Mary, Harewood
British princess
Mary, Harewood
Princess Mary, Princess Royal and Countess of Harewood was a member of the British Royal Family; she was the third child and only daughter of King George V and Queen Mary. She was the sixth holder of the title of Princess Royal.
Biography
Mary, Princess Royal and Countess of Harewood's personal information overview.
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News
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The Pink Diamond: A Class of Its Own - The Epoch Times
Google News - over 5 years
(Courtesy of Argyle Diamond Mine) Argyle Pink Diamonds are the most exclusive gems in the world and, as such, are normally the reserved for the likes of Princess Mary of Denmark, Nicole Kidman and J. Lo, who still has her 6.5 karat pink diamond
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Princess Mary's kisses for her water babies - hellomagazine.com
Google News - over 5 years
30 AUGUST 2011 Before the world fell in love with the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, there was another charismatic royal couple that captured hearts. And like William and Kate a large part of Mary and Frederik of Denmark's appeal is that they are so
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Princess Mary visits Kenya's refugees - Sky News Australia
Google News - over 5 years
Crown Princess Mary has visited famine victims at the world's largest refugee camp in Kenya. Leaving her own children at home, she spent time with malnourished women and children at the Dadaab camp. Her visit aims to help raise awareness about the
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Photos of the Day: Aug. 26 - Wall Street Journal (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
UNDERWATER KISS: Crown Prince Frederik of Denmark, an experienced diver, greeted his wife, Princess Mary, through the glass of an aquarium at the North Sea Center in Hirtshals, Denmark, Thursday. (Zuma Press) POP STAR: Singer Kesha performed at the
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Prince Joachim and Princess Marie expecting a child in January - The Copenhagen Post
Google News - over 5 years
One year after the birth of Crown Prince Frederik's and Crown Princess Mary's twins, Prince Joachim will join his brother in the club of being the proud father of four. Joachim has two children with his first wife, Countess Alexandra - Prince Nikolai,
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Denmark's future heir starts school - state school - euronews
Google News - over 5 years
And five year old Prince Christian's parents – Crown Prince Frederik and Crown Princess Mary – have broken with royal tradition, sending their son to a state school. He is to attend Tranegaardsskolen, located just north of central Copenhagen
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George Lascelles, 88, Earl and Opera Writer
NYTimes - over 5 years
George Lascelles, the seventh Earl of Harewood, a member of the British royal family who was an internationally recognized writer on opera, died on July 11 at Harewood House, his family's home near Leeds. He was 88. A family spokesman announced the death, The Press Association, the British news service, reported. A first cousin of Queen Elizabeth
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Princess Mary of Denmark shows solidarity with Norway victims - hellomagazine.com
Google News - over 5 years
Dressed sombrely in black, Princess Mary of Denmark pays her respects to the victims of the island and bomb massacre that shook neighbouring Norway at the weekend. She joined her husband Crown Prince Frederik and mother-in-law Queen Margrethe,
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Day of remembrance for Norway's victims - The Copenhagen Post
Google News - over 5 years
Queen Margrethe, Crown Prince Frederik and Princess Mary, Prime Minister Lars Løkke Rasmussen and his wife Sølrun, government ministers and members of parliament will join the Norwegian ambassador, Jørg Willy Bronebakk, and representatives of Norway's
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George Lascelles, Lord Harewood, Dies at 88; Wrote Opera Reference - New York Times
Google News - over 5 years
His mother, Princess Mary — formally Victoria Alexandra Alice Mary Windsor, Princess Royal of the United Kingdom — was the king's only daughter. His father, Viscount Lascelles, became the sixth Earl of Harewood in 1929. At his birth, baby George was
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Princess Mary believed to be visiting Australia later this year - Herald Sun
Google News - over 5 years
Princess Mary with Prince Vincent, Princess Isabella, Prince Christian, and Crown Prince Frederik with Princess Josephine. Picture: Snapper Source: Supplied DANISH Crown Princess Mary is set to introduce her expanded family to Melbourne later this year
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No style icon, but a right royal legend - Sydney Morning Herald
Google News - over 5 years
His mother was Princess Mary, the Princess Royal - the only daughter of King George V and Queen Mary. His uncles included the abdicating Edward VIII and the speech-impaired George VI. At the time of his birth in 1923, George Harewood was sixth in line
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The Earl of Harewood - Telegraph.co.uk
Google News - over 5 years
George Henry Hubert Lascelles was born at Chesterfield House, London, on February 7 1923, the eldest son of Viscount Lascelles, heir to the earldom of Harewood, and of Princess Mary, King George V's only daughter, who was declared Princess Royal in ... -
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Make colour do the work for you - Sydney Morning Herald
Google News - over 5 years
Princess Mary keeps things simple at Prince Albert's wedding. Photo: Snapper Media PIPPA who? Carole who? Who cares? They're so last royal wedding. Move over Windsors, now it's all about the recent Grimaldi nuptials. I was fascinated when analysing the
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Mary, Princess Royal and Countess of Harewood
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  • 1965
    On 28 March 1965 the Princess Royal suffered a fatal heart attack during a walk with her elder son, Lord Harewood, and his children in the grounds of the Harewood House estate.
