Queen Mother
Queen-Empress
Queen Mother
Elizabeth Angela Marguerite Bowes-Lyon was the queen consort of King George VI from 1936 until his death in 1952, after which she was known as Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother, to avoid confusion with her daughter, Queen Elizabeth II. She was the last queen consort of Ireland and empress consort of India.
Biography
Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother's personal information overview.
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Un haut lieu de l'Histoire et de la petite histoire - Sud Ouest
Google News - over 5 years
Au cours de la deuxième moitié du XXe siècle, le château de Saint-Brice a connu de beaux événements comme le séjour de la reine mère d'Angleterre - Lady Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon - en 1980, ou encore le tournage en 1968 du film de Michel Deville,
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The King Maker by Geordie Greig - review - Evening Standard
Google News - over 5 years
Greig rightly states that his grandfather was the prince's "constant guide and adviser" but also his "cupid" during this heady period before the prince met Lady Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon (later the Queen Mother). Greig describes the contrasting worlds of
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Early resident had English ties - Glendale News Press
Google News - over 5 years
“Spencer Robinson shared ancestry with Diana Spencer, Princess of Wales and with Winston Spencer Churchill and also with Queen Elizabeth II, by way of her mother Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon,” Hunt said. Robinson's Spencer ancestors left England for
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Kartka z kalendarza: 4 sierpnia - Televizja Master
Google News - over 5 years
Urodzili się 4 sierpnia: 1900 - Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon, królowa Wielkiej Brytanii, żona Jerzego VI, matka Elżbiety II. 1901 – Louis Armstrong, amerykański trębacz i wokalista jazzowy. 1904 - Witold Gombrowicz, polski pisarz
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Joan's World: World War II holdouts - San Jose Mercury News
Google News - over 5 years
Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon started the practice when she laid her bouquet on the tomb as she entered the Abbey to marry the future King George VI. It was done as a tribute to her brother, Fergus, who was killed at the Battle of Loos in 1915
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More Hidden Royal Incest: Princess Diana's Mother - Wire Service Canada (press release)
Google News - over 5 years
Bertie married Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon (a distant cousin but instead possibly a secret direct descendant of Queen Victoria's, and therefore a first or second cousin to Wallis, also with a very round face but sweetly innocent small features,
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'God save the gin' - La Vanguardia
Google News - over 5 years
No es que la actriz británica asumiera un papel extraño –por otra parte frecuentes en su filmografía– ni difícil de etiquetar: era Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon, que cuando se casó pasó a ser duquesa de York, después reina –esposa del rey Jorge VI de
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Eroe (quasi) per caso - Paperblog
Google News - over 5 years
“La madre della regina, Sua Altezza Reale, la duchessa di York Lady Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon, mi chiese 30 anni fa di aspettare prima di fare il film, perché il ricordo di quegli eventi era ancora troppo doloroso. Ho capito allora che la storia era ancora
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Andrea Riseborough for James McAvoy film 'Punch'? - Digital Spy
Google News - over 5 years
The Tudors actress Natalie Dormer also stars in the movie as Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon, mother to Queen Elizabeth II. Riseborough has also been cast in Joe Strong's adaptation of Tolstoy's Anna Karenina. Welcome to the Punch is currently in pre-production
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The day the Queen did a conga into the Palace... then sang until 2am: An ... - Daily Mail
Google News - over 5 years
There were many other, more light-hearted family occasions, when my aunt, the Duchess of York [the future Queen Mother, who was born Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon, the sister of the author's mother, Lady Mary Bowes-Lyon] and her husband, with the two Princesses
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The King's smash! George VI's other mentor who played with the stammerer at ... - Daily Mail
Google News - over 5 years
The elder man, acting as Bertie's private secretary in 1922, also persuaded him to ask a third time for the hand of Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon – who had refused his proposal twice – and she finally accepted. 'Wherever Bertie went, Louis was the shadow giving
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Los retos de un Rey - La Prensa Gráfica
Google News - over 5 years
Al lado del rey siempre se mantuvo su esposa, Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon, interpretado por Helena Bonham Carter, quien fue pieza clave para que superara su defecto. Firth opina de su personaje: “Creo que su timidez junto con que fuese tartamudo se
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Marea Britanie: Prinţul consort Philip împlineşte astăzi 90 de ani - Evenimentul Zilei
Google News - over 5 years
O posibilă căsătorie între cei doi nu este la început o idee luată în consideraţie de părinţii tinerei, regele George al VI-lea şi soţia acestuia, Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon. Tânărul îndrăgostit este falit, are un caracter brutal deja cunoscut şi îi lipsesc
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Is Kate Middleton really a Wearside lass? - Sunderland Echo
Google News - almost 6 years
... have been the land and coal-owning Bowes-Lyon family,” she said. “For it was from this family that Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon, Her Majesty the Queen Mother and Prince William's great-grandmother, originated. We should all be proud of our mining heritage.”
