Peter Tosh
Jamaican reggae musician
Peter Tosh
Peter Tosh, was a Jamaican reggae musician who was a core member of the band The Wailers (1963–1974), and who afterwards had a successful solo career as well as being a promoter of Rastafari. Peter Tosh was born in Grange Hill, Jamaica, and was raised by his aunt. He began to sing and learn guitar at an early age, inspired by American radio stations.
Biography
Peter Tosh's personal information overview.
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NEW MUSIC; ‘SuperHeavy,’ With Mick Jagger, and ‘Where Are the Arms’ - Review
NYTimes - over 5 years
SUPERHEAVY “SuperHeavy” (A&M) SuperHeavy seems less an artistic collaboration than a temporary marketing partnership of a product called Middle-Aged Pop Music L.L.C.  Mick Jagger, Joss Stone and Damian Marley are the primary singers. They wrote the self-titled album’s songs, together with Dave Stewart, formerly of the
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NYTimes article
Hot shot: Shaggy talks about his time in the Corps and his new CD, 'Summer in ... - ArmyTimes.com
Google News - over 5 years
A lot of Peter Tosh, too. Q. So If I'm in the military right now with aspirations to make it in music — maybe one of those Marines who was cajoled into the Corps with a picture of you — what kind of advice would you offer? A. The main thing you can
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Google News article
Christie's to Auction Richard Gere's Guitar Collection in October - JustLuxe.com
Google News - over 5 years
Guitars previously owned by Jamaican reggae musician Peter Tosh and American blues guitarist Albert King are included. A guitar owned by Jimmy D'Aquisto, who is best known as being the premier maker of custom guitars from the 1960s until his death in
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Jamaican Star to grace 24th Peter Tosh memorial concert - Times of Zambia
Google News - over 5 years
AMONG the numerous political campaign posters stack around the cosmopolitan city of Lusaka, is that of one world acclaimed legendary reggae musician Peter Tosh who breathed his last 24 years ago. He is not in any way a political candidate
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Reggae Scion Andrew Tosh Stands Up For Dad Peter's Equal Rights - Houston Press (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
23 2011 at 12:00 PM ​With fellow Jamaican musicians including Bob Marley and Bunny Wailer, singer/guitarist Peter Tosh formed the Wailing Wailers in the early '60s. Shortly thereafter, the now-trio would help lay the foundation for reggae music
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Richard Gere puts vintage guitars up for sale - RTE.ie
Google News - over 5 years
Instruments once owned by reggae star Peter Tosh and Blues singer Albert King will be included in the sale. Digital Spy quotes Gere as saying: "They have been my true friends through the best and worst of times. I never planned to put together a ... - -
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The Roundup: Peter Tosh Estate Sponsors a 'Legalize It' Video Contest - East Bay Express
Google News - over 5 years
Peter Tosh's estate is partnering with Amnesty International and Greenpeace for re-release of reggae albums Legalize It and Equal Rights. The Tosh estate also is collaborating with Students for a Sensible Drug Policy and Marijuana Policy Project,
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Peter Tosh Estate Partners With Political Advocacy Organizations - Huffington Post
Google News - over 5 years
WASHINGTON -- The estate of reggae legend Peter Tosh has announced a series of partnerships aimed at bringing his music to a new generation of political activists. Partnering with Greenpeace, Amnesty International and other advocacy organizations,
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Reggaefest set for this weekend - The Salinas Californian
Google News - over 5 years
The Wailers, a band started by Bob Marley, Peter Tosh and Bunny Wailer in 1963, is perhaps the most recognized band that made the transition through all three stages of early Jamaican popular music: ska, rocksteady and reggae
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It's a Tosh-up! - Toronto Sun
Google News - over 5 years
On the cover of his classic album, Legalize It, reggae legend Peter Tosh is sitting in a field of marijuana plants puffing on a pipe. While Tosh is rightfully remembered as a musical revolutionary, his close friend and
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Reggae Legend, Peter Tosh's Legacy Grows Columbia Legacy releases double CDs ... - South Florida Caribbean News
Google News - over 5 years
KINGSTON, Jamaica - Peter Tosh's songs, "Legalize It" and "Bush Doctor" have become 'herb' standards. Released in 1977, "Legalize It", though banned from air play in Jamaica, could still be heard in yards all over the island
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Tosh Family Works To Bring Equal Rights and Justice - Crawdaddy! The Magazine of Rock
Google News - over 5 years
Niambe McIntosh was just five-years-old in 1987 and living in America when her father, Peter Tosh, was murdered in Jamaica. Twenty four years later, the high school math teacher and special educator and youngest of Tosh's 10 children lives in Boston
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A cool new hymnal - Updated Anglican song book features work of Peter Tosh ... - Jamaica Gleaner
Google News - over 5 years
International reggae icons Peter Tosh and Ernie Smith are included in the hymnal. So too are other Jamaican musical luminaries Noel Dexter, Father Richard Ho Lung, Rev Easton Lee and the late Professor Barry Chevannes. Hypnotic gems like By the Rivers
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Peter Tosh: Reclaiming A Wailer - NPR
Google News - over 5 years
But in the years since they became the most prominent reggae band of all time, another name has diminished in history: Peter Tosh. Check out an alternate version of 'Get Up, Stand Up' from the reissued 'Equal Rights,' plus a classic from 'Legalize It.'
