Rachel Whiteread
British sculptor
Rachel Whiteread
Rachel Whiteread, CBE is an English artist, best known for her sculptures, which typically take the form of casts. She won the annual Turner Prize in 1993—the first woman to win the prize. Whiteread is one of the Young British Artists, and exhibited at the Royal Academy's Sensation exhibition in 1997.
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Rachel Whiteread's personal information overview.
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The Art Fairs of Frieze Week 2013
Huffington Post - over 3 years
Julian Hoeber, Twins #1 (Execution Changes #44, #45), 2011. Courtesy of Blum & Poe. It’s London’s turn in the great art fair cycle, and Frieze and its satellites have descended upon the British city for the eleventh year. The Carmody Groarke-designed pavilion will be even roomier this year, with wider aisles to suit visitor’s comfort and optimize the art-viewing experience. Along with the expected roster of top galleries, the fair welcomes some new seasoned faces like Blum & Poe, Marian Goodman and Maccarone. As expected, the powers behind Frieze have a world class line up of special exhibitions, film and a sculpture park curated by Clare Lilley, Director of Programs at Yorkshire Sculpture Park, that will pair contemporary and historical pieces, giving a well-rounded presentation of modern masters like Judy Chicago, Jaume Plensa and Rachel Whiteread. Judy Chicago, Rearrangeable Rainbow Blocks, 1965. Courtesy of Riflemaker. Nicola Lees of the Frieze Foundation wil ...
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Huffington Post article
Sculptor Whiteread explores the simple life in new UK show
Reuters.com - almost 4 years
LONDON (Reuters) - Garden sheds, tin cans and other everyday objects form the backbone of a new show by British sculptor Rachel Whiteread which celebrates the simple things we take for granted in life.
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Reuters.com article
Turner prize awarded to Elizabeth Price for 'seductive' video work
Guardian (UK) - about 4 years
Bradford-born artist receives £25,000 prize from actor Jude Law at Tate Britain reception On the face of it they are wildly different: ecclesiastical architecture, a 1960s girl band performance and a terrible furniture store blaze that helped change UK fire laws. But Elizabeth Price's powerful fusion of the three elements to make a 20-minute film seemed to grip audiences and led to her being named winner of the 2012 Turner prize. The Bradford-born artist was given the £25,000 award by the actor Jude Law at a champagne reception in London. Although she had been shortlisted for a trio of films exhibited at the Baltic in Gateshead, it was one film, The Woolworths Choir of 1979, that was exhibited at this year's Turner show at Tate Britain and delighted most critics. The Daily Telegraph's Richard Dorment called it a "visual tour-de-force" and "20 of the most exhilarating minutes I've ever spent in an art gallery". Price was arguably the least well-known of the artists on the shortlis ...
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Guardian (UK) article
Rachel Whiteread: 'I'm not a joiner-in'
Guardian (UK) - over 4 years
Her massive works of art have caused both wonder and controversy. As Rachel Whiteread's latest piece is unveiled, Mark Lawson hikes up a ladder to talk to her about thick skins and ageing YBAs On a morning in late May, wearing hard hats and high-vis jackets, Rachel Whiteread and I climb up flights of aluminium ladders through three levels of scaffolding to inspect the progress of her latest work: a frieze on the facade of the Whitechapel Art Gallery in east London. Whiteread ascends as swiftly as a seasoned sailor on a ship's rigging, the journey now a familiar one, although we go up on a rare day when rainwater on the metal steps hasn't been a worry. "We hadn't realised we'd be doing this in the monsoon period," she says, "so it's taken longer than we thought." Her first experience of this perspective, she explains, was "from a cherrypicker on one of the coldest days of last year, in snow and blizzards. But I've lived and worked in this area for 25 years, so I know the landscape ve ...
