California (VIDEO) - Huffington Post (satire)
Google News - over 5 years
According to him it started in ancient Greece and didn't emerge again until the the 1970s when Paul Lynde was given the center square. To reply to a Comment: Click "Reply" at the bottom of the comment; after being approved your comment will appear
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Jake's tops Taste of Knox County - Mount Vernon News
Google News - over 5 years
20 event will include a meeting with Amelia Earhart, Will Rogers and Mount Vernon's Paul Lynde, followed by a classic aviation movie. (Virgil Shipley) Last week provided several days of good drying weather for farmers. Richard Montgomery, who farms
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Bachmann Rumor Grows Louder - msnbc.com
Google News - over 5 years
(Anyone out there old enough to remember Paul Lynde?) As Stewart joked, the guy is “an Izod shirt away from being the gay character on Modern Family.” Clips of the comedians' faux “comedy repression” session promptly popped up on the websites of such
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An evening of illuminati(on) - Dallas Voice
Google News - over 5 years
(Todd seemed pretty happy about the fact that he gets to do his Paul Lynde impersonation on stage, by the way.) The final performances of the show, directed by Justin Flowers, start at 8 pm each night Friday, Saturday and Sunday, July 15-17,
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Paul Lynde
    FIFTIES
  • 1982
    Age 55
    On January 11, 1982, after Lynde had failed to attend a birthday celebration, his friend Paul Barresi became concerned.
    More Details Hide Details When he and another friend, actor Dean Ditman, could not get an answer on the phone or from knocking on his door, Barresi broke into the side entrance to Lynde's home in Beverly Hills, California and found him dead in his bed. Stories suggesting Lynde had a visitor at the time of his death who fled the scene circulated but could not be proven, as the comedian regularly activated his house alarm before retiring for the evening. When Barresi broke in, the alarm blared, indicating Lynde was alone at the time of his death. The coroner ruled the death a heart attack. Lynde's cremated remains are interred at Amity Cemetery, in Amity, Ohio, next to those of his brother Johnny and sister Helen. His father and mother are buried at the same cemetery. Paul Lynde's popularity and admiration of him have continued since his 1982 death. A biography was published in 2005, titled Center Square: The Paul Lynde Story. Authors Steve Wilson and Joe Florenski described Lynde as "Liberace without a piano" and that to most 1970s-era viewers, he was a frustrated bit player and "character actor on a daytime game show." To the homosexual community, his reputation was less than stellar: "In some ways, he came to symbolize what's perceived to be a self-loathing era for gay culture."
  • 1981
    Age 54
    He returned to the series in the spring of that year and remained with the show until its cancellation in February 1981.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1980
    Age 53
    Lynde became sober and drug-free in early 1980.
    More Details Hide Details At this time, Hollywood Squares was experiencing a downward trend in ratings. Lynde did not want to return but changed his mind when he received co-star billing with host Peter Marshall.
  • 1979
    Age 52
    He appeared as Indian chief Nervous Elk alongside former Bye Bye Birdie co-star Ann-Margret in the 1979 comedy The Villain, (released as "Cactus Jack" in the UK) which was to be his final film role.
    More Details Hide Details Lynde had become disenchanted with being what he called "boxed into" Hollywood Squares and departed the series that same year. Acting jobs continued to be scarce, although it is unclear if this was due to homophobia or Lynde's known substance abuse and alcohol problems, which made him difficult to work with.
  • 1978
    Age 51
    As demand for his services declined, he took whichever opportunities. He appeared as a guest weatherman for WSPD-TV in Toledo, Ohio in 1978.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1977
    Age 50
    Lynde suffered from weight-control problems and was honored in 1977 by Weight Watchers.
    More Details Hide Details That year, Lynde's beloved dog, Harry MacAfee, died. Lynde could not stay in the house without him and later bought a new home. He spent heavily to renovate the house.
  • FORTIES
  • 1976
    Age 49
    Lynde was a regular guest on the 1976–79 variety show Donny & Marie until 1978.