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Peter Tosh
    FORTIES
  • 1987
    Age 42
    On 11 September 1987, just after Tosh had returned to his home in Jamaica, a three-man gang came to his house on motorcycles and demanded money.
    More Details Hide Details Tosh replied that he did not have any with him but the gang did not believe him. They stayed at his residence for several hours and tortured him in an attempt to extort money from Tosh. During this time, Tosh's associates came to his house to greet him because of his return to Jamaica. As people arrived, the gunmen became more and more frustrated, especially the chief thug, Dennis "Leppo" Lobban, a man whom Tosh had previously befriended and tried to help find work after a long jail sentence. Tosh said he did not have any money in the house, after which Lobban put a gun to Tosh's head and shot once, killing him. The other gunmen began shooting, wounding several other people and also killing herbalist Wilton "Doc" Brown and disc jockey Jeff "Free I" Dixon who had worked for the Jamaica Broadcasting Corporation (JBC). Tosh's "long time companion" Andrea Marlene Brown, his drummer Carlton "Santa" Davis, musician Michael Robinson and Jeff "Free I" Dixon's wife, Yvonne were wounded during the robbery.
    He was awarded a Grammy Award for Best Reggae Performance in 1987 for No Nuclear War, his last record.
    More Details Hide Details Along with Bob Marley and Bunny Wailer during the late 1960s, Peter Tosh became a devotee of Rastafari. At some point after his departure from the Wailers, Tosh developed an interest in unicycles; he became a unicycle rider, being able to ride forwards and backwards and hop. He often amused his audiences by riding onto the stage on his unicycle for his shows. His teacher for unicycling was Kelly Carrigan. They rode side by side for years.
    In 1987, Peter Tosh seemed to be having a career revival.
    More Details Hide Details
  • THIRTIES
  • 1984
    Age 39
    In 1984, after the release of 1983's album Mama Africa, Tosh went into self-imposed exile, seeking the spiritual advice of traditional medicine men in Africa, and trying to free himself from recording agreements that distributed his records in South Africa.
    More Details Hide Details Tosh had been at odds for several years with his label, EMI, over a perceived lack of promotion for his music. Tosh also participated in the international opposition to South African apartheid by appearing at Anti-Apartheid concerts and by conveying his opinion in various songs like "Apartheid" (1977, re-recorded 1987), "Equal Rights" (1977), "Fight On" (1979), and "Not Gonna Give It Up" (1983).
  • 1978
    Age 33
    During Bob Marley's free One Love Peace Concert of 1978, Tosh lit a marijuana spliff and lectured about legalizing cannabis, lambasting attending dignitaries Michael Manley and Edward Seaga for their failure to enact such legislation.
    More Details Hide Details Several months later he was apprehended by police as he left Skateland dance hall in Kingston and was beaten severely while in police custody. Mystic Man (1979), and Wanted Dread and Alive (1981) followed, both released on Rolling Stones Records. Tosh tried to gain some mainstream success while keeping his militant views, but was only moderately successful, especially when compared to Marley's achievements. That same year, Tosh appeared in the Rolling Stones' video Waiting on a Friend.
