Rainier Monaco
Prince of Monaco
Rainier Monaco
Biography
Rainier III, Prince of Monaco's personal information overview.
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News
News abour Rainier III, Prince of Monaco from around the web
Volusia County public records for May 12, 2011 - Daytona Beach News-Journal
Google News - almost 6 years
William D. Prince III, real property; Citimortgage Inc. v. Debra A. Kline, real property; Rashara Smith v. State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance, insurance claim; Daytona Beach Regency Association Inc. v. Charles E. Sullivan, timeshare foreclosure;
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Prince closing on purchase of Edwards Motors - Albany Herald On-line
Google News - almost 6 years
John B. Prince III met with attorneys Tuesday morning to finalize the Prince Automotive Group's purchase of Edwards Motors here. The local Buick and Cadillac franchises that had been under the Edwards Motors umbrella will officially become part of the
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Batting Cleanup at Bank of America
NYTimes - about 6 years
Charlotte, N.C. BRIAN MOYNIHAN isn't one to look back. And as the chief executive of Bank of America, he has plenty of reasons not to. His company is staggering under the weight of his predecessors' decisions, and each day seems to bring more bad news. More than 1.3 million of the bank's customers are behind on their home loans, all 50 state
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DEALBOOK ONLINE; STEPPING DOWN
NYTimes - about 6 years
After seven tumultuous years as head of Citigroup's government affairs group, Nicholas Calio is stepping down to become the chief lobbyist for the airline industry. Mr. Calio, who was a White House legislative adviser to both Bush presidencies, shaped Citigroup's political strategy as the bank came under harsh scrutiny from lawmakers for all that
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Subprime Claims Cost Citi $75 Million
NYTimes - over 6 years
Citigroup agreed on Thursday to pay $75 million to settle federal claims that it failed to disclose vast holdings of subprime mortgage investments that were deteriorating during the financial crisis and ultimately crippled the bank. The settlement centers on events in the fall of 2007, when Citigroup's reported losses started to cascade, eventually
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Citigroup's Annual Meeting Is More Relaxed After Big Quarterly Profit
NYTimes - almost 7 years
With Citigroup under siege last year, Richard D. Parsons, its chairman, told shareholders at the annual meeting that the bank skipped the coffee and doughnuts to save cash after three bailouts. This year, after posting a $4.4 billion first-quarter profit that was its best since the crisis erupted, the coffee was back. But what about the doughnuts?
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So Many Ways to Almost Say 'I'm Sorry'
NYTimes - almost 7 years
The parade of bankers called to account for the financial crisis continued last week when Kerry K. Killinger, head of Washington Mutual, the largest bank ever to fail, apologized, sort of, as have many before him. But he also said that his firm ''should have been given a chance.'' Here are some of those mea culpa moments. Angelo R. Mozilo
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EDITORIAL; Who's Not Sorry Now?
NYTimes - almost 7 years
''I'm sorry that the financial crisis has had such a devastating impact on our country. I'm sorry for the millions of people, average Americans, who have lost their homes. And I'm sorry that our management team, starting with me, like so many others, could not see the unprecedented market collapse that lay before us.'' -- Charles O. Prince III,
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Contrition, and Lack of It, at Citigroup Hearing
NYTimes - almost 7 years
WASHINGTON -- The two men who steered Citigroup into the eye of the financial storm offered a striking contrast on Thursday. Charles O. Prince III, Citigroup's former chairman and chief executive, abased himself before the federal panel investigating the causes of the crisis, apologizing repeatedly for the billions of dollars in losses at an
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DEALBOOK COLUMN; Now to Explain The Party Favors
NYTimes - almost 7 years
On Thursday, two of the biggest -- and among the most tarnished -- names on Wall Street will testify in front of the Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission in Washington: Charles O. Prince III, the former chairman and chief executive of Citigroup, and Robert E. Rubin, a former top adviser and director of the bank. On the watch of these men, Citigroup
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BOOKS OF THE TIMES; Panoramic Hindsight On Wall St. Disaster
NYTimes - almost 7 years
THE END OF WALL STREET By Roger Lowenstein 339 pages. The Penguin Press. $27.95. Roger Lowenstein's account of endemic financial collapse is bookended by anecdotes about Robert L. Rodriguez, an unusually cautious fund manager. The prologue of ''The End of Wall Street'' describes a dream Mr. Rodriguez had in February 2006. He saw himself in a
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Pandit Is Running Out of Time to Clean Up Citigroup
NYTimes - about 7 years
It is make or break time for Vikram S. Pandit. For the last two years, Mr. Pandit has tried, with mixed success, to clean up the financial mess that is Citigroup. But some of his employees and shareholders are starting to lose patience. After many billions of dollars in losses, Mr. Pandit must deliver profits in 2010, or risk losing his job as
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Sluggers and Bankers In the Strikeout Era
NYTimes - about 7 years
It seems fitting that in the same week that the mandarins of American finance were yanked to Capitol Hill to explain their roles in the global financial crisis, the baseball slugger Mark McGwire finally came clean about how he managed to crush so many monstrous home runs. A dozen years ago, Mr. McGwire was celebrated as a modern-day Babe Ruth,
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For Bankers, Saying 'Sorry' Has Its Perils
NYTimes - about 7 years
As America recovers from the worst financial crisis since the Depression, some of the nation's chief executives are offering that rarest of statements -- an apology. But often, their words are so carefully parsed, scrubbed by lawyers or picked over by public relations professionals that it is unclear just how much mea is in their culpa. The former
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Can Citigroup Carry Its Own Weight?