    More Details Hide Details On January 4, he was arrested outside of a tavern in Salt Lake City at approximately 1:30 a.m. for interfering with a police officer. The officer, who was investigating a car burglary, claimed Lynde kept insisting that the officer "attend to Lynde's complaint that his briefcase with $1,000 in cash and valuables inside had been stolen." The complaint was later dropped, but he lost his guest-starring role on Donny & Marie as a result.
  • 1975
    Age 48
    Despite his personal problems, Lynde's continuing popularity led to his being signed by ABC to host a series of specials from 1975 to 1979, including:
    More Details Hide Details Lynde was involved in an incident at his alma mater, Northwestern University, in October 1977. He was the Grand Marshal for homecoming. At a fast food restaurant after the homecoming parade, he made racist remarks and gestures to an African-American man, who was a professor at the university. Lynde blamed his behavior on fatigue and inebriation.
  • 1974
    Age 47
    ABC resuscitated it, with additional changes in cast (most notably, Alice Ghostley replaced Sudie Bond in the role of Lynde's sister Edwina) and premise, in the summer of 1974, when it ran for two months.
    More Details Hide Details Neither actor's presence in the cast helped the show's flagging ratings and this series, too, was not renewed and was replaced permanently by Happy Days. Despite Lynde's popularity, his presence and humor worked better as comic relief in smaller doses. In addition to the unsuccessful The Paul Lynde Show and Temperatures Rising, Lynde starred in four failed television pilots in the 1960s: Of the four shows, only the Victorian detective spoof Sedgewick Hawk-Styles: Prince of Danger was initially picked up by ABC, only to be cancelled at the last minute. William Asher commented in the A&E Biography entry on Lynde that the network had reservations about Lynde, most notably his offscreen behavior and the persistent rumors of his homosexuality. Lynde was regularly admired by his peers during his lifetime. Mel Brooks once described Lynde as being capable of getting laughs by reading "a phone book, tornado alert, or seed catalogue." In 1976 Lynde received an Entertainer of the Year Emmy award for being voted the funniest man of the year, which he immediately turned over to host Jackie Gleason (who never won an Emmy award during his lifetime), citing him as "the funniest man ever." This gesture was totally unexpected and shocked Jackie Gleason.
  • 1973
    Age 46
    Lynde was "transferred" to Temperatures Rising for the 1973–74 season.
    More Details Hide Details The trick did not work and the ratings for The New Temperatures Rising were poor within weeks of the premiere. ABC cancelled the show mid-season, its time slot taken by mid-season replacement Happy Days.
  • 1972
    Age 45
    In 1972, Lynde starred in a short-lived ABC sitcom, The Paul Lynde Show, playing an uptight attorney and father at odds with his liberal-minded son-in-law.
    More Details Hide Details The series was a contractual fulfillment to ABC in place of an aborted ninth season of Bewitched. Lynde starred as Paul Simms, the father of a family that consisted of wife Martha (Elizabeth Allen) and daughters Barbara (Jane Actman) and Sally (Pamelyn Ferdin). It also starred John Calvin as Barbara's husband, Howie, and Jerry Stiller and Anne Meara as Howie's parents. Critics perceived the show as a derivative of All in the Family, then television's most-popular primetime program, although many admitted the writing was top notch and the sexual connotations gave it an extra bit of spice. Lynde was nominated for a Best Actor Golden Globe for the show. Scheduled opposite the first half of the Top 30 hit The Carol Burnett Show on CBS and the Top 20 hit Adam-12 on NBC, the series garnered low ratings and was canceled after a single season.
  • THIRTIES
  • 1966
    Age 39
    In 1966, Lynde debuted on the fledgling game show Hollywood Squares and quickly became its iconic guest star.
