Randolph Mantooth
American actor
Randolph Mantooth
Randolph Mantooth is an American character actor of stage, film and television. Mantooth is best known for his work in the 1970s medical drama, Emergency!, as Johnny Gage, a Los Angeles County Fire Department paramedic. He is also known for his work on the E! Network's program Talk Soup alongside host John Henson, and for appearing in various soap operas starting in 1987.
Biography
Randolph Mantooth's personal information overview.
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Relationships
View family, career and love interests for Randolph Mantooth
News
News abour Randolph Mantooth from around the web
Tim Traeger: Councilman Vinatieri embedded in public service - Whittier Daily News
Google News - over 5 years
But while they were more qualified than the fictional John Gage (Randolph Mantooth) and Roy DeSoto (Kevin Tighe), Dauod and Kenney have a new world of technology at their fingertips to save lives and reduce trauma. Joe and I were greeted by Battalion
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Google News article
DVD Reviews / Emergency! The Final Rescues - FireEngineering.com
Google News - over 5 years
In fact, the very first, "The Steel Inferno," appears to be a direct rip-off of Irwin Allen's "The Towering Inferno," with Julie London, Robert Fuller, Kevin Tighe, Bobby Troup and Randolph Mantooth back in their regular roles
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Google News article
Bill Haggard talks about firefighting, big fires, and the Jefferson County ... - STLtoday.com
Google News - over 5 years
The banquet's keynote speaker will be Randolph Mantooth, who played firefighter/paramedic Johnny Gage on the 1970s TV show "Emergency!" Haggard, 59, of Herculaneum, is in his 42nd year as a volunteer firefighter. A retired teacher, he also is
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Google News article
Wiser for the time - Western Star
Google News - over 5 years
American actor Randolph Mantooth presented on the dangers of the job, while firefighter Paul Mackenzie spoke about coping with job-related stress outside the workforce. “They go back home with a positive feeling, a sense they learned something valuable
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Google News article
Emergency! “51 in Quarters” - JEMS.com
Google News - over 5 years
Food and drink vendors were gearing up for the crowd, as were the staff of the LA County Fire Museum who had advertised commemorative T-shirts and items as well as autograph opportunities by Randolph Mantooth (aka Johnny Gage) and Mike Stoker,
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Google News article
The Stars That Popularized Paramedicine - Wall Street Journal
Google News - over 5 years
Randolph Mantooth and Kevin Tighe, the human stars of the 1970s hit television series. "Emergency!" was about two firefighters, John Gage (Randolph Mantooth) and Roy DeSoto (Kevin Tighe), who were pioneers in a brand new specialty called paramedicine
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Por Onde Anda Randolph Mantooth? - veja.com
Google News - over 5 years
Conhecido por estrelar a série “Emergência”, produzida entre 1972 e 1978, Randolph Mantooth era um dos ídolos da TV ao longo da década de 1970. Talvez porque a própria produção já foi um marco, tanto para a televisão quanto para a vida real
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Google News article
Association trying to improve benefits and conditions for firefighters - Western Star
Google News - almost 6 years
One of the guest speakers for the convention will be Randolph Mantooth. The actor and producer is well known in the fire service for his role as Johnny Gage on “Emergency”, has become an advocate for first responder health and safety, speaking on the
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Google News article
New DVD releases include Will Smith in final season of 'Fresh Prince of Bel-Air' - Plain Dealer
Google News - almost 6 years
The show creatively mixed elements of medical dramas and action shows, following Los Angeles paramedics and emergency room workers as they race to save lives. Robert Fuller, Randolph Mantooth, Julie London and Kevin Tighe star. Two discs, 540 minutes
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Google News article
THEATER GUIDE
NYTimes - over 13 years
A selective listing by critics of The Times of new or noteworthy Broadway and Off Broadway shows this weekend. Approximate running times are in parentheses. * denotes a highly recommended show. + means discounted tickets were available at the Theater Development Fund's TKTS booth for performances last Friday and Saturday nights. ++ means discounted
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NYTimes article
THEATER REVIEW; There's No Silver Lining In a Mushroom Cloud
NYTimes - almost 14 years
As a scientist's wife in ''Rain Dance,'' the compact, elegiac new play by Lanford Wilson, Suzanne Regan emanates the concentrated stillness of someone who knows she has to stay quiet to keep from falling apart. An émigré from Hitler's Germany, Irene has been uprooted again and again. Now she finds herself at what seems to be the very brink of the
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NYTimes article
Stretching Muscles, Not Wallets: Where to Work Out for Less
NYTimes - almost 21 years
IN New York, where private-school tuition approaches that of Harvard University and where having a good French meal may require cashing out the money market account, it may come as a surprise that there are actually some places where you can exercise each day for less than the price of a caffe latte. Some of New York's bargain workout spots cost
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NYTimes article
TV VIEW; WHEN THE MEN IN BLUE FADE INTO BLAND
NYTimes - about 27 years
LEAD: Climbing from the bottom to the top of the ratings heap during the last decade or so, NBC was adventurous, taking chances on series such as ''Miami Vice,'' ''Hill Street Blues,'' ''Cheers'' and ''The Cosby Show.'' Today, undoubtedly under pressure to stay a very profitable No. 1, the network, now owned by General Electric, has become
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NYTimes article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Randolph Mantooth
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 2016
    Age 70
    Mantooth will perform in Carey Crim's Morning after Grace at the Purple Rose Theatre in Fall 2016.