    In 1978 the Rolling Stones record label Rolling Stones Records contracted with Tosh, on which the album Bush Doctor was released, introducing Tosh to a larger audience.
    More Details Hide Details The album featured Rolling Stones frontmen Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, and the lead single – a cover version of The Temptations song "Don't Look Back" – was performed as a duet with Jagger. It made Tosh one of the best-known reggae artists.
  • 1977
    Age 32
    His second album Equal Rights followed in 1977.
    More Details Hide Details Tosh organized a backing band, Word, Sound and Power, who were to accompany him on tour for the next few years, and many of whom performed on his albums of this period.
  • 1976
    Age 31
    Tosh began recording and released his solo debut, Legalize It, in 1976 with CBS Records company.
    More Details Hide Details The title track soon became popular among endorsers of marijuana legalization, reggae music lovers and Rastafari all over the world, and was a favourite at Tosh's concerts.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1974
    Age 29
    After Island Records president Chris Blackwell refused to issue his solo album in 1974, Tosh and Bunny Wailer left the Wailers, citing the unfair treatment they received from Blackwell, to whom Tosh often referred with a derogatory play on Blackwell's surname, 'Whiteworst'.
    More Details Hide Details Tosh had written many of the Wailers' hit songs such as "Get Up, Stand Up", "400 Years", and "No Sympathy".
  • 1973
    Age 28
    In 1973, Tosh was driving home with his girlfriend Evonne when his car was hit by another car driving on the wrong side of the road.
    More Details Hide Details The accident killed Evonne and severely fractured Tosh's skull. He survived, but became more difficult to deal with.
  • 1970
    Age 25
    The Wailers had moved from many producers after 1970 and there were instances where producers would record rehearsal sessions that Tosh did and release them in England under the name "Peter Touch".
    More Details Hide Details
    The collaboration had given birth to reggae music and later, bassist Aston "Family Man" Barrett and his brother, drummer Carlton Barrett would join the group in 1970. The band signed a recording contract with Chris Blackwell and Island Records company and released their debut, Catch a Fire, in 1973, following it with Burnin' the same year.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1967
    Age 22
    He then returned to Jamaica in early 1967 with a renewed interest in music and a new spirituality.
    More Details Hide Details Tosh and Bunny were already Rastafarians when Marley returned from the U.S., and the three became very involved with the Rastafari faith. Soon afterwards, they renamed the musical group The Wailers. Tosh would explain later that they chose the name Wailers because to "wail" means to mourn or to, as he put it, " express one's feelings vocally". He also claims that he was the beginning of the group, and that it was he who first taught Bob Marley the guitar. The latter claim may very well be true, for according to Bunny Wailer, the early Wailers learned to play instruments from Tosh. Rejecting the up-tempo dance of ska, the band slowed their music to a rocksteady pace, and infused their lyrics with political and social messages inspired by their new-found faith. The Wailers composed several songs for the American-born singer Johnny Nash before teaming with producer Lee Perry to record some of the earliest well-known reggae songs, including "Soul Rebel", "Duppy Conqueror", and "Small Axe".
  • 1966
    Age 21
    Marley spent much of 1966 in Delaware in the United States of America with his mother, Cedella (Malcolm) Marley-Booker and for a brief time was working at a nearby Chrysler factory.
    More Details Hide Details
  • TEENAGE
  • 1964
    Age 19
    In 1964 Tosh helped organize the band The Wailing Wailers, with Junior Braithwaite, a falsetto singer, and backup singers Beverley Kelso and Cherry Smith.
    More Details Hide Details Initially, Tosh was the only one in the group who could play musical instruments. According to Bunny Wailer, Tosh was critical to the band because he was a self-taught guitarist and keyboardist, and thus became an inspiration for the other band members to learn to play. The Wailing Wailers had a major ska hit with their first single, "Simmer Down", and recorded several more successful singles before Braithwaite, Kelso and Smith left the band in late 1965.
  • 1962
    Age 17
    He then changed his name to become Peter Tosh and the trio started singing together in 1962.
    More Details Hide Details Higgs taught the trio to harmonize and while developing their music, they would often play on the street corners of Trenchtown.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1944
    Born
    Born on October 19, 1944.
    More Details Hide Details
Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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