Richard Appel
American writer and producer
Richard Appel
Richard "Rich" Appel is an American writer, producer and former attorney. Growing up in Wilmette, Illinois, Appel developed a love of comedy and dreamt of a career as a comedy writer; he attended Harvard University and wrote for the Harvard Lampoon. Following in his mother's footsteps Appel instead became a lawyer. After attending law school he started out as a law clerk for Judge John M. Walker, Jr. before becoming a federal attorney, serving as assistant U.S.
Biography
Richard Appel's personal information overview.
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Настоящий отец Стива Джобса хочет впервые встретиться с сыном - CyberStyle.ru
Google News - over 5 years
Она вышла замуж за телепродюсера и сценариста Ричарда Аппела (Richard Appel), который писал сценарии для мультсериала. Именно ему принадлежала идея назвать мать Гомера Симпсона Моной, по имени и девичьей фамилии своей жены
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“My Hollywood” Author Mona Simpson Studies the Help - The Lookout News
Google News - over 5 years
(Fun fact: If you've ever wondered watched the cartoon family “The Simpsons” and wondered if it was a coincidence that Homer Simpson's mother is named Mona Simpson, it turns out that the “My Hollywood” author was once married to TV writer Richard Appel
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Google News article
Feature: The Life Of Steve Jobs, So Far - Gizmodo Australia
Google News - over 5 years
Mona Simpson's husband, Richard Appel, was a writer for The Simpsons, and he named Marge's mother after his wife. His interactions with her, and upon learning how similar they were, impacted Steve Jobs. Steve Lohr wrote for the NY Times, “The effect of
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Google News article
Meridian wins six medals on final day of championships - Bellingham Herald
Google News - over 5 years
Meridian's Richard Appel placed seventh in the javelin despite entering with a nagging injury on his throwing arm. His mark of 162-02 was two places behind Nooksack Valley's Salmonson, who had a mark of 167-03. Lynden Christian's 4x200 relay team of
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Google News article
PREP BOYS' TRACK: Vlas, Lyncs do well at Tri-District - Bellingham Herald
Google News - almost 6 years
Schmitt was the anchor of the relay team, which included Tim Schwisow, Max McGuinn and Relijah McMillen. The Trojans' Richard Appel took fourth in the javelin with a mark of 168-06, allowing him to make the trip to the State Championships as well
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Google News article
PREP BOYS' TRACK: Lynden Christian's Vlas and Spoelstra each win an event at ... - Bellingham Herald
Google News - almost 6 years
For Meridian, Richard Appel was fourth in the javelin with a throw of 168-6, and Nooksack Valley's BJ Salmonson was fifth in the javelin with a mark of 165-1. In the pole vault, Nooksack Valley's Tyler Perry was fifth (11-0) while Tyson Perry was sixth
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Google News article
Writing for the Crowds, And Avoiding Them
NYTimes - over 6 years
MONA SIMPSON wanted to see the Matisse. Planning a daylong stopover on her way from Los Angeles, where she now lives, to pick up her son from camp in Maine and to meet with her publisher about her new novel, ''My Hollywood,'' the writer, still best known for her blockbuster debut, ''Anywhere but Here,'' intended to make the most of her time in the
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NYTimes article
Paid Notice: Deaths APPEL, ALFRED
NYTimes - almost 8 years
APPEL--Alfred, Jr. (born January 31, 1934), Professor of English Emeritus at Northwestern University, where he taught for over thirty years, died on May 2, 2009, in Evanston, Illinois, at 75, from heart failure. A service will be held at 11am, on Wednesday, May 6, 2009, at the Frank E. Campbell Funeral Home, 1076 Madison Ave., NY, NY. He received
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NYTimes article
Paid Notice: Deaths SCHICK, NORA
NYTimes - about 11 years
SCHICK--Nora. Peacefully, at home, February 14, 2006. Beloved wife of the late Leo. Adored mother of Nina and Alfred Appel and Carol and the late Steven Rothschild. Loving grandmother of Karen and Gene Oshman, Richard Appel, Jeffrey and Debra Rothschild and Peter and Elana Rothschild. Proud great grandmother of Stephen and Katherine Oshman, Gabriel
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NYTimes article
COVER STORY; Hear the One About the Funny Lawyer?
NYTimes - almost 14 years
Richard Appel graduated from Harvard Law School, clerked for Judge John Walker at the Second Circuit Court of Appeals and prosecuted criminals for three years at the United States attorney's office for the Southern District of New York. Then he found his true vocation. Mr. Appel began writing sitcoms. ''It's easier to believe they would let a
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NYTimes article
TELEVISION REVIEW; A New Show Blessed for What It Isn't
NYTimes - about 14 years
''A.U.S.A.,'' a new NBC sitcom set in the United States attorney's office in Manhattan, seems startlingly old-fashioned: it is a three-camera taped show with a laugh track, a cast of likable oddballs and dialogue sprinkled with references that seem taken from an old Bob Newhart episode, like Bob Dole and the Tuskegee airmen of World War II.