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HOW MONET MADE AN IMPRESSION ON THE QUEEN MOTHER - Express.co.uk
Google News - almost 6 years
The former Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon started seriously collecting art after her marriage to George VI, buying a portrait of George Bernard Shaw by Augustus John. During her lifetime she amassed 300 paintings, 550 watercolours and drawings and 350 prints
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Family silver back at Glamis Castle after nearly 100 years away - Scotland Courier
Google News - almost 6 years
Its existence was drawn to the attention of the Queen Mother, born Lady Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon, at a regimental dinner in Berlin she attended in 1992 in her role as colonel-in-chief of the Irish Guards. Although Mr Bennett and his wife Roswitha were
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Cannes 2011: Madonna pulls her King Edward VIII and Wallace Simpson movie out - Daily Mail
Google News - almost 6 years
Bafta winner James Fox plays King George V, Natalie Dormer is the young Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon while Laurence Fox plays Bertie, Edward's younger brother and the future King George VI. Madonna's 14-year-old daughter Lourdes has a cameo role
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Elizabeth II becomes second-longest reigning British monarch - Mangalorean.com
Google News - almost 6 years
Elizabeth II - full name Elizabeth Alexandra Mary - was born on April 21, 1926, to King George VI and Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon. She was educated privately at home. Her father, George VI, became the British king in 1936. In 1947, Elizabeth married Prince
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother
    THIRTIES
  • 2002
    She was portrayed in the 2002 television film Bertie and Elizabeth by Juliet Aubrey, the 2006 film The Queen by Sylvia Syms and the 2010 film The King's Speech by Helena Bonham Carter, who was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress and won a BAFTA Award for Best Actress in a Supporting Role for her portrayal.
    More Details Hide Details She was also played by Natalie Dormer in the film W.E., directed by Madonna and by Olivia Colman in the 2012 film Hyde Park on Hudson, which featured Elizabeth and Albert's visit to President Roosevelt's estate. The Cunard White Star Line's RMS Queen Elizabeth was named after her. She launched the ship on 27 September 1938 in Clydebank, Scotland. Supposedly, the liner started to slide into the water before Elizabeth could officially launch her, and acting sharply, she managed to smash a bottle of Australian red over the liner's bow just before it slid out of reach. In 1954, Queen Elizabeth sailed to New York on her namesake. A statue of Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother by sculptor Philip Jackson at the George VI Memorial, off The Mall, London, was unveiled on 24 February 2009. In March 2011, her eclectic musical taste was revealed when details of her small record collection kept at the Castle of Mey were made public. Her records included ska, local folk, Scottish reels and the musicals Oklahoma! and The King and I, and artists such as yodeller Montana Slim, Tony Hancock, The Goons and Noël Coward.
    On 5 March 2002, she was present at the luncheon of the annual lawn party of the Eton Beagles, and watched the Cheltenham Races on television; however, her health began to deteriorate precipitately during her last weeks after retreating to Royal Lodge for the final time.
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    On 13 February 2002, the Queen Mother fell and cut her arm in her sitting room at Sandringham House; an ambulance and doctor were called, and the wound was dressed.