    More Details Hide Details She was 67 years old. She was buried at Harewood after a private family funeral at York Minster. Six British monarchs reigned during Princess Mary's lifetime: Queen Victoria (her great-grandmother), Edward VII (her grandfather), George V (her father), Edward VIII and George VI (her brothers) and Elizabeth II (her niece). At the time of her death, Princess Mary's full style was: Her Royal Highness The Princess Victoria Alexandra Alice Mary, Princess Royal and Countess of Harewood, Companion of the Imperial Order of the Crown of India, Dame Grand Cross of the Royal Victorian Order, Dame Grand Cross of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire, Dame Grand Cross of the Order of St. John of Jerusalem, Member (First Class) of the Royal Red Cross. Born a great-granddaughter of Queen Victoria, Mary was styled Her Highness Princess Mary of York from birth (this was later changed to Her Royal Highness by Queen Victoria). When Queen Victoria died, for a short time she was known as HRH Princess Mary of Cornwall and York (as her father was now the eldest living son of the monarch and thus Duke of Cornwall as well as Duke of York) and then HRH Princess Mary of Wales when her father was created Prince of Wales. Finally, upon her father's accession as King she was styled and titled HRH The Princess Mary. After her marriage, her Harewood titles were affixed after her royal titles.
    The Princess Royal also made history that same month of March 1965, when she visited her brother, the Duke of Windsor (formerly King Edward VIII) at the London Clinic, where he was recovering from recent eye surgery.
    More Details Hide Details The Princess also met her brother's wife, the Duchess of Windsor (at that time, married to the Duke for more than 28 years), one of the Duchess' few meetings with her husband's immediate family up to that time. A few days later, the Queen also visited the Duke of Windsor, and she accepted the presence of the Duchess, who curtsied to her — the first time that a member of the Royal Family had officially received the Duke's wife.
  • 1953
    She attended the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II in June 1953 and later represented the Queen at the independence celebrations of Trinidad and Tobago in 1962, and Zambia in 1964.
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  • 1951
    She became the chancellor of the University of Leeds in 1951, and continued to carry out official duties at home and abroad.
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  • 1947
    After her husband's death in 1947, the Princess Royal lived at Harewood House with her elder son and his family.
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    Later, in November 1947, she allegedly declined to attend the wedding of her niece, The Princess Elizabeth, to Lieutenant Philip Mountbatten to protest the fact that the Duke of Windsor had not been invited.
    More Details Hide Details She gave ill health as the official reason for her non-attendance. The Duke of Windsor was however invited to the weddings of Princess Margaret and Princess Alexandra of Kent, his nieces, but out of bitterness he refused to attend. At the outbreak of World War II, the Princess Royal became chief controller and later controller commandant of the Auxiliary Territorial Service (ATS, renamed the Women's Royal Army Corps in 1949). In that capacity she travelled Britain visiting its units, as well as wartime canteens and other welfare organisations. On the death of her younger brother, the Duke of Kent, she became the president of Papworth. The Princess Royal became air chief commandant of Princess Mary's Royal Air Force Nursing Service in 1950 and received the honorary rank of general in the British Army in 1956. Also, in 1949, the 10th Gurkha Rifles were renamed the 10th Princess Mary's Own Gurkha Rifles in her honour.
  • 1932
    On 1 January 1932, George V declared that his only daughter should bear the title Princess Royal, succeeding her aunt Princess Louise, Duchess of Fife who had died a year before.
    More Details Hide Details The Princess Royal was particularly close to her eldest brother, the Prince of Wales, who subsequently became Edward VIII (who was known as David to his family). After the abdication crisis, she and her husband went to stay with the former Edward VIII, by then created Duke of Windsor, at Enzenfeld Castle near Vienna.
  • 1929
    On 6 October 1929, Lord Lascelles, who had been created a Knight of the Garter upon his marriage, succeeded his father as 6th Earl of Harewood, Viscount Lascelles, and Baron Harewood.
    More Details Hide Details The couple's elder son assumed the courtesy title of Viscount Lascelles.
  • 1923
    On 25 March 1923, her first son George was christened at St Mary's Church, which adjoins Goldsborough Hall by Cosmo Lang, Archbishop of York.