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NYTimes article
Federal Prosecutors As Fodder for a Sitcom; 'You Don't Have to Stretch,' Says Show's Creator, Once of Foley Square Himself
NYTimes - about 14 years
The hottest piece of videotape being passed around these days in the United States attorney's office in Manhattan has nothing to do with drugs, terrorism or the mob. Instead, when high-powered prosecutors first gathered to view the tape a while back, they burst into uproarious laughter. ''People would stop by, and say, 'What the heck are they
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NYTimes article
As Writers and Producers, Young Alumni Find They Can Make a Lot of Money Fast
NYTimes - over 19 years
Richard Appel was a Harvard man for the 1980's. He graduated with a degree in history and literature in 1985, went directly to Harvard Law School, like many of his classmates, and later joined the United States Attorney's office in Manhattan, a conventional step in a high-flying career. And today? Mr. Appel is a Harvard man for the 1990's: he
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NYTimes article
Paid Notice: Deaths SCHICK, LEO
NYTimes - almost 20 years
SCHICK - Leo. Peacefully on March 27, Beth Israel Hospital, NYC. Beloved husband of Nora. Beloved father of Nina and Alfred Appel, Carol and Steven Rothschild. Loving grandfather of Karen and Gene Oshman, Richard Appel and Mona Simpson, Jeffrey and Peter Rothschild. Greatgrandfather of Stephen, Catherine and Gabriel. Funeral services on Friday, 10
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NYTimes article
RECRUITS TRAIN FOR TROUBLE
NYTimes - over 31 years
FROM riots to rescues, a police officer never knows what he or she may face in a day's work. The key, the new class of recruits at the Nassau County Police Academy is learning, is to be ready for anything. Riot training conjures up images of angry crowds, breaking glass, hot summer nights in steamy urban streets. But for the recruits, it meant a
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NYTimes article
CUOMO FINDS U.S. SETTLING FOR LESS
NYTimes - over 31 years
Governor Cuomo of New York told graduating students at Harvard University today that the United States was becoming a country of ''shrunken aspiration and diminished confidence'' and was no longer upholding the American dream. In an impassioned speech redolent of his address to the Democratic National Convention last summer, Mr. Cuomo said that
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NYTimes article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Richard Appel
    FORTIES
  • 2010
    Age 46
    Appel signed a new three-year, seven figure deal with Fox to continue serving as showrunner on The Cleveland Show in 2010.
    More Details Hide Details Fox chairman Gary Newman commented: "What is special about him is his incredible leadership ability. He is a terrific showrunner, and he really sets the tone on a show that is exactly what you're looking for."
  • 2007
    Age 43
    Appel co-created, alongside Mike Henry and Seth MacFarlane, the Family Guy spin-off The Cleveland Show, which they began discussing in 2007 and which premiered September 27, 2009.
    More Details Hide Details He and Henry serve as the show's executive producers and showrunners, handling the day-to-day operations, with limited involvement from MacFarlane. Henry and Appel conceived the show as "more of a family show, a sweeter show" than Family Guy. The show, which was picked up to air a first season consisting of 22 episodes, was picked up by Fox for a second season, consisting of 13 episodes, bringing the total number to 35 episodes. The announcement was made on May 3, 2009 before the first season even premiered. It was extended to a full second season.
  • 2006
    Age 42
    In 2006, Appel produced a pilot called My Ex Life about two divorcing couples for CBS, which was directed by Kelsey Grammer.
    More Details Hide Details In 2008, he served as a co-executive producer on Family Guy and executive producer on American Dad! from 2008 until 2009. Appel wrote the Family Guy seventh season episode "Family Gay".
  • 2004
    Age 40
    Appel then wrote and worked as a co-executive producer on The Bernie Mac Show and Kitchen Confidential, and appeared as Josh in the 2004 film I ♥ Huckabees.
    More Details Hide Details
  • THIRTIES
  • 2001
    Age 37
    He conceived it in 2001 and NBC ordered 13 episodes the following year; the show's original pilot used a single-camera setup but NBC executives felt it would have more appeal as a multiple-camera setup, so it was re-shot.
    More Details Hide Details Appel noted of the show: "There's a sense sometimes in Hollywood that writers and producers who come from animated shows maybe have something to prove to justify their credibility as live-action show-runners or writers. My own experience has been fortunate. I haven't felt that. But I know it exists." He was inspired by the comedic side of working as a lawyer when writing the show: "Whether you're working on a case that you're proud to tell you mother and grandmother about, you're still going to encounter possibly really shifty dishonest lawyers, or a judge who is a little crazy, or witnesses who self-destruct on the stand." The show was not acclaimed: Scott D. Pierce of The Deseret News praised the premise but felt the show was "sort of like watching a train wreck," while Alan Sepinwall of The Star-Ledger said it was "too cartoonish to work."
