Peter Buffett
American musician and writer
Peter Buffett
Peter Andrew Buffett is an American musician, composer, author and producer. Buffett is the second son of investor Warren Buffett and his late wife Susan Buffett.
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Peter Buffett's personal information overview.
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Peter Buffett, Warren Buffett's Son, Says Millennials Will Blaze New Trail In Philanthropy
Huffington Post - over 3 years
When it comes to rethinking how charity works, philanthropist Peter Buffett believes millennials have a lot to give. "Younger people have the appetite and idealism and energy for it like nobody else [to] imagine new structures," he told policymic.com. Buffett, a musician who's perhaps best known as Warren Buffett's son, says Gen-Yers might want to start with a cause that hits close to home. "If I were 25 years old, I’d be first of all looking in my backyard," he explained to policymic. "This is sort of a different version of 'be the change you want to see in the world.' If you really wanna do it, do it at home. Then do it at the community, the state level, and the national level. It'll grow out if it works." While Buffett, 55, grew up as the offspring of one of the world's richest men, he has forged his own identity in the nonprofit sector. According to the Financialist, he received $1 billion in Berkshire-Hathaway stock from his father in 2006 and used it to open the NoVo Fou ...
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Huffington Post article
Are Nonprofits Designed to Fail?
Huffington Post - over 3 years
There's a story often told in nonprofit circles to inspire hope. It's the one about the starfish, which in one version goes like this: A man is walking on a beach and comes across a little girl tossing stranded starfish back into the water. Seeing the multitudes of other starfish, he asks, "Does that really make a difference?" "It does to this one," says the little girl, and another starfish sails over the waves. I hate that story. Yes, I know that it's meant to encourage individuals to act, and of course that's good. But here's what gets me: it also masks failure as success. Too often, the starfish story is told to justify a charitable effort that's not making real change. When our starfish rescuer shows up for work tomorrow, there's going to be a whole new batch of starfish. Time spent saving a few is time spent not solving the underlying problem. There are some who think that describes much of the nonprofit sector. Peter Buffett, the philanthropist son of billionaire ...
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Huffington Post article
Christopher T. Gates: A Second Front for Democracy Reform
The Huffington Post - over 3 years
Peter Buffett recently called for a "new operating system" for philanthropy. Which got us thinking about operating systems, philanthropy and democracy. That's why we're calling for a "second front" in the battle for money-in-politics reform. It's time for a truly board conversation about how we can fix a system that is so clearly broken. Writing in the New York Times, Buffet quoted Albert Einstein who said that you couldn't solve a problem with the same mind-set that created it. "Money should be spent trying out concepts that shatter current structures and systems that have turned much of the world into one vast market," Buffet suggests. "One vast market" - that's what many people think U.S. politics and policy making has become. This market, dominated by super PAC's and large donors, thwarts or seriously dilutes most efforts to promote public health, address pernicious environmental problems, create a more sane and stable financial industry, reform our education ...
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The Huffington Post article
Idealist: Why We Need to Overhaul Philanthropy: Interview With Peter Buffett
Huffington Post - over 3 years
This interview originally appeared on Idealist Careers. In late July Peter Buffett, son of billionaire Warren Buffet and co-chair of the NoVo Foundation, wrote an op-ed in the New York Times, arguing that too much of philanthropy is focused on making the donor feel good, and not on providing actual solutions to pressing social problems. This behavior, which he refers to as "philanthropic colonialism," perpetuates inequality instead of eradicating it. The article sparked a sector wide debate with some praising Peter's assessment that we pay too much attention to donors and not enough attention to new systems while others stating that he oversimplifies the problem without offering any solutions. (Read a roundup of responses on the Chronicle of Philanthropy.) We talked to Peter about why he wrote the article, his reflections on the responses, and why he thinks everyone who works in the philanthropic sector needs to be "driven to lose their jobs." Let's start at t ...