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Guardian (UK) article
Interview with Rachel Whiteread
Ft.com Financial Times Blogs - about 5 years
The sculptor tells Rachel Spence about her first permanent public artwork in the UK, a frieze for the Whitechapel Gallery
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Ft.com Financial Times Blogs article
Ryan Gander: Locked Room Scenario, Londonewcastle Depot, London - The Independent
Google News - over 5 years
Artangel has a rather proud history of public projects in Britain – think Rachel Whiteread's House (1993), the artist's concrete cast of the interior of a condemned terraced house in Bow, or, more recently, Roger Hiorns' Seizure (2009) another dank,
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Google News article
Bianca Stigter - Per ongeluk expres - 8 Weekly
Google News - over 5 years
Stigter vermengt hoge en lage cultuur schijnbaar achteloos: ze schrijft over het werk van de kunstenares Rachel Whiteread en dichteres Forough Farrokhzad, maar beargumenteert in haar boek ook waarom George Clooney de nieuwe Cary Grant genoemd kan
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Google News article
Ryan Gander: Locked Room Scenario – review - The Guardian
Google News - over 5 years
The installation was commissioned by Artangel, a company dedicated to taking art beyond the confines of the gallery wall, and whose past successes have included Rachel Whiteread's House (1993), a life-size cast of a Victorian house in London's East End
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Google News article
Ryan Gander's exhibition won't make immediate sense - Evening Standard
Google News - over 5 years
It is being created in collaboration with Artangel, the visionary commissioning body that brought us Rachel Whiteread's concrete cast of a house, Roger Hiorns's shimmering blue-crystal cave in an Elephant and Castle flat and, last year,
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Google News article
O que ver no museu: John Singer Sargent ou Damien Hirst? - Vermelho
Google News - over 5 years
Para esse meu experimento científico, o Museu escolhido foi o Tate Britain. A coleção do museu vai desde obras de pintores como William Hogarth e John Singer Sargent até artistas contemporâneos como Tracey Emin, Damien Hirst e Rachel Whiteread
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Google News article
New London Books Roundup - Londonist
Google News - over 5 years
Rachel Whiteread, too. You'll also encounter, as one reviewer put it, the usual 'endless vainglorious cameos from tediously eccentric friends'. We confess, we're only a quarter of the way through this meaty feast, so will give it a fuller treatment to
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Google News article
'THE HOUSE WITHOUT THE DOOR' - New York Times
Google News - over 5 years
Beyond this threshold is a sort of gallery squat, furnished with Rachel Whiteread's cast-urethane mattress and Toba Khedoori's waxen drawing of a fireplace. Here too are Gregor Schneider's creepy photographs of his former family home in Rheydt,
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Google News article
Eva Hesse at the ICA and Tory Fair at the deCordova - The Phoenix
Google News - over 5 years
Hesse's ability to imbue her art with body and blood and gravity anticipated the kinder, gentler minimalism of today's Anish Kapoor, Rachel Whiteread, and Roni Horn, as well as the fleshy fairy-tale figures of Kiki Smith. Boston sculptor Tory Fair has
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Google News article
Exhibition: The Space Between - Creative Review (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Channelling the artist Rachel Whiteread, the piece was created by casting details of the existing building in latex. Another piece seemingly inspired by the contemporary art world, this time by the work of Anya Gallaccio, was Unwanted Change by Fiona
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Google News article
FLAG Art Foundation - Artnet
Google News - over 5 years
The second masterpiece is Rachel Whiteread's Untitled (Pair) (1999), bronze coffins painted in creamy cellulose, which double as bathtubs and perhaps unconsciously reference the shapemaking of Allan McCollum. Whiteread's subtlety of form puts the
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Google News article
Wales National Museum of Art Enters World Stage - ArtLyst
Google News - over 5 years
... in July 2011 — I cannot escape this place — includes works by artists associated with Wales such as Josef Herman and Shani Rhys James alongside leading British and international artists including Lucian Freud, David Hockney and Rachel Whiteread
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Google News article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Rachel Whiteread
    FORTIES
  • 2008
    Age 44
    She was one of the five artists shortlisted for the Angel of the South project in January 2008.
