Phylicia Rashād
American actress
Phylicia Rashād
Phylicia Rashād is an American Tony Award-winning actress and singer, best known for her role as Clair Huxtable on the long-running NBC sitcom The Cosby Show. In 2004, Rashād became the first African-American actress to win the Tony Award for Best Performance by a Leading Actress in a Play, for her role in the revival of A Raisin in the Sun.
Biography
Phylicia Rashād's personal information overview.
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News
News abour Phylicia Rashād from around the web
This Girl Was Bullied For Her Skin Color. Now She's A Badass Model.
Huffington Post - 4 months
Bullies, be gone.  Khoudia Diop is a 19-year-old from Senegal who has faced bullying throughout her life simply because of the color of her skin.  “I was picked on by other kids, when I was a bit younger because [of the darkness] of my skin tone,” she told The Huffington Post. “But this is something that is actually quite normal in Senegal. It’s not a nice feeling and I’ve had to learn to love myself more every day and tune out the negativity, which helps a lot!” (A 2015 survey revealed between 52 and 67 percent of Senegalese women use skin lightening products, Quartz previously reported.) Diop’s story of overcoming bullying and rising to success touched thousands. She’s now aspiring to be a model and is also working with The Colored Girl, Inc., a group that promotes self-love and celebrates women of all backgrounds.  She’s also amassed an Instagram fanbase of over 200,000 and shares words of wisdom and empowerment with her followers.  “We have lots of ...
Article Link:
Huffington Post article
Michael Che Definitely Dropped The N-Word During The 'Saturday Night Live' Premiere
Huffington Post - 5 months
We can’t imagine Lorne Michaels is too impressed with “Saturday Night Live” cast member Michael Che right now.  During “Weekend Update” on last night’s Season 42 premiere of the sketch comedy show, Che dropped the n-word while discussing Colin Kaepernick’s protest of the national anthem. The comedian and his “Weekend Update” co-host, Colin Jost, debated “The Star-Spangled Banner,” with Jost admitting he liked the anthem and Che siding with Kaepernick.  Che asked, “If the national anthem was so important, how did they know somebody was kneeling?” before adding, “That’s how boring the national anthem is ― halfway through it you’re looking around the stadium, like, ‘I wonder what the backup quarterback for the 49ers is up to.’”  The comedian continued, saying “it’s mostly white guys that are upset,” which he understands “because this country has always been great for white guys.”  “You absolutely should defend the National Anthem. If I was white, I’d always d ...
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Huffington Post article
Creed
Huffington Post - about 1 year
"Why would you pick a fighter's life if you didn't have to," asks the old, retired ex-boxer Rocky Balboa (Sylvester Stallone). He would know. The life, it ain't easy. Yet as he stares into the eyes of Apollo Creed's son Adonis (Michael B. Jordan), somewhere inside he knows the answer. His reservations and the young man's unbridled fighting spirit are the push-and-pull that drives this surprisingly compelling film that's a descendant of Rocky, the highest grossing film of 1976 and winner of an Oscar for Best Picture. 40 years later a pugilist's story is still a draw. (Photo courtesy of Warner Bros. Pictures) Sylvester Stallone and Michael B. Jordan co-star in Creed. Sylvester Stallone has written six Rocky films. The difference with this chapter is that the idea, story and script is the brainchild of the very bright and innovative writer/director Ryan Coogler, who won a bevy of awards for his directing debut Fruitvale Station. The creation of the character Adonis "Creed" Johns ...
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Huffington Post article
The Cosby Show Didn't Depict "Middle-Class" Life
Huffington Post - over 1 year
The upcoming piece in Ebony magazine's November issue, "Can 'The Cosby Show' Survive? Should It?" has set black America on fire with a much-needed discussion on the impact of the Cosby show, and the recent allegations of rape against Bill Cosby. The core analysis is a critique of the man Bill Cosby is off camera, and whether it should affect the historical legacy of the show he created. But, if you dig deeper the piece does an impactful analysis of the show itself, and what the creators had to do to present the nuclear black family as successful to America in the early eighties. The show walked the fine line laid out by a country that wanted to be post-racial only twenty years after Jim Crow signs had hung at local restaurants. Creators balanced the expectations of a post civil rights America's desire to become the visualization of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s dream, and how that fit inside of African-American reality. For eight seasons on NBC--five of which it was the coun ...
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Huffington Post article
Meera Gandhi Excells At Giving Back
Huffington Post - over 1 year
Ms. Meera Gandhi's open and generous heart can be felt by all those who encounter her, and she loves to give. Last month, I had the opportunity to meet Ms. Gandhi at her gorgeous Hudson Valley home where she was hosting an intimate party to celebrate the work of artist Kelli Bickman. Ms. Gandhi's warmth and kindness were immediately evident. She is a successful philanthropist, humanitarian and CEO and founder of the Giving Back Foundation. Ms. Gandhi's focus is on underserved children and women. In 2010, she launched the foundation to not only create a new generation of bright young leaders but also to assist with education, illness and poverty at a global level. She explains, "I believe that transformative education is the key to changing lives." On June 28, 2015 PBS aired a new series entitled "The New Faces of Philanthropy" and featured Ms. Gandhi and The Giving Back Foundation. She says the first step to giving back "is the need for mindfulness in our lives." In fact, the mott ...