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Huffington Post article
Claudia Jacobs: Uncircling the Wagons: Philanthropists Who Didn't Cause Our Social Problems
Huffington Post - over 3 years
Peter Buffett's op-ed this summer in the New York Times pointed to the irony of the mega-wealthy cloaking themselves with the accoutrements of philanthropy and campaigning against social ills while wealth accumulation itself contributed to some of those very problems. Begging the question, is philanthropy tantamount to a PR campaign to keep the awful truth from oneself? This controversial article was a gigantic wake-up call to the sometimes sleepy established philanthropic world. Commentators came out of the woodwork, arguing for or against certain aspects of the challenges Buffett had posed. Finally there was something to debate, offer mea culpas, and disagree about. Clearly, Buffett struck a nerve. But meanwhile the Luddites of the philanthropic world are quietly smashing some of the elitist notions inherent in Buffett's provocative article. These are philanthropists without mega-wealth, quietly meeting in living rooms to pool sometimes only small amounts of resourc ...
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Huffington Post article
Is Billionaire Philanthropy Fueling Inequality?
Huffington Post - over 3 years
Peter Buffett, the second son of billionaire investor Warren Buffett, worries that the state of philanthropy in America “just keeps the existing structure of inequality in place.” At meetings of charitable foundations, he says “you witness heads of state meeting with investment managers and corporate leaders. All are searching for answers with their right hand to problems that others in the room have created with their left.” Describing the stunning growth of what he calls a “charitable-industrial complex,” his recent New York Times op-ed reads in confessional style: “People (including me) who had very little knowledge of a particular place would think that they could solve a local problem.”
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Huffington Post article
Dan Cardinali: Reflecting on Peter Buffett's Challenge
Huffington Post - over 3 years
When the son of one of America's biggest philanthropists takes to the New York Times to denounce this country's "charitable-industrial complex," you would assume that a certain amount of fur is going to fly -- mostly mink and sable, in this case. Sure enough, Peter Buffett ignited a firestorm of controversy by attacking the "conscience laundering" of deep-pocketed philanthropists who give money to sleep better at night without examining their own role in perpetuating systemic inequality. If you haven't been following the conversation, try Googling Peter Buffett's name. It won't take long to get up to speed, and the debate will prove inherently interesting to anyone in the nonprofit realm who has ever had to ask a funder for money. Personally, I objected to several aspects of Mr. Buffett's piece, especially his propensity to question the motives of people who are trying to do good things. But at the end of the day, Mr. Buffett also raised some serious questions in an hone ...
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Huffington Post article
April Rudin: Doing Good While Doing Well--The New Mantra Of Next-Gen Wealth
Huffington Post - over 3 years
As F. Scott Fitzgerald wrote in his short story "The Rich Boy" in 1926: "Let me tell you about the very rich. They are very different from you and me. They possess and enjoy early, and it does something to them, makes them soft where we are hard, and cynical where we are trustful, in a way that, unless you were born rich, it is very difficult to understand." Most of Fitzgerald's works revolved around the "rich" vs. the "poor." Specifically, he was intrigued by what we would now call "wealth inheritors" vs. others which are known as "wealth creators." Today, there are even more notable differences between these groups of ultra-high-net-worth and high-net-worth individuals than during Fitzgerald's time. In fact, the rich are very different from each other. Back in the roaring '20s there were two roads to riches: Instant millionaires who got rich through the surging economy and stock market, and the older generation who were already wealthy and followed the path of passing ...
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Huffington Post article
Michele Vonetes Bongiovanni: The Perpetual Poverty Machine
Huffington Post - over 3 years
I recently attended the NEXUS Summit at the United Nations -- a group of young activists, social entrepreneurs and philanthropists dedicated to making the world a better place. At the forum, Peter Buffett (son of Warren Buffett) spoke eloquently about what he calls the "perpetual poverty machine" and the "big business" of philanthropy. His recent New York Times op- ed addressed the need for total systemic change in the world of philanthropy and, I would submit, we need the same in most of our other systems, including business, civic and government sectors. For example, in the business world, every time I've personally tried to innovate solutions that would add to transparency and trust in business or help propel sustainability initiatives, I'm told, "Great idea, but we can't focus on that now." It's all about short-term profits, not investing in innovative, leading-edge concepts that can really effect change. This is exactly what the "B Team" and Arianna Huffington ci ...