    More Details Hide Details The Gran Boathouse is located on the waters edge in Gran Norway. From a distance it looks like any other boathouse, but closer inspection reveals that this is a work of art in concrete. The work is a cast of the interior of an old boathouse. Whiteread turns the boathouse inside out thereby capturing a moment in time. In this way she encourages us to reflect on what we see around us. "I have mummified the air inside the boathouse", says Rachel Whiteread. "I wanted to make a shy sculpture, a sculpture that would stand there peaceful and noble". The boathouse and its interior had all the qualities that she was looking for. It represented the history of place. The sculpture is preserving what would otherwise have been lost. Cast from generic wooden sheds, Detached 1, Detached 2, and Detached 3 (2012) render the empty interior of a garden shed in concrete and steel. Circa 1665 (I) (2012), LOOK, LOOK, LOOK (2012) and Loom (2012) belong to a series cast from doors and windows in shades of rose, eau-de-nil, or steely resin. Propped against or affixed to walls, the sculptures glow with absorbed and reflected light.
  • 2005
    Age 41
    Throughout the latter half of September 2005 and mid-way into October her work Embankment was installed and was made public on 10 October.
    More Details Hide Details It consists of some 14,000 translucent, white polyethylene boxes (themselves casts of the inside of cardboard boxes) stacked in various ways; some in very tall mountain-like peaks and others in lower (though still over human height), rectangular, more levelled arrangements. They are fixed in position with adhesive. She cited the end scenes of both Raiders of the Lost Ark and Citizen Kane as visual precursors; she also spoke of the death of her mother and a period of upheaval which involved packing and moving comparable boxes. It is also thought that her recent trip to the Arctic is an inspiration, although critics counter that white is merely the colour the polyethylene comes in, and it would have added significantly to the expense to dye them. The boxes were manufactured from casts of ten distinct cardboard boxes by a company that produces grit bins and traffic bollards.
  • 2004
    Age 40
    In spring 2004, she was offered the annual Unilever series commission to produce a piece for Tate Modern's vast Turbine Hall, delaying acceptance for five to six months until she was confident she could conceive of a work to fill the space.
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  • THIRTIES
  • 2003
    Age 39
    Her mother, Patricia Whiteread (née Lancaster), who was also an artist, died in 2003 at the age of 72.
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  • 1998
    Age 34
    In 1998, Whiteread made Water Tower as part of a grant for New York City's Public Art Fund.
    More Details Hide Details The piece, which is 12' 2" and 9' in diameter, was a translucent resin cast of a water tower installed on a rooftop in New York City's SoHo district. It has been called "an extremely beautiful object, which changes colour with the sky, and also a very appropriate one, celebrating one of the most idiosyncratic and charming features of the New York skyline." Just as Ghost led on to the larger and better known House, so Water Tower led to the more public Trafalgar Square plinth work three years later. Whiteread's casts often seem to emphasise the fact that the objects they represent are not themselves there, and critics have often regarded her work to be redolent of death and absence. Given this, it is perhaps not surprising that she was asked by Austrian authorities to create a work in remembrance of Austrian Jews killed during the Holocaust. Due to political sensitivities and bureaucracy the process, from commission to unveiling, took five years.
  • 1997
    Age 33
    For the Sensation exhibition in 1997, Whiteread exhibited Untitled (One Hundred Spaces), a series of resin casts of the space underneath chairs.
    More Details Hide Details This work can be seen as a descendant of Bruce Nauman's concrete cast of the area under his chair of 1965. The critical response included: "like a field of large glace sweets, it is her most spectacular, and benign installation to date Monuments to domesticity, they are like solidified jellies, opalescent ice-cubes, or bars of soap – lavender, rose, spearmint, lilac. They look like a regulated graveyard or a series of futuristic standing stones with a passing resemblance to television sets." "Particularly effective when bathed in natural light, it creates beauty from domestic nothingness."
  • TWENTIES
  • 1993
    Age 29
    It drew mixed responses, winning her both the Turner Prize for best young British artist in 1993 and the K Foundation art award for worst British artist. She was the first woman to win a Turner Prize. Tower Hamlets London Borough Council demolished House on 11 January 1994, a decision which caused some controversy itself.
