Pete Rugolo
American composer
Pete Rugolo
Pietro "Pete" Rugolo was an Italian-born jazz composer and arranger.
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News
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Pete Rugolo, award-winning composer and arranger, dies at 95
LATimes - over 5 years
<a class="fplink fp-218408" href="/pete+rugolo">Pete Rugolo</a>, an award-winning composer and arranger who came to prominence in the world of jazz as the chief arranger for Stan Kenton’s post-World War II band and later wrote the themes for TV’s “The Fugitive” and “Run for Your Life,” has died. He was 95. Rugolo, who also had a recording career with his own band, died Sunday of age-related causes at a nursing facility in Sherman Oaks, said his daughter, Gina Rugolo Judd. As a composer and the chief arranger for Kenton from 1945 to 1949, Rugolo is credited with being a major force in shaping the progressive jazz sound of the Stan Kenton Orchestra. “Big bands of the Swing Era were on their way out, and he came along and brought this remarkable new life to that big band instrumentation,” music critic Don Heckman told The Times. Rugolo won the DownBeat magazine poll as best arranger in 1947 -- the first of five wins as best arranger over the next seven years. After leaving Kento ...
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LATimes article
El fuego central - Revista Ñ
Google News - almost 6 years
Fletcher Henderson, Benny Goodman, Jimmie Lunceford, Count Basie o Woody Herman, como más tarde las grandes bandas de la Costa Oeste, de Pete Rugolo a Doc Severinsen, respetaron esta regla al pie de la letra. Y la letra afirma, nos recuerda el poeta y
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Herbie Mann, 73, Musician Who Gave Flute a Jazz Sound
NYTimes - over 13 years
Herbie Mann, who helped to popularize the flute as a jazz instrument and to introduce the music of other cultures into the mainstream of American jazz, died on Tuesday at his home in New Mexico. He was 73 and lived in a cabin in Pecos, near Santa Fe. The cause was prostate cancer, his family said. Mr. Mann's first instrument was the clarinet, and
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NYTimes article
Was It Madness or Just Badness? Murder and More
NYTimes - over 19 years
Hardly a frame passes in ''This World, Then the Fireworks,'' a stylized 1950's-style film-noir mood piece, when you don't have a nagging sense that the actors aren't living up to the genre that the movie exalts with a smothering reverence. Adapted from a posthumously published story by the pulp-fiction writer Jim Thompson, the film ravenously sinks
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NYTimes article
Review/Dance; A Lesson From the 1940's: Expression in Just a Few Bold Strokes
NYTimes - almost 23 years
Today's experimental choreographers could learn a thing or two from the solos that Daniel Nagrin created in the 1940's. Three are part of the Limon Dance Company's current season and the first two, revived on Wednesday night, are not to be missed. The Joyce Theater (175 Eighth Avenue, at 19th Street, Chelsea) is a perfect frame for these corrosive
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NYTimes article
RECORD NOTES; Something Borrowed, Something New
NYTimes - almost 26 years
Plus ca change . . . or, it seems to me I've heard that cover before. A new CD package from Columbia Records certainly looked, at quick glance, like a reissue of a Columbia LP from the 1950's. The title -- "I Like Jazz!" -- was the same, and the artwork seems identical: photographs of people representing various walks of life, but all saying the
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NYTimes article
June Christy, Singer, 64, Is Dead; Gained Fame With Kenton's Band
NYTimes - over 26 years
LEAD: June Christy, whose wistful, foggy alto epitomized ''cool'' jazz singing in the 1940's and 50's, died Thursday at the age of 64 at her home in Los Angeles. June Christy, whose wistful, foggy alto epitomized ''cool'' jazz singing in the 1940's and 50's, died Thursday at the age of 64 at her home in Los Angeles. The cause of death was
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NYTimes article
JAZZ SINGER REFINES THE SCAT SINGING TRADITION
NYTimes - almost 32 years
The foundations for the art of scat singing appear to have been firmly established 60 years ago when Louis Armstrong expanded on his instrumental improvisations by singing parallel lines of nonsense syllables, exemplified in the title of his 1926 recording with his Hot Five, ''Skid- Dat-De-Dat.'' Since then, many variations of Mr. Armstrong's