    More Details Hide Details The service was attended by King George V and Queen Mary. After becoming the Countess of Harewood on the death of her father-in-law, Princess Mary moved to Harewood House and took a keen interest in the interior decoration and renovation of the Lascelles family's seat. In farming pursuits, Princess Mary also became an expert in cattle breeding.
  • 1922
    On 28 February 1922, Princess Mary married Viscount Lascelles (9 September 1882 – 23 May 1947), the elder son of the then Earl of Harewood, and Lady Florence Bridgeman, daughter of Orlando Bridgeman, 3rd Earl of Bradford of Weston Park.
    More Details Hide Details Their wedding at Westminster Abbey was the first royal occasion in which the future Queen Elizabeth (wife of King George VI and mother of Queen Elizabeth II), a friend of Princess Mary and one of the bridesmaids, participated. The Princess was 24, Lord Lascelles was 39. Princess Mary and Lord Lascelles had two sons: It was later reported that she did not want to marry Lord Lascelles, that her parents forced her into an arranged marriage, and that Lascelles proposed to her after a wager at his club. Her brother, the Prince of Wales, later King Edward VIII, to whom she was very close, was against the marriage because he did not want his sister to marry someone whom she did not love. Her elder son, the Earl of Harewood, however, writes about his parents' marriage in his memoirs The Tongs and the Bones and challenges these widespread rumours that the marriage was an unhappy one. He says that "they got on well together and had a lot of friends and interests in common".
  • 1920
    She became honorary president of the British Girl Guide Association in 1920, a position she held until her death. It was reported in July 2013 that British Pathe had discovered newsreel film from 1927 in which the ancestors of Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge are, as Lord Mayors of Leeds, playing host to Princess Mary at the Young Women's Christian Association in Hunslet, Leeds; both Sir Charles Lupton and his brother Hugh Lupton, were the uncles of Olive Middleton - the Duchess's great grandmother.
    More Details Hide Details In 1926, Princess Mary became the commandant-in-chief of the British Red Cross Detachments. She was patron of the Leeds Triennial Musical Festival for many years. By the 1940s, Princess Mary was attending the opening nights and many of the festival's performances, as was her son, George, and his wife, the Countess of Harewood, née Marion Stein, a former concert pianist. George was a noted music critic whose career included the role of artistic director of the Leeds Triennial Musical Festival.
  • 1918
    In June 1918, following an announcement in The Gentlewoman, she began a nursing course at the Great Ormond Street Hospital, working two days a week in the Alexandra Ward.
    More Details Hide Details Princess Mary's public duties reflected her concerns with nursing, the Girl Guide movement, and the Women's Services. In the period leading up to her marriage, girls and women in the British Empire called Mary and its variants (including Marie, May and Miriam) banded together to form "The Marys of the Empire," and donated money toward a wedding present. This fund she presented to the Girl Guides Association for the purchase of Foxlease, and following the exhibition of her wedding presents, she also contributed half the proceeds to the same cause, for upkeep, a total of £10,000, which enabled the project to go ahead.
  • 1914
    During World War I, Princess Mary visited hospitals and welfare organizations with her mother; assisting with projects to give comfort to British servicemen and assistance to their families. One of these projects was Princess Mary's Christmas Gift Fund, through which £100,000 worth of gifts was sent to all British soldiers and sailors for Christmas, 1914.
    More Details Hide Details This initiative was revived in 2005 by the charity uk4u-Thanks! She took an active role in promoting the Girl Guide movement, the VADs, and the Land Girls.
  • 1911
    Her first state appearance was at the coronation of her parents at Westminster Abbey on 22 June 1911.
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  • 1897
    Her baptism took place at St Mary Magdalene's Church near Sandringham on 7 June 1897 by William Dalrymple Maclagan, Archbishop of York.
    More Details Hide Details Her godparents were: The Queen (her great-grandmother); the King of the Hellenes (her great-uncle); the Dowager Empress of Russia (her paternal great-aunt); the Prince and Princess of Wales (her paternal grandparents); the Duchess of Teck (her maternal grandmother); Princess Victoria of Wales (her paternal aunt); and Prince Francis of Teck (her maternal uncle). Princess Mary was educated by governesses, but shared some lessons with her brothers, Prince Edward (later Edward VIII), Prince Albert (later George VI), and Prince Henry (later Duke of Gloucester, whose birth was the first of many that saw her superseded in the line of succession). She became fluent in German and French and developed a lifelong interest in horses and horse racing. Princess Mary and her husband Lord Harewood regularly rode with the Bramham Moor Hunt where he was Master of the Hunt.
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