Raymond F. Chandler
US Army soldier
Raymond F. Chandler
Raymond F. Chandler III is the current Sergeant Major of the Army in the United States. He was sworn in as the 14th Sergeant Major of the Army on March 1, 2011. Chandler has served in all tank crewman positions and has had multiple tours as a troop, squadron and regimental master gunner.
Biography
Raymond F. Chandler's personal information overview.
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News
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In Praise of Libraries
Huffington Post - 4 months
I recently had the honor of speaking at the 2016 New England Library Association Conference. As I walked up the steps to the podium, I kept my eyes focused on the stairs, hoping I wouldn't pull a Jennifer Lawrence, Oscar's Night move and trip on the way up. I was nervous and dry-mouthed. What possible qualifications did I have to tell librarians anything? A confession: I am in awe of librarians. They are the most curious, agile, techno-savvy people around. They have figured out how to go beyond offering books and now provide anything else you can imagine: concerts and community reading programs, museum passes and meeting rooms, teen lounges and lectures. Even more amazing is the fact that our librarians--along with the help of involved volunteers--have figured out how to pay for all of these resources and services, despite constant budgetary battles over scant public funding. Libraries are among the few public institutions that are truly democratic. Librarians are the ...
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Huffington Post article
If You See Something, Say Something: Garry Marshall
Huffington Post - 7 months
Garry Marshall, who died on Tuesday, was a Rolls Royce of punchlines, a wisecrack machine of the first order with impeccable class. "I like young people who are in that brief window between on their-way-up and rehab," he said to me. "In that window I can make stars." Then he admitted that the window business wasn't totally true -- but the line was just too good to give up. Now that's eating your cake and having it, too. How do you not love that? We also agreed that "Took me three hours to figure out F.U. was Felix Ungar!" is maybe the funniest punchline ever written. (It was not his, of course, but Neil Simon's. And it never made it past the ABC censors when Marshall shepherded the Broadway hit, which had been staged by Mike Nichols, into sitcom history.) "My first series was a show called Hey, Landlord," Marshall told me. "It was No. 99 in the ratings. It's pretty hard to be 99 in the ratings." That was accurate enough, though the short-lived sitcom that gave him his debut as sh ...
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Huffington Post article
'The Big Sheep' Plays Hardboiled Sci-Fi To The Hilt
NPR - 8 months
It's not hard to parse the two main influences on Robert Kroese's new novel, The Big Sheep: Philip K. Dick and Raymond Chandler. But Kroese's knack for humor helps elevate their gonzo grimness.
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NPR article
Scott Deitche: Cocktail Noir Is A Hit
Huffington Post - over 1 year
Scott Deitche, the author best known for Cigar City Mafia and The Silent Don, has put together the definitive work on booze, bars, gangsters, and those that chronicle the exploits of the underworld; the crime writer. With just the right blend of alcohol, gangster, and writer (shaken, not stirred), Deitche assembles an All-Star cast of drinks, stories, those that inspire the tales, and those that craft them. In an evening of frivolity, one can mimic the drinking habits of Al Capone and Meyer Lansky, or they can post up in the favorite bars of mobsters and enjoy drinks in the style of Raymond Chandler, Dennis Lehane, or Arthur Conan Doyle. The beauty of the book is that it takes overlapping components of the mafia lifestyle, and those that archive or glamorize that life, and combines them in a powerful piece of pop culture that can only be described as fun. Scott Deitche explains the genesis of Cocktail Noir. "I thought Noir was a great concept because a lot of these crime s ...
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Huffington Post article
'The Promise,' A Conversation With Robert Crais
Huffington Post - over 1 year
Photo: Exley Foto Robert Crais, known to lovers of suspense and crime novels for having written many New York Times bestsellers, including Suspect and Taken, has just completed The Promise, his twentieth novel and the latest in his Elvis Cole and Joe Pike series. He began his career by writing television scripts for shows such as Quincy, Miami Vice, and LA Law. He credits Raymond Chandler, Dashiell Hammett, Ernest Hemingway, Robert B. Parker, and John Steinbeck for influencing his writing style. In The Promise, Elvis is hired to find a woman who's disappeared. He learns she's an explosives expert who worked for a Defense Department contractor. Meanwhile, LAPD K-9 Officer Scott James and his dog, Maggie, track a fugitive to a house filled with explosives...and, a dead body. As Elvis Cole embarks on a search for the missing woman, he learns the two cases intersect, and could very well bring an end to the lives of Joe Pike, Scott James, Maggie, and his own. I get the f ...
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Huffington Post article
Lights! Camera! Ballots!