    More Details Hide Details Eventually he assumed a permanent spot as the "center square," a move which ensured that he would be called upon by contestants at least once in almost every round. Despite an urban legend to the contrary, Lynde remained in the center at the producers' discretion. Many NBC tour guides have claimed that Lynde was afraid of earthquakes and the center square proved to be the safest square of the show's set. An anecdote related during the A&E Biography on Lynde described an earthquake that occurred during the Hollywood Squares taping that frightened and alarmed many of the guests. Lynde remained in his seat, tapping his fingers, asking if they were going to finish the show. On Hollywood Squares Lynde was best able to showcase his comedic talents with short, salty one-liners, spoken in his signature sniggering delivery. Many gags were thinly veiled allusions to his homosexuality. Asked, "You're the world's most popular fruit. What are you?" Lynde replied, "Humble." Asked how many men are on a hockey team, Lynde said, "Oh, about half." Asked whether it was against the law in Texas to call a Marine a "sissy," Lynde quipped, "I guess I’ll have to take the law into my own hands."
  • 1961
    Age 34
    During the 1961-62 television season he was a regular on NBC's The Perry Como Show as part of the Kraft Music Hall players with Don Adams, Kaye Ballard and Sandy Stewart.
    More Details Hide Details He was a familiar face on many sitcoms, including The Phil Silvers Show, The Munsters, The Flying Nun, Gidget, I Dream of Jeannie, F Troop, and variety shows such as The Ed Sullivan Show and The Dean Martin Show. Lynde's best known sitcom role was on Bewitched, where he made his debut appearance in the first season episode "Driving Is the Only Way to Fly." His role as Samantha Stephens's nervous driving instructor Harold Harold was well received by viewers, as well as series star Elizabeth Montgomery and her husband, director/producer William Asher, with both of whom Lynde became good friends. Asher then created the recurring role of Endora's practical-joking brother Uncle Arthur. Lynde made 10 appearances on Bewitched as the beloved character, and was regularly seen with Montgomery and Asher off the set as well. Lynde also did extensive voice work on animated cartoons, particularly those of Hanna-Barbera Productions. His most notable roles included The Hooded Claw in The Perils of Penelope Pitstop, Mildew Wolf from It's the Wolf (a segment of Cattanooga Cats), and Pertwee from Where's Huddles? He also voiced gluttonous rat Templeton in the animated feature Charlotte's Web. Lynde's sardonic inflections added a dimension to such lines as the sly, drawn-out whine, "What's in it for meeee?" His distinctive voice remains popular among impressionists. Although it is sometimes assumed that actress Alice Ghostley based her speech patterns and mannerisms on Lynde's, according to actress Kaye Ballard "it was Paul who was influenced by Alice".
  • 1960
    Age 33
    Lynde returned to Broadway in 1960 when he was cast as Harry MacAfee, the father in Bye Bye Birdie.
    More Details Hide Details He also played the role in the 1963 film adaptation. That year, he recorded a live album, Recently Released, issued as an LP record. All six tracks were written by him. Once he could afford writers, he rarely used his own material until his tenure on Hollywood Squares years later. Lynde was in great demand in the 1960s.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1956
    Age 29
    After the revue's run, Lynde co-starred in the short-lived 1956 sitcom Stanley opposite Buddy Hackett and Carol Burnett, both of whom were also starting their careers in show business.
    More Details Hide Details That year, he guest starred on NBC's The Martha Raye Show.
  • 1952
    Age 25
    Lynde made his Broadway debut in the hit revue New Faces of 1952 in which he co-starred with fellow newcomers Eartha Kitt, Robert Clary, Alice Ghostley, and Carol Lawrence.
    More Details Hide Details In his monologue from that revue, the "Trip of the Month Club," Lynde portrayed a man on crutches recounting his misadventures on the African safari he took with his late wife. The show was filmed and released as New Faces in 1954.
  • 1948
    Age 21
    He graduated in 1948 and moved to New York City, where he initially worked as a stand-up comic.
    More Details Hide Details
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1926
    Born
    Born on June 13, 1926.
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Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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