    More Details Hide Details She was still determined to attend Margaret's funeral at St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle, two days later on the Friday of that week, even though the Queen and the rest of the royal family were concerned about the journey the Queen Mother would face to get from Norfolk to Windsor; she was also rumoured to be hardly eating. Nevertheless, she flew to Windsor by helicopter, and so that no photographs of her in a wheelchair could be taken—she insisted that she be shielded from the press—she travelled to the service in a people carrier with blacked–out windows, which had been previously used by Margaret.
  • 2001
    In December 2001, aged 101, she fractured her pelvis in a fall.
    More Details Hide Details Even so, she insisted on standing for the National Anthem during the memorial service for her husband on 6 February the following year. Just three days later, her second daughter Princess Margaret died.
    Her final public engagements included planting a cross at the Field of Remembrance on 8 November 2001; a reception at the Guildhall, London, for the reformation of the 600 Squadron, Royal Auxiliary Air Force on 15 November; and attending the re-commissioning of on 22 November.
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    On 1 August 2001, she had a blood transfusion for anaemia after suffering from mild heat exhaustion, though she was well enough to make her traditional appearance outside Clarence House three days later to celebrate her 101st birthday.
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  • 2000
    In November 2000, she broke her collarbone in a fall that kept her recuperating at home over Christmas and the New Year.
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  • TWENTIES
  • 1998
    In 1998, her left hip was replaced after it was broken when she slipped and fell during a visit to Sandringham stables.
    More Details Hide Details Her 100th birthday was celebrated in a number of ways: a parade that celebrated the highlights of her life included contributions from Norman Wisdom and John Mills; her image appeared on a special commemorative £20 note issued by the Royal Bank of Scotland; and she attended a lunch at the Guildhall, London, at which George Carey, the Archbishop of Canterbury, accidentally attempted to drink her glass of wine. Her quick admonition of "That's mine!" caused widespread amusement.
  • 1995
    In 1995, she attended events commemorating the end of the war fifty years before, and had two operations: one to remove a cataract in her left eye, and one to replace her right hip.
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  • 1990
    In her later years, the Queen Mother became known for her longevity. Her 90th birthday—4 August 1990—was celebrated by a parade on 27 June that involved many of the 300 organisations of which she was patron.
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  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1976
    Between 1976 and 1984, she made annual summer visits to France, which were among 22 private trips to continental Europe between 1963 and 1992.
    More Details Hide Details Queen Elizabeth—known for her personal and public charm—was one of the most popular members of the royal family. Her signature dress of large upturned hat with netting and dresses with draped panels of fabric became a distinctive personal style.
  • 1975
    In 1975, she visited Iran at the invitation of Shah Mohammad Reza Pahlavi.
    More Details Hide Details The British ambassador and his wife, Anthony and Sheila Parsons, noted how the Iranians were bemused by her habit of speaking to everyone regardless of status or importance, and hoped the Shah's entourage would learn from the visit to pay more attention to ordinary people. Four years later, the Shah was deposed.
  • OTHER
  • 1966
    In December 1966, she underwent an operation to remove a tumour after she was diagnosed with colon cancer.
    More Details Hide Details Contrary to rumours, she did not have a colostomy. In 1982, she was rushed to hospital when a fish bone became stuck in her throat, and had an operation to remove it. Being a keen angler, she calmly joked afterwards, "The salmon have got their own back." Similar incidents occurred at Balmoral in August 1986, when she was taken to Aberdeen Royal Infirmary but no operation was needed, and May 1993, when she was admitted to the Infirmary for surgery under general anaesthetic. In 1984, she had a second operation for cancer, when a lump was removed from her breast, and a second gastric obstruction in 1986 cleared without the need for an operation, but she was hospitalised overnight.
  • 1964
    In February 1964, she had an emergency appendectomy, which led to the postponement of a planned tour of Australia, New Zealand and Fiji until 1966.
    More Details Hide Details She recuperated during a Caribbean cruise aboard the royal yacht, Britannia.
  • 1957
    On her return to the region in 1957, she was inaugurated as the College's President, and attended other events that were deliberately designed to be multi-racial.