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    House, perhaps her best known work, was a concrete cast of the inside of an entire Victorian terraced house completed in autumn 1993, exhibited at the location of the original house – 193 Grove Road – in East London (all the houses in the street had earlier been knocked down by the council).
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  • 1992
    Age 28
    During this period in 1992 and 1993 Whiteread had an artist residency in Berlin with a scholarship from the DAAD Artist's Programme.
    More Details Hide Details While in Berlin, she created Untitled (Room), the cast of a generic, anonymous room that she built herself. She finished the interior of a room-size box with wallpaper, windows and door before casting. The sculpture is in the collection of the Museum of Modern Art in New York.
    She and James Lingwood of Artangel looked at houses to be torn down in North and East London in 1992, but without success in securing one.
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  • 1991
    Age 27
    She had begun considering casting an entire house in 1991.
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  • 1990
    Age 26
    She completed Ghost in 1990.
    More Details Hide Details It was cast from a room in a house on Archway Road in north London, much like the house she grew up in. The road was being widened and the house torn down. She used plaster to cast the parlor walls and ceiling in sections and assembled them on a metal frame. Ghost was first shown at the nonprofit Chisenhale Gallery. It was purchased by Charles Saatchi and included with other works by Whiteread in his first "Young British Art" show in 1992. In May 2004 a fire in a Momart storage warehouse destroyed many works from the Saatchi collection, including, it is believed, some by Whiteread. However Ghost had recently been moved from the warehouse to the new Gagosian Gallery in London. The work was acquired by the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. in the fall of 2004.
  • 1988
    Age 24
    Both sculptures were exhibited in her first solo show in 1988 along with casts of other domestic pieces.
    More Details Hide Details The work all sold and allowed her to apply for grants to find funding for larger sculptures. After her first solo exhibition, Whiteread decided to cast the space that her domestic objects could have inhabited. She applied for grants, describing the project as "mummifying the air in a room."
    Her father, Thomas Whiteread, was a geography teacher, polytechnic administrator and lifelong supporter of the Labour Party, who died when Whiteread was studying at art school in 1988.
    More Details Hide Details She is the third of three sisters – the older two being identical twins.
  • 1987
    Age 23
    She began to exhibit in 1987, with her first solo exhibition coming in 1988.
    More Details Hide Details She lives and works in a former synagogue in east London with long-term partner and fellow sculptor Marcus Taylor. They have two sons. Many of Whiteread's works are casts of ordinary domestic objects and, in numerous cases, their so-called negative space. For example, she is known for making solid casts of the open space in and around pieces of furniture such as tables and chairs, architectural details and even entire rooms and buildings. She says the casts carry "the residue of years and years of use". Whiteread mainly focuses on the line and the form for her pieces. While still at the Slade, Whiteread cast domestic objects and created her first sculpture, Closet. She made a plaster cast of the interior of a wooden wardrobe and covered it with black felt. It was based on comforting childhood memories of hiding in a dark closet. After she graduated she rented space for a studio using the Enterprise Allowance Scheme. She created Shallow Breath (1988), the cast of the underside of a bed, made not long after her father died.
  • TEENAGE
  • 1982
    Age 18
    Whiteread studied at the Faculty of Arts and Architecture, Brighton Polytechnic from 1982 to 1985.
    More Details Hide Details Though she graduated with a BA in painting, she spent much of her time doing sculpture. She took a workshop on casting with the sculptor Richard Wilson and began to realize the possibilities in casting objects. She was briefly at the Cyprus College of Art. From 1985 to 1987 she studied sculpture at Slade School of Art, University College, London, graduating with an MA in 1987. For a time she worked in Highgate Cemetery fixing lids back onto time-damaged coffins.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1963
    Born
    Whiteread was born in 1963 in Ilford, Essex, and raised in the Essex countryside until age seven, when the family moved to London.
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Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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