NYTimes - over 7 years
Correction Appended OVER the past 80 years, the United States government has engineered not one, not two, not three, but at least four rescues of the institution now known as Citigroup. In previous instances, the bank came back from the crisis and prospered. Will Citigroup rise again from its recent near-death experience? The answer to that
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CORRECTIONS
NYTimes - over 7 years
A chart with an article on Sept. 13, about whereabouts of Wall Street executives a year after the worst of the financial crisis, referred incorrectly to an activity of Charles O. Prince III, former Citigroup chief executive. Though a golfer, he does not play golf in Palm Beach, Fla., with C. Michael Armstrong, former head of Citigroup's audit
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TALKING BUSINESS; Incompetent? No, Just Not A Leader
NYTimes - over 7 years
Some people are born to be leaders. Hugh L. McColl Jr. is such a person. Starting in 1974, when he was 39, he became the president of a small southern bank called North Carolina National Bank. He then proceeded to build one of the great banking empires in American history. Buying bank after bank, he transformed his small institution into
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Rainier III, Prince of Monaco
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 2005
    Age 81
    He was buried on 15 April 2005, beside his wife, Princess Grace, at the Saint Nicholas Cathedral, the resting place of previous sovereign princes of Monaco and several of their wives, and the place where Prince Rainier and Princess Grace had been married in 1956.
    More Details Hide Details Because his death occurred shortly after that of Pope John Paul II, Rainier's death was overshadowed in the media. As a mark of respect, his family did not attend that year's Monaco Grand Prix. See also: List of titles of the Monegasque Crown
    On 31 March 2005, following consultation with the Crown Council of Monaco, the Palais Princier announced that Rainier's son, Hereditary Prince Albert, would take over the duties of his father as regent since Rainier was no longer able to exercise his royal functions.
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    On 7 March 2005, he was again hospitalized with a lung infection.
    More Details Hide Details Rainier was moved to the hospital's intensive care unit on 22 March. One day later, on 23 March, it was announced he was on a ventilator, suffering from renal and heart failure. On 26 March, the palace reported that despite intensive ongoing efforts to improve the prince's health, he was continuing to deteriorate; however, the following day, he was reported to be conscious, his heart and kidney conditions having stabilized. His prognosis remained "very reserved".
  • 2004
    Age 80
    In February 2004, he was hospitalized with a coronary lesion and a damaged blood vessel.
    More Details Hide Details In October he was again in hospital with a lung infection. In November of that year, Prince Albert appeared on CNN's Larry King Live and told Larry King that his father was fine, though he was suffering from bronchitis.
    He spent three weeks in hospital in January 2004 for what was described as general fatigue.
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  • 1999
    Age 75
    He underwent surgery in late 1999 and 2000, and was hospitalized in November 2002 for a chest infection.
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    The prestigious philatelic collectors club Club de Monte-Carlo de l'Élite de la Philatélie was established under his patronage in 1999; the club has its headquarters at the museum, with its membership restricted to institutions and one hundred prestigious collectors.
    More Details Hide Details Rainier organized exhibitions of rare and exceptional postage stamps and letters with the club's members. Throughout his reign, Rainier surveyed all the process of creation of Monaco stamps. He liked stamps printed in intaglio and the art of engravers Henri Cheffer and Czesław Słania. Rainier's car collection was opened to the public as the Monaco Top Cars Collection in Fontvieille. Prince Rainier smoked 60 cigarettes a day. In the last years of his life his health progressively declined.
  • FIFTIES
  • 1979
    Age 55
    In 1979, Prince Rainier made his acting debut alongside his wife Grace in a 33-minute independent film called Rearranged, produced in Monaco.