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Huffington Post article
Raven-Symoné Rips Black Names, But Forgot About Her Own
Huffington Post - over 1 year
By JAMILAH LEMIEUX A person who is both legally and professionally known as "Raven-Symoné" used her enviable platform as a co-host on ABC's The View to rail against Black names. We could honestly stop talking right here, because the story--and the jokes--write themselves. Her name is Raven hyphen alternate spelling of "Simone," complete with what could be considered a gratuitous accent mark (it does not change the pronunciation of "Symone/Simone," it is there for decoration; she essentially has the equivalent of plastic furniture covers at the end of her name,) and yet she feels compelled to punch down at those who also have names that are also Black as a dice game at a church fish fry, but may not have hit the faux French mark as well as her own. Only a blindfolded person with no sense of smell being asked to hold a plate of meat and walk into a den full of dogs could match her lack of self-awareness. How dare you, Raven hyphen alternate spelling of "Simone?" Sitting ther ...
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Huffington Post article
Phylicia Rashad on directing 'Immediate Family' at Mark Taper Forum
LATimes - almost 2 years
Poet Vivian Ayers once told her daughter Phylicia Rashad that being an actress made her one of the "magic" people.
Article Link:
LATimes article
For LaTanya Richardson Jackson, a 'dream' role
San Francisco Chronicle - about 3 years
Richardson Jackson, who was last on Broadway in the Tony-winning 2009 revival of "Joe Turner's Come and Gone," was asked on Saturday to take over for Diahann Carroll in next month's Broadway revival of "A Raisin in the Sun." Director Kenny Leon, who asked her to step in, didn't even know she was in New York when he dialed her cell phone. Set in the late 1950s in a rundown South Side Chicago apartment, "A Raisin in the Sun" deals with the hopes and disappointments of a black family trying to find a better life in a white neighborhood. The original Broadway production in 1959 featured Sidney Poitier, Ruby Dee, Claudia McNeil and Diana Sands, all who reunited for a 1961 film adaptation. The last Broadway revival occurred in 2004, starring Diddy (Sean Combs), Phylicia Rashad, Sanaa Lathan and Audra McDonald.
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San Francisco Chronicle article
A Good Year for Stacy Keach, A Tribute to Juanita Moore
Huffington Post - about 3 years
"Jupiter enters Leo for a year -- a boon for theatrical types of all persuasions!" writes our smart astrologist friend Shelley Ackerman. So, you take heart, my friends in show business. • SPEAKING OF this possibly being a very good year, the great actor Stacy Keach certainly thinks it might be! In June, Stacy will play Falstaff in both parts of Shakespeare's "Henry IV" at the Shakespeare Theater in Washington DC. The kicker to this is Stacy played the same role 46 years ago. He says, "I might be wrong, but I think I may be a candidate for the Guinness Book of Records. When I played it back in 1968 in Central Park, I was 27. I received some very good reviews. Now I'm 72--reverse the numbers, but the role remains the same!" (Newsweek referred to Keach as a "Grand Young Man" in its review.) Stacy Keach is grand. I had a wonderful interview with him about a year ago. He is most famous for tough guy roles, but in real life he is adorably gentle, funny and smart. He's had ...
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Huffington Post article
Condola Rashad: A Fresh Face To The Classic 'Juliet'
NPR - over 3 years
The daughter of actress Phylicia Rashad stars opposite Orlando Bloom in a new Broadway production of Romeo and Juliet. Condola Rashad speaks with guest host Celeste Headlee about this new twist on the classic Shakespearean play. » E-Mail This     » Add to Del.icio.us
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NPR article
A Day In The Life Of Condola Rashad Of 'Romeo And Juliet'
Huffington Post - over 3 years
True, Condola Rashad has showbiz lineage — her mom and aunt are legendary theater and television actresses Phylicia Rashad and Debbie Allen and her father is former football star and sportscaster Ahmad Rashad — but she’s also worked hard at carving out a niche of her own. She made her theater debut in Lynn Nottage’s 2009 Pulitzer Prize winning drama Ruined and further created a splash on Broadway with her first two shows in Stick Fly (2012) and A Trip to Bountiful (2013), which garnered critical acclaim and Tony Award nominations.
Article Link:
Huffington Post article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Phylicia Rashād
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 2010
    Age 61
    In November 2010, Rashād starred in the Tyler Perry film For Colored Girls, based on the play For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Suicide When the Rainbow Is Enuf by Ntozake Shange.
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  • FIFTIES
  • 2008
    Age 59
    In February 2008, she appeared in the television adaptation of A Raisin in the Sun.
