Penelope Milford
American actor
Penelope Milford
Penelope Milford is an American film, stage, and television actress. She has been nominated for the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress, in 1979 for performance on the movie Coming Home.
Biography
Penelope Milford's personal information overview.
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FILM REVIEW; Harmless? That's Just His Manner
NYTimes - over 18 years
The minute Louisa (Carri Levinson), the young bespectacled schoolteacher, walks in the door, you know she's too prim and repressed not to mean trouble. By the end of the movie, she's bound either to blossom into a ravenous sexual being or to kill somebody. Too bad the same thing isn't as clear about Henry (Neil Giuntoli). Audiences at ''Henry:
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NYTimes article
Review/Film; When a Not-So-Bad Girl Turns Very, Very Bad
NYTimes - almost 28 years
LEAD: Heather is the name of choice at Westerburg High School, the name that signifies power, popularity and unlimited license to make mischief. The rules of the game are established in an early scene in ''Heathers,'' in which a trio of girls named Heather cruise the school cafeteria with a reluctant handmaiden named Veronica (Winona Ryder) in tow.
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FILM: 'GOLDEN SEAL,' FLIPPERS AND MAGIC
NYTimes - over 33 years
PETS are hard to come by on the Aleutian Island of Unak, where a boy named Eric lives with nary a squirrel to play with in ''The Golden Seal,'' which opens today at the Eastside Cinema. Alone with his parents on the rocky isle, Eric - whose father calls him Boy - longs for a puppy, which he is planning to name Girl. Just after the puppy proves
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THEATER: 'TERRITORIAL RITES,' BY CAROL K. MACK
NYTimes - over 33 years
ROBIN GROVES, who plays the central role in Carol K. Mack's ''Territorial Rites,'' is a fresh acting talent. With her large expressive eyes and tentative but unaffected manner, she beautifully projects that evanescent quality called vulnerability. That fact was first evident this season at the New Play Festival at the Actors Theater of Louisville,
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NYTimes article
GOING OUT GUIDE
NYTimes - over 33 years
HALF A LOAF The lunchtime loafing season is upon us, the time when office workers and shoppers alike look for a quiet and cool spot to sit and see city life flash by from comfortable observation points in midtown. International Paper Plaza, which opened last week, is named for the big, black building it adjoins and belongs to at 77 West 45th
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TV: 'THE ROSEMARY CLOONEY STORY'
NYTimes - about 34 years
AN irritating example of the kind of television biography that seems to be revealing a lot but is really carefully vague can be found on CBS at 9 o'clock tonight. ''Rosie: The Rosemary Clooney Story'' begins with the popular singer's nervous breakdown in 1968. Sitting in a mental institution, she struggles to remember her past, beginning with the
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TELEVISION WEEK
NYTimes - about 34 years
FILMING A LIFE What is it like to watch the making of movie about your life? "Uncomfortable," the singer Rosemary Clooney said in a recent telephone interview. She visited the set once during the filming of the television movie "Rosie: The Rosemary Clooney Story," which CBS will broadcast Wednesday from 9 to 11 P.M. Sondra Locke portrays Miss
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'TAKE THIS JOB,' A MAN GOES BACK HOME
NYTimes - over 35 years
The song ''Take This Job and Shove It'' delivers that line right off the bat, whereas the movie takes 90 minutes to get around to it. That ought to give some idea of the relative directness of the two undertakings. The movie, which opened yesterday at the Cinerama and other theaters, has a tendency to meander and no real reason not to. Its most
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BROOKE SHIELDS IN ZEFFIRELLI'S 'ENDLESS LOVE'
NYTimes - over 35 years
THERE are two sorts of people who'll be going to see ''Endless Love'' - those who have read the richly imaginative novel on which the movie is based and those who have not. There will be dismay in the first camp, but it may be nothing beside the bewilderment in the second. Anyone unfamiliar with the story of Scott Spencer's novel is bound to be
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PLAY: WELLER'S 'FISHING' REVIVED AT SECOND STAGE
NYTimes - almost 36 years
WHEN Michael Weller's ''Fishing'' first appeared at the Public Theater in 1975, it was regarded as an unofficial sequel to the playwright's ''Moonchildren.'' Looking at it now, in a lovely revival at the Second Stage, ''Fishing'' seems more like a warm-up for Mr. Weller's ''Loose Ends.'' Either way, this is a transitional play, about 60's children
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Penelope Milford
    FORTIES
  • 1989
    Age 40
    Endless Love (1981), and The Golden Seal (1984), she also appeared as Pauline Felming in the 1989 cult film Heathers.
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  • THIRTIES
  • 1979
    Age 30
    She has been nominated for the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress, in 1979 for performance on the movie Coming Home.
    More Details Hide Details An alumnus of the Chicago/New York theatrical scene (and an original cast member of the Broadway hit musical Shenandoah), American actress Penelope Milford struck paydirt with her first film Coming Home (1978). Playing Viola Munson, the best friend of Sally Hyde (Jane Fonda), Penelope was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress. She did not win, but the strength of Coming Home, Milford was cast in a major TV biography, Seizure: The Story of Kathy Morris (1979), the tale of a real-life singer's recovery from a brain-surgery induced coma. The highlight of this production was the final scene, wherein the real Kathy Morris replaced Milford in the final concert scene, proof of her total recovery; Milford's performance had been so authentic that the switch was all but imperceptible. Few of Milford's subsequent films did her talent justice: the outgoing blonde actress was seen in pedestrian roles in such pedestrian pictures as Take This Job and Shove It (1981).
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1948
    Born
    Born on March 25, 1948.
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