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Huffington Post article
Zack Exley: The Unglamorous Truth About Ending Poverty: A Response to Peter Buffett
Huffington Post - over 3 years
Dear Peter Buffett, My heart started pounding four sentences into your Saturday New York Times op-ed piece. You condemned "Philanthropic Colonialism," and told us about donor meetings where the people pledging crumbs to fight poverty are often the same people creating it. I used to go to meetings like those, though a few levels down the food chain. I had to stop because they just made me too angry. You said what many other donors and recipients see but are afraid to admit: the anti-poverty philanthropy boom is not reducing poverty, and might actually be perpetuating it. I couldn't wait to finish the article, and shared it with everyone I could, because I was just so happy that someone in your position was saying these things. Then I read the rest. You said, "My wife and I know we don't have the answers, but we do know how to listen. As we learn, we will continue to support conditions for systemic change. It's time for a new operating system. Not a 2.0 or a 3.0, but ...
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Huffington Post article
Peter Buffett: Change Our Story: Stories
Huffington Post - over 3 years
"How I got here doesn't tell me who I am" -- Open Hearted Hand What do you believe and why do you believe it? We have been living out of stories that we're told. Stories we tell ourselves about ourselves, stories history books tell us, the newspapers tell us, our parents tell us etc... We decide whether we believe in these stories or not. And build quite complex cases to justify our position. But where did these stories begin? If you look deep enough, every story comes from fear or fearlessness. History books -- stories written by the victors -- either by morals or by might. The stories are built around "us vs. them" -- and not just conquest of countries and people, but nature and spirit as well. Parents tell stories to their children -- lived out as values and influences that are a direct reflection of what they needed -- and did or didn't get -- as children themselves. Society -- stories told through a myriad of laws (spoken and unspoken), media and ...
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Huffington Post article
Peter Buffett: Change Our Story: A New Societ-e
Huffington Post - over 3 years
When I think about writing a new blog, it's amazing how easy it is to get paralyzed when I consider how little I know regarding just about any given subject. Or when I read how many ways people can look at just about any given subject. There are a many brilliant thinkers out there and large populations of passionate people... factions are many and deep. For instance, it's amazing to me how these little graphics get immediately created to display a political opinion or a philosophical stance. It's like we all have a little desktop ad agency to sell our point of view -- or we just copy and paste something that says it better than we could have. Here's an example. Which brings me back to my struggle with something to say. There are so many people saying so many things. Crazy numbers of online communities within communities.... I can't imagine what this will develop into. But it seems impossible to imagine people staying circled around old institutions for much long ...
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Huffington Post article
Peter Buffett: Change Our Story: How Much Is Enough?
The Huffington Post - over 3 years
I keep coming back to the question, "how much is enough?" Now you may think that's a pretty ironic question coming from the son of one of the richest people in the world. But actually, it might just make me an expert on the subject. You see, my dad is the poster boy for the question. He has all the money anyone could ever want and he doesn't need another house, fancier food, more people around him telling him he's important, more stuff on his shelves or the latest electronic gadget in his pocket. None of it would make him happier than he is already -- doing what he loves. So how much is enough? What are these CEOs and hedge fund guys spending their money on... or more importantly why? Who needs that much money? Their need to line their pockets and hoard as much as possible speaks to the larger question of personal responsibility; moral bankruptcy and a need to fill a bottomless hole caused by... what? The American dream is mostly just that... a dream. Which doesn't ...
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The Huffington Post article
Peter Buffett: When the Hallowed Become Hollow
Huffington Post - almost 4 years
Hallowed: 1) holy, consecrated (the church stands on hallowed ground) 2) sacred, revered (the university's hallowed halls) (hallowed customs) Hollow: an unfilled space : cavity, hole It seems that institutions that once seemed paramount to a "civilized," prosperous and growing culture are crumbling -- or at least being brought into question -- like never before. Or maybe we're just more aware of it because of the scale of the problem and speed of the news cycle. I'm not sure you can even call it a "cycle" anymore. It's a fire hose of information and misinformation. ... of opinion, fact and speculation -- usually disguised as one of the others. Generally speaking, things crumble when they get brittle. And things that are brittle, by definition, are stiff.... "stuck in their ways" you might say. The opposite of fluid... willing to take on different shapes as the landscape changes. Systems -- ways of operating according to certain principles -- I'm guessing gen ...