    More Details Hide Details She starred on Broadway as Big Mama in an all-African American production of Tennessee Williams's Pulitzer Prize-winning drama Cat on a Hot Tin Roof directed by her sister Debbie Allen. She appeared alongside stage veterans James Earl Jones (Big Daddy) and Anika Noni Rose (Maggie), as well as film actor Terrence Howard, who makes his Broadway debut as Brick. She will appear as Violet Weston, the drug-addicted matriarch of Tracy Lett's award-winning play, August: Osage County at the Music Box Theatre.
    She returned to the role in 2008, in the episode Christmas Joy.
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  • 2007
    Age 58
    In 2007 she appeared as Winnie Guster in the Psych episode Gus's Dad May Have Killed an Old Guy.
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    She played Kill Moves' affluent mother on Everybody Hates Chris on Sunday, December 9, 2007.
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    In 2007, Rashād made her directorial debut with the Seattle Repertory Theatre’s production of August Wilson’s Gem of the Ocean.
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  • 2002
    Age 53
    That year, Cosby asked Rashād to work on his animated television series Little Bill, in which the actress voiced Bill's mother, Brenda, until the show's end in 2002.
    More Details Hide Details She also played a role in the pre-show of the "Dinosaur" ride at Walt Disney World's Animal Kingdom theme park.
  • 2001
    Age 52
    The couple divorced in early 2001 but she kept the name Rashād.
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  • FORTIES
  • 1996
    Age 47
    When Cosby returned to TV comedy in 1996 with CBS's Cosby, he called on Rashād to play Ruth Lucas, his character's wife.
    More Details Hide Details The pilot episode had been shot with Telma Hopkins, but Cosby then fired the executive producer and replaced Hopkins with Rashād. The sitcom ran from 1996 to 2000.
  • THIRTIES
  • 1985
    Age 36
    They were married after he proposed to her during a pregame show for a nationally televised Thanksgiving Day football game between the New York Jets and the Detroit Lions on November 28, 1985.
    More Details Hide Details Their daughter, Condola Phyleia Rashād, was born on December 11, 1986 in New York City. Along with her son, William, Rashād also has three stepchildren (Ahmad's from a previous marriage): daughters Keva (born in 1970) and Maiysha (born in 1974), and son Ahmad Jr. (born in 1978).
    She married former NFL wide receiver and sportscaster Ahmad Rashād on December 14, 1985.
    More Details Hide Details It was a third marriage for both of them and she took his last name.
  • 1983
    Age 34
    Rashād received a career boost when she joined the cast of the ABC soap opera One Life to Live in 1983.
    More Details Hide Details She is best known for another television role, that of attorney Clair Huxtable on the NBC sitcom The Cosby Show. The show starred Bill Cosby as obstetrician Cliff Huxtable, and focused on their life with their five children.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1978
    Age 29
    Rashād then married Victor Willis (original lead singer of the Village People) in 1978. Their divorce was finalized in 1982.
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    In 1978, she released the album Josephine Superstar, a disco Concept album telling the life story of Josephine Baker.
    More Details Hide Details The album was mainly written and produced by Jacques Morali and Rashād's second husband Victor Willis, original lead singer and lyricist of the Village People. She met Willis while they were both cast in The Wiz. Other Broadway credits include August: Osage County, Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, Gem of the Ocean, Raisin in the Sun (2004 Tony Award for Best Actress in a Play/Drama Desk Award), Blue, Jelly's Last Jam, Into the Woods, and Ain't Supposed To Die A Natural Death. Off-Broadway credits include Lincoln Center’s productions of Cymbeline and Bernarda Alba (musical); Helen, The Story and Everybody's Ruby at the Public Theater; The Negro Ensemble Company productions of Puppet Play, Zooman and the Sign, Sons and Fathers of Sons, In an Upstate Motel, Weep Not For Me, and The Great Mac Daddy; Lincoln Center's production of Ed Bullins' The Duplex; and The Sirens at the Manhattan Theatre Club. In regional theatre, she performed as Euripedes' Medea and in Blues for an Alabama Sky at the Alliance Theatre in Atlanta, Georgia. Other regional theatres at which she has performed are the Arena Stage in Washington, D.C. and the Huntington Theatre in Boston.
  • 1972
    Age 23
    Rashād's first marriage, in 1972, was to dentist William Lancelot Bowles, Jr. They had one son, William Lancelot Bowles III, who was born the following year. The marriage ended in 1975.
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  • 1970
    Age 21
    Rashād studied at Howard University, graduating magna cum laude in 1970 with a Bachelor's degree in Fine Arts.
    More Details Hide Details Rashād first became notable on the stage with a string of Broadway credits, including Deena Jones in Dreamgirls (she was Sheryl Lee Ralph's understudy until she left the show in 1982 after Rashād was passed over as Ralph's full-time replacement) and playing a Munchkin in The Wiz.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1948
    Born
    Born on June 19, 1948.
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