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  • 1953
    During her daughter's extensive tour of the Commonwealth over 1953–54, Elizabeth acted as a Counsellor of State and looked after her grandchildren, Charles and Anne.
    More Details Hide Details She oversaw the restoration of the remote Castle of Mey, in Caithness on the north coast of Scotland, which she used to "get away from everything" for three weeks in August and ten days in October each year. She developed her interest in horse racing, particularly steeplechasing, which had been inspired by the amateur jockey Lord Mildmay in 1949. She owned the winners of approximately 500 races. Her distinctive colours of blue with buff stripes were carried by horses such as Special Cargo, the winner of the 1984 Whitbread Gold Cup, and Devon Loch, which spectacularly halted just short of the winning post at the 1956 Grand National and whose jockey Dick Francis later had a successful career as the writer of racing-themed detective stories. Peter Cazalet was her trainer for over 20 years. Although (contrary to rumour) she never placed bets, she did have the racing commentaries piped direct to her London residence, Clarence House, so she could follow the races. As an art collector, she purchased works by Claude Monet, Augustus John and Peter Carl Fabergé, among others.
    In July 1953, she undertook her first overseas visit since the funeral when she visited the Federation of Rhodesia and Nyasaland with Princess Margaret.
    More Details Hide Details She laid the foundation stone of the University College of Rhodesia and Nyasaland – the current University of Zimbabwe.
  • 1952
    After a lung resection, he appeared to recover, but the delayed trip to Australia and New Zealand was altered so that Princess Elizabeth and her husband, the Duke of Edinburgh, went in the King and Queen's place, in January 1952.
    More Details Hide Details The King died while Princess Elizabeth and the Duke were in Kenya en route to the southern hemisphere, and they returned immediately to London as the new Queen and consort. They would not finally visit Australia and New Zealand until 1954. King George VI died in his sleep on 6 February 1952. Elizabeth began to be styled as Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother because the normal style for the widow of a king, "Queen Elizabeth", would have been too similar to the style of her elder daughter, now Queen Elizabeth II. Popularly, she became the "Queen Mother" or the "Queen Mum". She was devastated by the King's death and retired to Scotland. However, after a meeting with the Prime Minister, Winston Churchill, she broke her retirement and resumed her public duties. Eventually she became just as busy as Queen Mother as she had been as Queen.
  • 1951
    In summer 1951, Queen Elizabeth and her daughters fulfilled the King's public engagements in his place.
    More Details Hide Details In September, he was diagnosed with lung cancer.
    After six years in office, Attlee was defeated in the 1951 British general election and Churchill returned to power.
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  • 1947
    During the 1947 royal tour of South Africa, Elizabeth's serene public behaviour was broken, exceptionally, when she rose from the royal car to strike an admirer with her umbrella because she had mistaken his enthusiasm for hostility.
    More Details Hide Details The 1948 royal tour of Australia and New Zealand was postponed because of the King's declining health. In March 1949, he had a successful operation to improve the circulation in his right leg.
    Elizabeth's political views were rarely disclosed, but a letter she wrote in 1947 described Attlee's "high hopes of a socialist heaven on earth" as fading and presumably describes those who voted for him as "poor people, so many half-educated and bemused.
    More Details Hide Details I do love them." Woodrow Wyatt thought her "much more pro-Conservative" than other members of the royal family, but she later told him, "I like the dear old Labour Party." She also told the Duchess of Grafton, "I love communists".
  • 1939
    In June 1939, Elizabeth and her husband toured Canada from coast to coast and back, and visited the United States, spending time with President Roosevelt at the White House and his Hudson Valley estate.
    More Details Hide Details U.S. First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt said that Elizabeth was "perfect as a Queen, gracious, informed, saying the right thing & kind but a little self-consciously regal". The tour was designed to bolster trans-Atlantic support in the event of war, and to affirm Canada's status as an independent kingdom sharing with Britain the same person as monarch. According to an often-told story, during one of the earliest of the royal couple's repeated encounters with the crowds, a Boer War veteran asked Elizabeth, "Are you Scots or are you English?" She replied, "I am a Canadian!" Their reception by the Canadian and U.S. public was extremely enthusiastic, and largely dissipated any residual feeling that George and Elizabeth were a lesser substitute for Edward. Elizabeth told Canadian Prime Minister William Lyon Mackenzie King, "that tour made us", and she returned to Canada frequently both on official tours and privately.