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NYTimes article
CRITICS' CHOICES; JAZZ
NYTimes - over 34 years
Strictly speaking, Laurindo Almeida is not a jazz guitarist since he is not an improviser. He is classically based and plays from written scores. But he first became known in the United States, after coming here from his native Brazil, during the three years that he was a featured soloist with Stan Kenton's orchestra from 1947 to 1950. Because he
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NYTimes article
LAURINDO ALMEIDA, EVERYONE'S 'AMIGO,' IN TOWN
NYTimes - over 34 years
LAURINDO ALMEIDA, the guitarist who became a star with Stan Kenton's orchestra 35 years ago and whose playing is part classical, part jazz and all Brazilian, is being his full tripartite self this weekend, tonight through Sunday, at Village West, 575 Hudson Street. Mr. Almeida's program, on which he is accompanied by Michael Fleming on bass, is
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NYTimes article
OLD KENTON BANDSMEN REMEMBER THEIR LEADER
NYTimes - over 34 years
NINE one-time members of Stan Kenton's orchestra joined forces Sunday to create a program in tribute to the late band leader at Avery Fisher Hall on the final day of this year's Kool Jazz Festival. It was a presentation that succeeded to a remarkable degree in catching the excitment and color and theatricality of Mr. Kenton's music. Mel Lewis, one
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THE MAKING OF A WRITER
NYTimes - almost 35 years
OF the making of writers there is no end till The End unmakes them. Here's how Yours Truly tells his Once upon a time: Twins It is my fate and equally my sister's to have been born oppositesex twins, with an older brother and no younger siblings. Much is known about ''identical'' (monozygotic) twins, less about ''fraternal'' (dizygotic) twins, less
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NYTimes article
'PHILLY FLASH,' A BURNETT-ARKIN ROMP
NYTimes - over 35 years
Considering the caliber of its leading players, ''Chu Chu and the Philly Flash'' is an amazingly charmless movie. Alan Arkin and Carol Burnett might be expected to generate some interest by virtue of their mere presence in the film, but they are teamed up for a painfully contrived tale, playing lovable losers who aren't lovable at all. Flash (Mr.
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NYTimes article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Pete Rugolo
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 2011
    Age 95
    Rugolo died, aged 95, on October 16, 2011 in Sherman Oaks, California.
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  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1920
    Age 4
    Rugolo was born in San Piero Patti, Sicily, Italy. His family emigrated to the United States in 1920 and settled in Santa Rosa, California.
    More Details Hide Details He began his career in music playing the baritone horn, like his father, but he quickly branched out into other instruments, notably the French horn and the piano. He received a bachelor's degree from San Francisco State College, and then went on to study composition with Darius Milhaud at Mills College in Oakland, California and earn his master's degree. After he graduated, he was hired as an arranger and composer by guitarist and bandleader Johnny Richards. He spent World War II playing with altoist Paul Desmond in an army band. After WWII, Rugolo worked for Stan Kenton, who headed one of the most musically 'progressive' big bands of the era. Rugolo provided arrangements and original compositions that drew on his knowledge of 20th century music, sometimes blurring the boundaries between jazz and classical music. While Rugolo continued to work occasionally with Kenton in the 1950s, he spent more time creating arrangements for pop and jazz vocalists, most extensively with former Kenton singer June Christy on such albums as Something Cool, The Misty Miss Christy, Fair and Warmer! Gone for the Day and The Song Is June! Other singers he arranged for included Ernestine Anderson, Harry Belafonte, Nat King Cole, Billy Eckstine, the Four Freshmen, Peggy Lee, Patti Page, Mel Tormé and Kitty White. During this period he also worked for a while on film musicals at MGM, and served as an A&R director for Mercury Records in the late 1950s.
  • 1915
    Born
    Born in 1915.
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