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Huffington Post article
Buffett's kids use dad's ideas to invest in giving
San Francisco Chronicle - over 4 years
Buffett's kids use dad's ideas to invest in giving Associated Press Copyright 2012 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. Updated 9:34 a.m., Saturday, September 29, 2012 (AP) — As they work to give away part of Warren Buffett's roughly $47 billion fortune, his three children have adopted an approach that looks remarkably similar to their father's technique for making all that money. The Buffett children have all been running foundations their parents set up for them since the late 1990s, but they had to dramatically increase their giving after 2006 when Warren Buffett announced his overall giving plan and the children received their first annual gift of stock worth roughly $65 million to each of them. Howard Buffett regularly travels to poverty-stricken parts of the world to talk with farmers and check up on projects his foundation has funded, but the 57- ...
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San Francisco Chronicle article
Warren Buffett boosts pledge to 3 charities his children run to give them each $2.1B in stock
Fox News - over 4 years
Warren Buffett is celebrating his 82nd birthday by giving each of his three children a big present: about $600 million worth of his company's stock for their charitable foundations. Buffett announced the gifts in a letter made public Thursday, saying he is rewarding his children for the way they've run their foundations. The new contributions, added to previous gifts, mean they'll each receive about $2.1 billion in stock over time. In 2006, Buffett promised to give roughly $1.5 billion of Class B Berkshire Hathaway stock to each of the foundations his children run as part of a plan give the bulk of his fortune to charity. The biggest share of Buffett's $44.7 billion fortune will go to the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. Another sizable gift will go to the Susan Thompson Buffett foundation that Buffett created with his first wife. He did not change those pledges on Thursday. Buffett said he decided to increase the amount h ...
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Fox News article
Ben Affleck Attends Children Mending Hearts Spring Benefit
Green Celebrity Network - almost 5 years
Children Mending Hearts (CMH) held its 4th Annual Spring Benefit honoring young heroes in the community and raise awareness for CMH’s new global after-school program for at-risk children on Sunday. This year’s honorees included Bethany Hamilton (Soul Surfer) and Carson Meyer (Teen Board Advisor), who are making waves by making a difference. Past Honorees include Maria Bello, Anderson Cooper, Eve Ensler, Bill Gates, Sr. and Luc Robitaille. Among the guests at Sunday’s event were Ben Affleck and his daughter, Seraphina. Photo: Splash News: Toby Canhan In the theme of surf and sun, the event celebrated family, fun, art and citizenship. Designed for the entire family, the event included with art activities, musical guests, fun interactive surfing and skating demos and games for everyone with music by DJ Connor Cruise and a musical performance by Trevor Jackson. All proceeds to benefit Children Mending Hearts, which provides global arts and education to Los Angeles’ underserved youth ...
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Green Celebrity Network article
Bill Clinton And John Legend To Appear At Million Meals Concert
Green Celebrity Network - almost 5 years
John Legend and Bill Clinton will make appearances at a special charity concert in New York in May. The Clarins Million Meals Concert for FEED celebrates The FEED Foundation's fifth anniversary and will feature an exceptional evening of talent with a special appearance by former President Bill Clinton. The concert will include performances by John Legend, Natasha Bedingfield, Alan Gilbert, Violinist and Conductor of the New York Philharmonic, Violist David Aaron Carpenter and Christoph Eschenbach, Pianist and Conductor of the National Symphony Orchestra. The featured orchestra of the evening will be the Salomé Chamber Orchestra. $1000 tickets include access to the pre-concert reception and a FEED/Clarins gift. $500 tickets include a FEED/Clarins gift. The FEED Foundation was co-founded in 2008 by Lauren Bush, and is dedicated to raising awareness and funds to ensure nutritious school meals for all children as a first step to improving the global food system. To find out more ...
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Green Celebrity Network article
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