Randle Mell
Randle Mell
Randle Mell, is a television and film actor. He is married to Battlestar Galactica star Mary McDonnell. The couple has two children.
Biography
Randle Mell's personal information overview.
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News
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Preaching law to test free speech protections
Brisbane Times - over 4 years
The High Court will today consider whether a law restricting preaching in Adelaide's Rundle Mall is unconstitutional in what observers say is an important test of free speech protections.
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Brisbane Times article
Rundle Mall pleased with Anzac trading response
Yahoo News- Australia - almost 5 years
The Rundle Mall Management Authority says strong trading on Anzac Day has vindicated the South Australian Government's new shopping laws.Shops were allowed to open from 11:00am but the Rundle Mall Management ...
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Yahoo News- Australia article
THEATER REVIEW; Subtle Spins In an Old Tale
NYTimes - over 17 years
Did you hear the one about the old maid and the traveling salesman? Groan if you will, but there was a time when the question summed up not only a whole species of smutty jokes but also a gentler genre of romantic comedies. You know the formula, which was given its most popular incarnation in ''The Music Man'': flashy con artist meets buttoned-up
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Review/Film; The Accidents and Miracles in Everyday Life
NYTimes - about 25 years
Mack (Kevin Kline), the central character in Lawrence Kasdan's "Grand Canyon," hauntingly describes the experience of almost being hit by a bus. He was standing on a street corner, he recalls, and was about to step off the curb without looking when a stranger pulled him back. When he thanked her, she smiled and said, "My pleasure," then
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TV Weekend; The Art and the Passion of O'Keeffe and Stieglitz
NYTimes - over 25 years
One of this century's more unorthodox relationships, providing a lavish feast for gossips, is skillfully -- and sometimes discreetly -- recalled in "A Marriage: Georgia O'Keeffe and Alfred Stieglitz," tonight's "American Playhouse" presentation at 9 on Channel 13. There are other characters in the drama but the focus is kept so tightly on the two
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NYTimes article
TV Weekend; A Willa Cather Classic About Settlers in Nebraska
NYTimes - almost 26 years
With a gracious bow to Thornton Wilder's "Our Town," Darrah Cloud's adaptation of "O Pioneers!," Willa Cather's 1913 autobiographical novel, uses a bare stage and a few props to conjure up the life of a family and community over several decades. The place in this instance is rural Nebraska, and the story begins with the arrival of Swedish settlers
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NYTimes article
FILM; Mary McDonnell Builds a Bridge Across Cultures
NYTimes - about 26 years
Mary McDonnell had played many kinds of women on stage and film -- a boarding house proprietor, a lesbian feminist, a social worker, a beleaguered yuppie -- but how would she perform as a white woman who had lived virtually all her life on the prairie with the Lakota Sioux? "I had to find my way into authentic territory," Ms. McDonnell says. "I had
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Review/Theater; Relearning the Lesson of Miller's 'Crucible'
NYTimes - almost 27 years
LEAD: ''The Crucible'' is not only Arthur Miller's most-produced play; it has also become his most continually relevant work of political theater. By focusing on the Salem witch hunts of the 17th century, the playwright placed the outrage of McCarthyism in historical perspective and created a drama that has remained meaningful to succeeding
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Review/Theater; Bonding With the Land In Cather's 'O Pioneers!'
NYTimes - about 27 years
LEAD: For Willa Cather, ''O Pioneers!'' was the novel in which she spoke for the first time in her own voice, free of influence and literary tradition. In it, she said, she had hit ''the home pasture,'' and the book was to set her off on her creative journey. Written in 1913, ''O Pioneers!'' remains one of the enduring works of American literature.