  • 1937
    George VI and Elizabeth were crowned King and Queen of Great Britain, Ireland and the British Dominions, and Emperor and Empress of India on 12 May 1937, the date already nominated for the coronation of Edward VIII.
    More Details Hide Details Elizabeth's crown was made of platinum and was set with the Koh-i-Noor diamond. Edward and Simpson married and became the Duke and Duchess of Windsor, but while Edward was a Royal Highness, George VI withheld the style from the Duchess, a decision that Elizabeth supported. Elizabeth was later quoted as referring to the Duchess as "that woman", and the Duchess referred to Elizabeth as "Cookie", because of her supposed resemblance to a fat Scots cook. Claims that Elizabeth remained embittered towards the Duchess were denied by her close friends; the Duke of Grafton wrote that she "never said anything nasty about the Duchess of Windsor, except to say she really hadn't got a clue what she was dealing with." In summer 1938, a state visit to France by the King and Queen was postponed for three weeks because of the death of the Queen's mother, Lady Strathmore. In two weeks, Norman Hartnell created an all-white trousseau for the Queen, who could not wear colours as she was still in mourning. The visit was designed to bolster Anglo-French solidarity in the face of aggression from Nazi Germany. The French press praised the demeanour and charm of the royal couple during the delayed but successful visit, augmented by Hartnell's wardrobe.
  • 1927
    Albert and Elizabeth, without their child, travelled to Australia to open Parliament House in Canberra in 1927.
    More Details Hide Details She was, in her own words, "very miserable at leaving the baby". Their journey by sea took them via Jamaica, the Panama Canal and the Pacific; Elizabeth fretted constantly over her baby back in Britain, but their journey was a public relations success. She charmed the public in Fiji when shaking hands with a long line of official guests, as a stray dog walked in on the ceremony and she shook its paw as well. In New Zealand she fell ill with a cold, and missed some engagements, but enjoyed the local fishing in the Bay of Islands accompanied by Australian sports fisherman Harry Andreas. On the return journey, via Mauritius, the Suez Canal, Malta and Gibraltar, their transport,, caught fire and they prepared to abandon ship before the fire was brought under control. On 20 January 1936, King George V died and Albert's brother, Edward, Prince of Wales, became King Edward VIII. George had expressed private reservations about his successor, saying, "I pray God that my eldest son will never marry and that nothing will come between Bertie and Lilibet and the throne."
  • 1926
    In 1926, the couple had their first child, Princess Elizabeth – "Lilibet" to the family – who would later become Queen Elizabeth II.
    More Details Hide Details Another daughter, Princess Margaret Rose, was born four years later.
  • 1925
    Albert had a stammer, which affected his ability to deliver speeches, and after October 1925, Elizabeth assisted in helping him through the therapy devised by Lionel Logue, an episode portrayed in the 2010 film The King's Speech.
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  • 1924
    After a successful visit to Northern Ireland in July 1924, the Labour government agreed that Albert and Elizabeth could tour East Africa from December 1924 to April 1925.
    More Details Hide Details The Labour government was defeated by the Conservatives in a general election in November (which Elizabeth described as "marvellous" to her mother) and the Governor-General of Anglo-Egyptian Sudan, Sir Lee Stack, was assassinated three weeks later. Despite this, the tour went ahead, and they visited Aden, Kenya, Uganda, and Sudan, but Egypt was avoided because of political tensions.
  • 1923
    They married on 26 April 1923, at Westminster Abbey.
    More Details Hide Details Unexpectedly, Elizabeth laid her bouquet at the Tomb of the Unknown Warrior on her way into the Abbey, in memory of her brother Fergus. Elizabeth became styled Her Royal Highness The Duchess of York. Following a wedding breakfast at Buckingham Palace prepared by chef Gabriel Tschumi, the new Duchess and her husband honeymooned at Polesden Lacey, a manor house in Surrey, and then went to Scotland, where she caught "unromantic" whooping cough.