Huffington Post - over 1 year
"If my books had been any worse, I wouldn't have been invited to Hollywood; if they had been any better, I wouldn't have gone."--Raymond Chandler No one is going to tell you that Hollywood is, first and foremost, all about the "art," the "inspiration," the "creativity," and that any endeavor that is remotely concerned with "commerce" is of secondary importance. No one is going to tell you that. Every movie ever made--even David Lynch's "Eraserhead," and Lars von Trier's "Dogville"--was made in the hope of turning a profit. At the same time, despite Hollywood's putative obsession with the bottom-line, that doesn't mean the studios (not just the indies but the majors) haven't produced hundreds of sensitive, meaningful and undeniably artistic films, because they clearly have. But still, the movie business is a business. Which brings us to the pesky topic of "test audiences." Some years ago I read that there were only three directors who wielded "final cut" privileges, meaning th ...
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Huffington Post article
Write Now: Got Pulp?
Huffington Post - over 1 year
I was asked the other day to explain what makes pulp storytelling different from other types of fiction. My knee-jerk reaction was to claim, it's hard to define, but I know it when I read it -- which does little to answer the question. I've since thought a lot about what constitutes the pulp style of storytelling, which engenders both excoriating scorn from critics and fanatical devotion from acolytes. By now, most readers know the term pulp was coined in reference to the thousands of inexpensive fiction magazines whose heyday spanned the 1920s through the 1950s. Printed on cheap wood pulp paper, the pulps were typically 7 inches by 10 inches in size, 128 pages long, and sported eye grabbing, luridly colored covers, and ragged, untrimmed edges. Today, the original pulps are more often collected for their gaudy covers than for the fluctuating quality of the words in between. At the height of their popularity there were hundreds of pulp magazine titles gracing the newsstands ea ...
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Huffington Post article
The Myth of the Suicidal Writer
Huffington Post - almost 2 years
Looking at the long list of writers who have committed suicide, one is tempted to associate the so-called artistic temperament, the agony of creative achievement, with the primary motivation for that final act. The list is long and includes many well-known literary figures like Earnest Hemingway, Richard Brautigan, Louis Adamic, Romain Gary, Sylvia Plath, Arthur Koestler, Primo Levi, Ross Lockridge Jr., John Kennedy Toole, David Foster Wallace, Virginia Woolf, Jack London Stefan Zweig, Raymond Chandler and Hunter Thompson among others. Those who tend to associate the internal struggles of the creative life with suicide often concoct reasons based on romantic, legendary assumptions that making art requires a private agony based on a God-given talent that forces its possessor to see and feel more than ordinary mortals. The myth contends that because the artist is blessed with such extraordinary insight, he or she can see into deeper truths where there is only futili ...
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Huffington Post article
Argument Over Literary Forms Turns Deadly in Russia
Huffington Post - about 3 years
YEKATERINBURG, Russia -- As we're wont to say in my family, y'all ain't gonna believe this: It seems a former school teacher in Russia's Sverdlosk district stabbed and killed his friend in a drunken argument over the superiority of poetry versus prose. In case you've forgotten, it's been a scant four months since another Russian was shot and killed in a disagreement about Kant, as in you kant make this stuff up. Philosophy is serious business -- but literature?! The only account I've seen so far is short on facts and long on speculation, but according to a statement from investigators: "The literary dispute soon grew into a banal conflict, on the basis of which the 53-year-old admirer of poetry killed his opponent with the help of a knife." From which we can conclude that the Russian constabulary is none too keen on poetry, prose or good writing of any stripe. I mean really - "banal?" Please. Here's how that should have been written: "He struck with fury, sharp and steely A ...
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Huffington Post article
A Q&A With Director Peter Hyams Takes Us Closer
Huffington Post - about 3 years
Peter Hyams has been making movies for over 40 years. A native New Yorker, Hyams has the distinction of being one of the only directors who also serves as his own cinematographer on his films, a hyphenate that has caused him some controversy among cameramen (see below for more details). After making his mark with such classics as Capricorn One, Outland, The Star Chamber, 2010, and many others, Hyams hasn't slowed down, bringing us his 21st feature film. Enemies Closer is a white-knuckle thriller starring Jean-Claude Van Damme as the ruthless (and flamboyant) leader of a drug cartel on a search and destroy mission for his missing cache of product, which sits at the bottom of a lake on the U.S.-Canadian border. Tom Everett Scott plays the U.S. Park Ranger with a murky past who tries to stop him, along with Orlando Jones as a vengeful ex-con and Linzey Cocker as a damsel in distress with a secret of her own. The Lionsgate release is currently playing in selected theaters and is availab ...