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  • 2011
    Age 65
    Mantooth also starred in series such as ER, Criminal Minds, Ghost Whisperer, and most recently as Charlie Horse in Sons of Anarchy in 2011.
    More Details Hide Details Mantooth is marketing a screenplay that was written about Indian gambling, called The Bone Game. Mantooth has frequently returned to his theatre roots in such productions as Arsenic and Old Lace (play) at the Alhambra Dinner Theatre in 1983, and The Man With The Dirty Mind with Don Knotts and Rue McClanahan. In 1984, Mantooth worked with David Carradine and Will Sampson, along with other Native actors, in a production of Black Elk Speaks for the American Indian Theatre Company in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Mantooth continued to do theatre with roles in a variety of plays including Edith Villareal's Crazy from the Heart at the Yale Repertory Theatre in 1986, and Mark Kaufman's Evil Little Thoughts at the Denver Center Theatre in 1991, Mantooth, along with James Van Der Beek performed Lanford Wilson's Rain Dance off-Broadway at the Signature Theatre. Mantooth has also performed in two works written by William S. Yellow Robe, Jr.: Wink-Dah and The Independence of Eddie Rose. Mantooth performed with Donne Coteau in Footprints in Blood for the American Indian Theatre Company (AITCO) at the Old Lady of Brady Theatre in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Mantooth has also performed in Gary Leon Hill's Back to the Blankets at the Denver Center Theatre, in addition to The Paper Crown, and The Inuit.
  • 2007
    Age 61
    In 2007, Mantooth landed the recurring role of Kirk Harmon on One Life to Live.
    More Details Hide Details Besides his work on daytime in the 1990s, Mantooth starred in television movies such as White Cobra Express and portrayed Bing Tupper in both the movie Before the Storm and the series Under Cover. He also starred in a CBS Schoolbreak Special as Mr. Leland in "Please, God, I'm Only Seventeen". In 1999, he played Solonsky in the feature film Enemy Action. Mantooth also made guest appearances in shows such as China Beach, MacGyver, Baywatch, Diagnosis Murder, JAG, Promised Land (TV series), and Walker, Texas Ranger during the 1990s. In 2000 Mantooth played Ken Crandall in the television movie Bitter Suite (original title Time Share) and in 2007 he played Dutch Fallon in the television movie Fire Serpent. Feature film roles include Admiral Edwards in Agent Red (2000), Dr. Willis in He Was a Quiet Man (2007), Ambassador Cartwright in Scream of the Bikini (2009), Richard Cranehill in Bold Native (2010), and Detective Bodrogi in Killer Holiday (2013).
  • FIFTIES
  • 2004
    Age 58
    When Hendrickson left the show in 2004, Mantooth returned to show as Munson, in a recurring position until Hendrickson returned to the program in 2005.
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  • 2003
    Age 57
    In 2003, Mantooth joined the cast of As the World Turns as a temporary replacement for Benjamin Hendrickson in the role of Hal Munson.
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  • 2002
    Age 56
    Before London's and Troup's deaths, all four remained close friends after the series came to a close, and Tighe served as a best man at Mantooth's second wedding in 2002.