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Review/Theater; A 'Macbeth' Starring Plummer and Jackson
NYTimes - almost 29 years
LEAD: The destiny of Macbeth becomes clear in the opening scenes of Shakespeare's play, once the witches chart out a grisly future that the hero seems all too willing to embrace. The destiny of ''Macbeth,'' as acted by Christopher Plummer and Glenda Jackson on Broadway, can be guessed even earlier. Open the Playbill, and one finds one of the
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RUSSIANS UPSTAGE A PLAY
NYTimes - about 30 years
LEAD: The nuances of the evening were not lost on Washingtonians Thursday as they gathered for the American premiere of the Russian director Yuri Lyubimov's production of ''Crime and Punishment'' at Arena Stage. The nuances of the evening were not lost on Washingtonians Thursday as they gathered for the American premiere of the Russian director
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THEATER: 'CRIME AND PUNISHMENT'
NYTimes - about 30 years
LEAD: When Raskolnikov, the lapsed student turned ax murderer, is consumed by delirium in the director Yuri Lyubimov's adaptation of ''Crime and Punishment,'' he doesn't merely sulk or weep - he becomes almost literally unhinged. Raskolnikov (Randle Mell) stands against the blood-smeared white door of the scene of his crime and writhes in pain as
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BROADWAY
NYTimes - over 30 years
SAMUEL BECKETT directing Samuel Beckett is news. When it is the only production of his play ''Krapp's Last Tape'' that Beckett ever directed, that is also news. And when this particular production is performed by Rick Cluchey, a former San Quentin inmate, a close friend and protege of the playwright who has interpreted Beckett's works in Europe and
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STAGE: 'TEN BY TENNESSEE,' SHORT WILLIAMS PLAYS
NYTimes - almost 31 years
THE lonely people in ''Ten by Tennessee,'' an anthology of 10 short plays by Tennessee Williams, reach out for dependency - and find it insufficient life support. In play after play at the Lucille Lortel Theater, we feel the need, loss, regret and despair. At the same time, most of the plays are love stories and almost all are heightened by the
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'THE CRADLE WILL ROCK,' BLITZSTEIN'S LABOR OPERA
NYTimes - about 31 years
MARC BLITZSTEIN'S controversial labor opera, ''The Cradle Will Rock,'' struck sparks when it was first produced on Broadway in 1937, under the auspices of the W.P.A. And in its 1983 Off Broadway revival at the American Place Theater, featuring alumni of the Acting Company, the satirical work emerged as a rugged period piece whose wit and
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THE STAGE: 'LUNIN: THEATER OF DEATH'
NYTimes - over 31 years
ONE is not quite sure whether John Patrick Shanley is holding the characters in ''Savage in Limbo'' up to ridicule or seeking a compassionate understanding of them. The gifted actors in this first play in the premiere season of the Double Image Repertory Company at the 47th Street Theater makes Mr. Shanley's lonely people interesting and sometimes
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STAGE: CAROLE SHELLEY HEADS NEW 'NOISES OFF' CAST
NYTimes - about 32 years
Over a year after its arrival in New York, Michael Frayn's farce ''Noises Off'' remains the funniest show on Broadway. This says something about Broadway, of course: There haven't been a lot of laughs around Times Square as of late. But, even if the competition were stiffer, ''Noises Off'' would continue to hold its own. Between London and New
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STAGE: CHILDREN OF 60'S IN WEEKEND REUNION
NYTimes - over 33 years
EARLY on in Kathleen Tolan's ''Weekend Near Madison,'' a new play about aging moonchildren of the 1960's, a blocked painter named Jim (Randle Mell) explains his views about art. For art to be vital, he says, it must be ''raw'' and ''without skin'': an artist must create because he has no choice, because his work simply ''had to be done.'' Curiously
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'CRADLE' CAST REVIVES THE SPIRIT OF THE 30'S
NYTimes - over 33 years
All three were born long after that historic opening night in 1937. The oldest, Randle Mell, is only 31. He dances and sings and shouts his exuberant way through the role of Larry Foreman, the union organizer in ''The Cradle Will Rock,'' Marc Blitzstein's labor opera now in revival at the Douglas Fairbanks Theater. He also plays the corrupt artist
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THEATER: 'LABOR OPERA' BY BLITZSTEIN IS REVIVED
NYTimes - almost 34 years
JUST before each performance of ''The Cradle Will Rock'' at the American Place Theater, John Houseman walks to a podium to deliver a 10-minute lecture. We're used to watching Mr. Houseman lecture these days: with his bow tie, crusty demeanor and authoritative voice, he has become, courtesy of television, our foremost unofficial university
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Timeline
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