    Eventually, in January 1923, Elizabeth agreed to marry Albert, despite her misgivings about royal life.
    More Details Hide Details Albert's freedom in choosing Elizabeth, not a member of a royal family, though the daughter of a peer, was considered a gesture in favour of political modernisation; previously, princes were expected to marry princesses from other royal families. They selected a platinum engagement ring featuring a Kashmir sapphire with two diamonds adorning its sides.
    She came to prominence in 1923 when she married Albert, Duke of York, the second son of King George V and Queen Mary.
    More Details Hide Details The couple and their daughters embodied traditional ideas of family and public service. She undertook a variety of public engagements and became known as the "Smiling Duchess" because of her consistent public expression. In 1936, her husband unexpectedly became King when his brother, Edward VIII, abdicated in order to marry the American divorcée Wallis Simpson. As Queen, Elizabeth accompanied her husband on diplomatic tours to France and North America before the start of World War II. During the war, her seemingly indomitable spirit provided moral support to the British public. In recognition of her role as an asset to British interests, Adolf Hitler described her as "the most dangerous woman in Europe". After the war, her husband's health deteriorated and she was widowed at the age of 51. On the death of her mother-in-law, Queen Mary, in 1953 and with the former King Edward VIII living abroad and her elder daughter, the new Queen, aged 26, Elizabeth became the senior member of the British Royal Family and assumed a position as family matriarch. In her later years, she was a consistently popular member of the family, even when other members were suffering from low levels of public approval. She continued an active public life until just a few months before her death at the age of 101, seven weeks after the death of her younger daughter, Princess Margaret.
  • 1922
    In February 1922, Elizabeth was a bridesmaid at the wedding of Albert's sister, Princess Mary, to Viscount Lascelles.
    More Details Hide Details The following month, Albert proposed again, but she refused him once more.
  • 1921
    Prince Albert, Duke of York – "Bertie" to the family – was the second son of King George V. He initially proposed to Elizabeth in 1921, but she turned him down, being "afraid never, never again to be free to think, speak and act as I feel I really ought to".
    More Details Hide Details When he declared he would marry no other, his mother, Queen Mary, visited Glamis to see for herself the girl who had stolen her son's heart. She became convinced that Elizabeth was "the one girl who could make Bertie happy", but nevertheless refused to interfere. At the same time, Elizabeth was courted by James Stuart, Albert's equerry, until he left the Prince's service for a better-paid job in the American oil business.
  • 1916
    She was particularly instrumental in organising the rescue of the castle's contents during a serious fire on 16 September 1916.
    More Details Hide Details One of the soldiers she treated wrote in her autograph book that she was to be "Hung, drawn, & quartered... Hung in diamonds, drawn in a coach and four, and quartered in the best house in the land."
  • 1915
    On her fourteenth birthday, Britain declared war on Germany. Four of her brothers served in the army. Her elder brother, Fergus, an officer in the Black Watch Regiment, was killed in action at the Battle of Loos in 1915.
    More Details Hide Details Another brother, Michael, was reported missing in action on 28 April 1917. Three weeks later, the family discovered he had been captured after being wounded. He remained in a prisoner of war camp for the rest of the war. Glamis was turned into a convalescent home for wounded soldiers, which Elizabeth helped to run.
  • 1900
    She was christened there on 23 September 1900, in the local parish church, All Saints, and her godparents included her paternal aunt Lady Maud Bowes-Lyon and cousin Venetia James.
    More Details Hide Details She spent much of her childhood at St Paul's Walden and at Glamis Castle, the Earl's ancestral home in Scotland. She was educated at home by a governess until the age of eight, and was fond of field sports, ponies and dogs. When she started school in London, she astonished her teachers by precociously beginning an essay with two Greek words from Xenophon's Anabasis. Her best subjects were literature and scripture. After returning to private education under a German Jewish governess, Käthe Kübler, she passed the Oxford Local Examination with distinction at age thirteen.
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