    More Details Hide Details According to co-star Edward Meeks, after premiering it in Monaco, Grace showed it to ABC TV executives in New York in 1982, who expressed interest if extra scenes were shot to make it an hour long. However, Grace died in a car crash caused by a stroke in 1982, making it impossible to expand the film for American release. Rainier then may have been romantically involved with his second cousin, Princess Ira von Fürstenberg, a former actress turned jewellery designer, who is also a Fiat heiress and the former sister-in-law of fashion designer Diane von Fürstenberg. Princess Ira, like him, is a great-grandchild of Lady Mary Victoria Hamilton, the Scottish-German wife of Prince Albert I of Monaco, though by Lady Mary's second marriage. After Grace's death, Rainier refused to remarry. Rainier established a postal museum in 1950: the Museum of Stamps and Coins, in Monaco's Fontvieille district by using the collections of the Monegasque princes Albert I and Louis II.
  • THIRTIES
  • 1962
    Age 38
    As Prince of Monaco, Rainier was also responsible for the principality's new constitution in 1962 which significantly reduced the power of the sovereign. (He suspended the previous Constitution in 1959, saying that it "has hindered the administrative and political life of the country.") The changes ended autocratic rule, placing power with the prince and a National Council of eighteen elected members. At the time of his death, he was the world's second longest-serving living head of state, ranking just below the King of Thailand, Bhumibol Adulyadej. After a year-long courtship described as containing "a good deal of rational appraisal on both sides" (The Times, 7 April 2005, page 59), Prince Rainier married Oscar-winning American actress Grace Kelly (1929–1982) in 1956.
    More Details Hide Details The ceremonies in Monaco were on 18 April 1956 (civil) and 19 April 1956 (religious). Their children are:
  • TWENTIES
  • 1949
    Age 25
    Rainier became the Sovereign Prince of Monaco on the death of Louis II on 9 May 1949.
    More Details Hide Details After ascending the throne, Rainier worked assiduously to recoup Monaco's lustre, which had become tarnished through neglect (especially financial) and scandal (his mother, Princess Charlotte, took a noted jewel thief known as René the Cane as her lover). According to numerous obituaries, the prince was faced upon his ascension with a treasury that was practically empty. The small nation's traditional gambling clientele, largely European aristocrats, found themselves with reduced funds after World War II. Other gambling centers had opened to compete with Monaco, many of them successfully. To compensate for this loss of income, Rainier decided to promote Monaco as a tax haven, commercial center, real-estate development opportunity, and international tourist attraction. The early years of his reign saw the overweening involvement of the Greek shipping tycoon Aristotle Onassis, who took control of the Société des Bains de Mer (SBM) and envisioned Monaco as solely a gambling resort. Prince Rainier regained control of SBM in 1964, effectively ensuring that his vision of Monaco would be implemented. In addition, the Societé Monégasque de Banques et de Métaux Précieux, a bank which held a significant amount of Monaco's capital, was bankrupted by its investments in a media company in 1955, leading to the resignation of Monaco's cabinet.
    Following his decommission from the French Army, he was promoted by the French government as a captain in April 1949 and a colonel in December 1954.
    More Details Hide Details In the 1940s and 1950s, Rainier had a ten-year relationship with the French film actress Gisèle Pascal, whom he had met while a student at Montpellier University, and the couple lived at Saint-Jean-Cap-Ferrat. Rainier's sister, Princess Antoinette, wishing her own son to ascend the throne, spread rumours that Pascal was infertile. The rumours combined with a snobbery over Pascal's family origins ultimately ended the relationship.
  • 1947
    Age 23
    He received the French Croix de Guerre with bronze star (representing a brigade level citation) and was given the rank of Chevalier in the French Legion of Honor in 1947.
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  • 1944
    Age 20
    In World War II Rainier joined the Free French Army in September 1944, and serving under General de Monsabert as a second lieutenant, and seeing action during the German counter-offensive in Alsace.
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    In 1944, upon his 21st birthday, Rainier's mother renounced her right to the Monegasque throne and Rainier became Prince Louis's direct heir.
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  • TEENAGE
  • 1939
    Age 15
    Rainier's early education was conducted in England, at the prestigious public schools of Summerfields in St Leonards-on-Sea, Sussex, and later at Stowe, in Buckinghamshire. After England, Rainier attended the Institut Le Rosey in Rolle and Gstaad, Switzerland from 1939, before continuing to the University of Montpellier in France, where he obtained a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1943, and finally to the Institut d'études politiques de Paris in Paris.
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  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1923
    Born
    Born on May 31, 1923.
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Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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