    More Details Hide Details While talking with Tom Blixa of WTVN, Mantooth said that at first it was a little intimidating working with Robert Fuller, Bobby Troup, and Julie London, because they were all big stars but after doing a show with them for seven years they all became like family. In the same interview while discussing happenings behind the scenes and blooper reels, Mantooth also said that there was "a lot of salty language though" "and we learned every bad word from Julie London" ”I love her to death but she herself said 'I'm a broad'". In a 2013 interview with the Tolucan Times, Mantooth said of his decades-long colleague, "Julie London was a mentor to all of us. She let the words work for her, rather than emoting; that’s all anybody needed." While Mantooth has been a working actor for forty years, he has remained an advocate of firefighters, paramedics, EMTs, and other emergency medical providers. He makes speeches and personal appearances each year at events across the country, discussing the "inside story of the development of the television series Emergency! and its impact on the EMS system development". Having worked closely with the nation’s first certified firefighter/paramedics, who served as technical advisors on the set of Emergency!, Mantooth brings a perspective and insight into the startup and history of pre-hospital treatment in the field. He worked alongside influential men who made a difference … men he greatly admired … the late Robert A. Cinader, creator and executive producer of Emergency!, and the man known as the Father of Modern Emergency Medical Services, close friend and mentor, the late James O. Page.
  • 2000
    Age 54
    Nearly 30 years after Emergency! debuted, the Smithsonian Institution accepted Emergency! memorabilia into its American History Museum in the public service division and not entertainment on May 16, 2000.
    More Details Hide Details Items inducted at the Smithsonian included their uniforms, scripts, helmets, turnouts, biophone, and defibrillator. In conjunction to the induction of the equipment from Emergency! at the Smithsonian, Project 51 was created as a way to raise funds for a children's burn charity, and show the restored squad around the country. Mantooth along with Marco Lopez, Tim Donnelly, Ron Pinkard, and Mike Stoker embarked on a 10-city tour with the squad to raise funds for charity on their way to Washington, DC, with their final destination being the Smithsonian. Project 51 folded after the equipment was inducted into the Smithsonian and the funds were distributed to burn centers, fire education projects, and museums.
  • 1997
    Age 51
    His character, Alex Masters, did several crossover episodes on One Life to Live in 1997.
    More Details Hide Details Mantooth appeared on General Hospital, One Life to Live, and As the World Turns, where he played both good guys and villains.
  • FORTIES
  • 1990
    Age 44
    Mantooth left for personal reasons in 1990, before returning to the show in 1993, this time in the role of Alex Masters.
    More Details Hide Details The show was later revamped and titled The City, lasting for two more years before folding in 1997.
  • 1987
    Age 41
    He moved back to New York where he explored a new direction in his career with daytime soap operas, earning him four Soap Opera Digest Award nominations. He played Clay Alden in the soap opera, Loving from 1987 through 1990.
    More Details Hide Details It was during this time, that the character, Clay Alden, was actually Alex Masters. Mantooth described the character as a "good guy with an edge."
  • TWENTIES
  • 1973
    Age 27
    Emergency! spun off an animated version called Emergency +4 which ran on NBC Saturday mornings from 1973 to 1976, of which Mantooth's voice was used, along with Kevin Tighe's.
    More Details Hide Details Starship Rescue aired in 1973 to promote NBC's fall lineup of Saturday morning programs focusing on Emergency! and Star Trek: The Animated Series and it was hosted by Mantooth and Tighe. Tighe and Mantooth also presented the work of firefighters and paramedics from the Los Angeles County Fire Department on the NBC Saturday morning's children's show, Go! Mantooth's and Kevin Tighe's likeness were used for games, puzzles, lunch boxes, action figures, and comic books connected to the show. The comic books for Emergency focused on the primary actors from Rampart Hospital, along with Johnny and Roy. The four comic books, and four magazines, were issued by Charlton Comics in 1976. Some of the issues were drawn by John Byrne and Neal Adams. Emergency! +4 and Emergency! both had coloring books that were created to promote the show to young viewers using the likenesses of the five principal characters. Viewmaster released a series of reels that had film stills of the show arranged in a story or photo montage.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1945
    Born
    Mantooth, the oldest of four children, was born as Randy DeRoy Mantooth in Sacramento, California, in 1945, to Sadie (née Neddenreip) and Donald (Buck) Mantooth.
    More Details Hide Details He is of Seminole, Cherokee, Potawatomi, Scottish, and German descent. His mother was of German descent; his father was from Oklahoma. His siblings are Don Mantooth, Nancy Mantooth and Tonya Mantooth. Because of their father's job in the construction industry, Mantooth lived in 24 states, finally settling in Santa Barbara, California, where he grew up. Mantooth attended San Marcos High School and participated in school plays. Following his studies at Santa Barbara City College, he received a scholarship to the American Academy of Dramatic Arts in New York. It was there that he chose to change his first name from "Randy" to stage name "Randolph", keeping his last name. His performance as "Gar" in the play Philadelphia Here I Come earned him the Charles Jehlenger Award for Best Actor, an honor he shared with fellow actor Brad Davis.
Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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