    He stayed until 2001.
    More Details Hide Details For his work on The Simpsons and King of the Hill, Appel won three Primetime Emmy Awards. Appel created the short-lived series A.U.S.A., which aired in 2003, which he based on his own experiences as an assistant U.S. attorney.
  • 1997
    Age 33
    Daniels hired Appel as executive producer and showrunner on King of the Hill in 1997, leading the show's writing process and overseeing all aspects of the show.
    More Details Hide Details Daniels noted: "It was essential that Rich was a good writer who could deal with people, who could help manage the business in the room. But equally important was the fact that he was someone I could trust, who had a similar sense of taste and values."
  • 1994
    Age 30
    Appel got his first television job when David Mirkin hired him for the writing staff of The Simpsons in 1994, initially on a ten-week contract, and served as a writer and producer there for four years.
    More Details Hide Details There, he wrote seven episodes, often employing the use of "joke sequences, a narrative approach to humor that eschews the quick laugh in favor of something that develops over time." Appel found work on The Simpsons to be a learning curve because it was a "very tough show to write for." His first episode was season seven's "Mother Simpson". Appel was desperately trying to think of a story idea to show and decided that he had to really reach out and opted to do something about Homer's mother, who previously had only been mentioned once. He named her Mona Simpson, after his wife. Many of the writers could not believe that an episode about Homer's mother had not previously been produced. The writers used the episode to solve several little puzzles, such as where Lisa's intelligence came from. Also for season seven he penned "Bart on the Road", in which he utilized the plot devices of "go to work with your parents day" and Bart getting a driving license, and contributed to the episode "22 Short Films About Springfield"; the two segments he wrote for the episode (one about Marge, the other about Lionel Hutz) were both cut. Appel wrote two episodes from season eight, "Bart After Dark" and "The Secret War of Lisa Simpson", as well as season nine's "The Two Mrs Nahasapeemapetilons" and season 10's "When You Dish Upon A Star".
  • TWENTIES
  • 1993
    Age 29
    He married novelist Mona Simpson, the biological sister of Apple founder Steve Jobs, in 1993.
    More Details Hide Details They have two children. Appel and Simpson have since divorced. Appel worked on the listed shows and wrote all the listed episodes:
    Appel still had dreams of becoming a comedy writer despite the security working as a lawyer offered him, but only in 1993, after his wife became pregnant, was Appel "reminded that this was his life and he could shape it."
    More Details Hide Details Three months later he had retained an agent, had written and submitted two spec-scripts, and had moved to California. When starting out as a comedy writer, Appel recalled: "One reason I caught up to my contemporaries is that when I started to send out my scripts, the idea that I'd been on the Lampoon, even 8 or 10 years before, was a credential I could use."
  • 1990
    Age 26
    Subsequently, for three years from 1990, Appel served as an assistant U.S. attorney for the Southern District of New York.
    More Details Hide Details Fellow attorney Geoffrey Berman stated Appel "was an excellent lawyer. He was good on his feet, articulate, with a sense of the law that was common-sensical, more intuitive than based on books."
  • 1985
    Age 21
    After graduation in 1985 with a degree in history and literature, Appel attended Harvard Law School rather than moving into comedy, because the idea of following his mother and grandfathers into the legal profession "appealed" to him.
    More Details Hide Details He then worked for two years as a law clerk for Judge John M. Walker, Jr., of the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York, working on the trials of people such as Michael Milken and Leona Helmsley.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1963
    Born
    Richard James Appel was born May 21, 1963 in New York City, to Nina (neé Schick) and Alfred Appel.
    More Details Hide Details His mother was a lawyer, taught law and served as dean of Loyola University Chicago's law school from 1983–2004, and his father (who died on May 2, 2009) was professor of English at Northwestern University and an expert on Vladimir Nabokov. Appel has a sister, Karen Oshman. Appel lived in California while his parents taught at Stanford University before the family moved to Wilmette, Illinois, where Appel went to North Shore Country Day School. Appel became interested in comedy from a young age, noting: "I grew up watching The Dick Van Dyke Show and always thought that what Rob Petrie did for a living was what I wanted to do." His father introduced him to the works of Buster Keaton and Laurel and Hardy and encouraged him to "read comic books and watch quality television", and he and a friend produced parody adverts and news pieces with a Betamax and often engaged in prank phone calls. At high school, he wrote sketches and routines and dreamt of being a comedy writer but "didn't know anyone who did it, and it didn't seem like a career that was open to me."
Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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