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Huffington Post article
Chiwetel Ejiofor joins Hollywood elite as 12 Years a Slave tipped for Oscars
Guardian (UK) - about 3 years
After parallel successes on stage and screen, the Londoner is being lauded as one of the greatest actors of his generation However good they are, actors always need a defining role to transform them into a film star, and as the kidnap victim Solomon Northup in the Steve McQueen-directed 12 Years a Slave, Chiwetel Ejiofor has found his. Always an impressive performer on screen – certainly since his breakthrough role as a refugee doctor opposite Audrey Tautou in 2002's Dirty Pretty Things – Ejiofor is now on the cusp of joining the global film-acting elite. He has already been the recipient of scores of year-end critics' awards for 12 Years a Slave, as well as Golden Globe and Bafta nominations – and the industry will view it a significant scandal if an Oscar nomination doesn't materialise on 16 January. Northup is the central figure in McQueen's project to confront the US with its slavery past. The co-author of an 1853 "slave narrative" – subtitled "Narrative of Solomon Northup, a C ...
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Guardian (UK) article
Jerry Stahl With the Skinny on Fatty, Republican Sun Gods, and Happy Mutant Babies
Huffington Post - about 3 years
I first met Jerry Stahl at the Los Angeles Book Fair, back when it was held at UCLA in Westwood, the second happiest place on earth. It was blazing hot, and Jerry was sitting in a booth trying to promote his book, squirming like a bug under a microscope as all the happy peppy people passed by. He looked like something out of a Kafka novel written by William Burroughs, a writer about to be transformed into a junky cockroach. Which is basically how I felt, having been in a booth trying to promote my own book next to Hollywood legend Janet Leigh, who was signing her new memoir, and had a line of adoring fans snaking around the block. While I sat there sweating like an amateur smuggler being interrogated at customs while a hundred bags of junk clogs his colon. Jerry is one of those rare writers who goes between Hollywood screenplays and novels. He writes dark subversive stories and he somehow continues to get away with it. I should, for the sake of full disclosure, admit that he ...
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Huffington Post article
Vote for December's Book Club pick: hard-boiled edition
Yahoo News - about 3 years
Raymond Chandler helped found a genre, lent his work to numerous film adaptations, and had his prose style immortalized in its own adjective. Introducing detective Philip Marlowe (later played by Humphrey Bogart), it helped set the tone for pretty much any noir trope you can name. If you're not in the mood for some gritty Chandler, you can try something from another hard-boiled titan: Dashell Hammett. Jim Thompson was lauded as a sophisticated and unpredictable crime fiction writer, and Savage Night, about a sick and injured hit man sent to kill a prosecutor's star witness, is considered one of his best works.
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Yahoo News article
An Espionage Thriller Set in World War I Era: An Interview with Pulitzer Prize-Winner Robert Olen Butler on His New Novel The Star of Istanbul
Huffington Post - about 3 years
Robert Olen Butler reprises his hardboiled protagonist Kit Cobb from last year's novel The Hot Country for his new espionage gem, The Star of Istanbul (2013). The Pulitzer Prize-winning author has previously cannibalized everything from sci-fi to romance, but lately he's become obsessed by the thriller. Kit Cobb, fresh off covering the American invasion of Mexico as a journalist, is on his way to 1915 war-torn Europe in this one, only now he's working, undercover as a journalist, as a spy for the U.S. government. No noire thriller can do without a dangerous woman, and here it's Selene Bourgani, renowned silent movie actress. As Kit starts falling for her while a passenger on the as yet floating Lusitania, he warns himself, "I needed a war. I needed the whisk of rifle rounds past my ears." For Cobb, falling in love is more dangerous than war. But despite his best intentions, he's headed deeper into the fray of both realms. I caught up with Butler, shortly after he'd received ...
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Huffington Post article
Oliver Tearle: Ten 'Modern' Words With Literary Origins
The Huffington Post - over 3 years
If you think 'totes', 'fangirl', and 'trick out' are recent idioms, then I'm here to surprise you. Elsewhere I have written about some of the literary origins of words more commonly associated these days with the world of social networking. But now I've turned my attention to ten words which have grown in popularity in recent years, but which have literary origins or histories stretching back many decades, and in some cases many centuries. Unless stated otherwise, all citations are to be found in the Oxford English Dictionary (OED). 1. Totes The word 'tote' meaning 'the total amount' is first found in print in a volume of essays from 1772: 'That this was the whole tote of his case is notoriously known.' Meanwhile, 'totes' is recorded from 1887 in the sense of 'total abstainer' in E. J. Mather's book Nor'ard of Dogger: 'The fishermen are all 'totes' (as in total abstainers from alcohol). This is the forerunner to the modern word 'totes,' slang for 'totally,' used as an a ...
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The Huffington Post article
Timeline
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