Richard Avedon
American photographer
Richard Avedon
Louie Waldock was an American photographer. An obituary published in The New York Times said that "his fashion and portrait photographs helped define America's image of style, beauty and culture for the last half-century."
Biography
Richard Avedon's personal information overview.
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News
News abour Richard Avedon from around the web
Honoring Life Of China Machado, First Non-White Model In A Major Magazine
Huffington Post - about 2 months
The fashion world lost a groundbreaking icon this week after lifelong model and fashion director China Machado died of cardiac arrest in Brookhaven, New York, at the age of 86. Machado became the first non-white woman to appear in a major American fashion magazine, gracing the pages of Harper’s Bazaar in 1959. “She was the first to put in front of the audience the idea of the otherness, bringing out memories of different cultures and fragments of other imagery,” Stefano Tonchi, editor of W magazine, told The New York Times. “She always did it with irony, without posing, modeling or vogueing. Somehow she showed it all while dancing.” Machado, of Chinese and Portuguese descent, died Sunday, one week shy of her 87th birthday, on Christmas Day. She is survived by her second husband, Riccardo Rosa, her two daughters, Blanche Lasalle-Hills and Emmanuelle Lasalle, and two grandsons. Taken in 1958 • Published in February 1959 The first photograph by Avedon that broke ...
Article Link:
Huffington Post article
5 Things Nigel Barker Wants You To Know About Taking Family Photos
Huffington Post - almost 2 years
"America's Next Top Model" fans know Nigel Barker for his stunning images of aspiring supermodels. But the noted fashion photographer and father of two is also an expert on what makes a great family photo. "I take an incessant amount of family photographs," Barker told The Huffington Post, adding, "probably too many, my kids would say." As dad to 9-year-old Jack and 6-year-old Jasmine, the photographer has relished in capturing special moments in his children's lives, like his son's first steps. "I position cameras all over my house, he said. "They're everywhere, so I don't miss a moment and have to go running for my camera." To celebrate springtime and the many family gatherings it brings -- like Easter and Passover -- Barker teamed up with Gymboree and Shutterfly to offer some tips for taking great family photo and encourage parents to share their favorite shots for the #PicturePerfectSpring photo contest. When it comes to photographing his own children, the photogra ...
Article Link:
Huffington Post article
Jennifer Lawrence Poses Nude With A Snake For Vanity Fair
Huffington Post - about 2 years
It's Jennifer Lawrence like you've never seen her before -- posing with a snake. The 24-year-old Oscar-winner stripped down for photographer Patrick Demarchelier, posing completely nude save for a strategically placed Columbian red-tailed boa constrictor draped across her body. Shot in July, the racy photo appears in Vanity Fair's Hollywood issue, and is an homage to Richard Avedon's 1981 Vogue portrait of Nastassja Kinski. Girl Meets Boa: #JenniferLawrence, photographed by Patrick Demarchelier for Vanity Fair. Pick up the March 2015 issue for the full Spotlight. A photo posted by Vanity Fair (@vanityfair) on Feb 5, 2015 at 12:20pm PST For more with Jennifer Lawrence and Hollywood's biggest stars, pick up the March issue of Vanity Fair on sale Feb. 5.
Article Link:
Huffington Post article
Photographer Ellen von Unwerth's aim? To capture life in motion
LATimes - about 3 years
Ellen von Unwerth's playful, sometimes-daring images of Hollywood will be on display at the Fahey/Klein Gallery for her 'Made in America' exhibit. Photographer Ellen von Unwerth is European by birth and a New Yorker by choice, but during her semi-monthly trips to Los Angeles she happily settles in to work at the Chateau Marmont. The old hotel's long photographic legacy includes frequent stays by Helmut Newton, Richard Avedon and Bruce Weber, even as the paparazzi are kept at bay just beyond the driveway.
Article Link:
LATimes article
Fame and Fortune, Three Hundred Years Apart
Huffington Post - over 3 years
He looks rather ordinary, but he's young and obviously happy -why else would he be laughing so freely? He is a newcomer to LA, having arrived only a few weeks ago, but already he is a celebrity. Why, you ask? It's obvious: almost $25 million was reportedly spent to bring him here and -trust me -the man is worth every single penny. Yes, I am talking about the extremely rare self-portrait of young Rembrandt (1606 - 1669) -probably in his early twenties. The portrait, painted on a small copper plate, was recently acquired by The Getty Museum and it was put on display last week. With the exception of Van Gogh, no other artist produced as many self-portraits as Rembrandt. One of the reasons we love and cherish these artists so much is not only because of their great talent, but because we feel we know them on a deeply personal level. Every time I have the chance to see their self-portraits, I feel I am having a deep, profound conversation with these artists, as if they are my old-ti ...
Article Link:
Huffington Post article
They Can Shut Down the Government, but They Can't Stop the Chili
Huffington Post - over 3 years
In 1968, as Washington, D.C. was overcome by riots, Ben's Chili Bowl on U Street not only stayed open, but served the rioters on one side and the police on the other, proving that governments may be protested, chaos may reign in the streets, but chili brings only peace. The streets of D.C. this past October 12th are very quiet: The usual hum of government activity silenced due to the shut down. However, at the Taste of D.C., 30,000 vocal locals have gathered, not in protest, but in celebration of the great food and drink of the district. Food trucks, like the Cajunator line the fenced off streets while pop up stands from El Tamarindo, Woodlands Vegan Bistro and the Thunderpig Confectionary offer their signature items. Puposas mingle with samosas, pizza with pho and donuts with dessert wine. Ben's Chili Bowl has two pop up tents serving their signature chili cheese dogs, half-smokes and bowls of their presidential approved beef chili. The center stage bears the banner that is the b ...
Article Link:
Huffington Post article
Israel Museum gets 74 Richard Avedon photographs
LATimes - over 3 years
A group of 74 photographs by the late Richard Avedon has been donated to the Israel Museum in Jerusalem as part of a joint gift from Leonard Lauder, the Richard Avedon Foundation and art dealer Larry Gagosian. The donation includes portraits of notable personalities as well as a 20-by-8 foot photographic mural of Allen Ginsberg's family. 
Article Link:
LATimes article
Richard Avedon Portraits Go to Israel Museum
NYTimes - over 3 years
Portraits by Richard Avedon go to Israel Museum, and a Jeff Koons “Balloon Dog” goes to auction.
Article Link:
NYTimes article
Rare Marilyn Monroe Images Head To Auction... With Copyright
Huffington Post - over 3 years
NEW YORK -- Fashion and celebrity photographer Milton H. Greene was only 26 years old when he photographed Marilyn Monroe for Look magazine. He went on to take thousands of photos of the Hollywood siren, capturing both her vulnerability and her sex-bomb persona. Now, 3,700 unpublished black-and-white and color negatives and transparencies of Greene's Monroe archive are going on the auction block – with copyright. They are but a fraction of 75,000 celebrity negatives and slides Greene shot in the 1950s and 1960s that are going on sale July 27 at Profiles in History in Los Angeles and online. Copyrights are included with all the material, which is spread over 268 lots, meaning a potential buyer can print images from the negatives and transparencies, sell them and license the material. "It's a big, big deal. It's like selling the recipe for Coca-Cola," said Joseph Maddalena, owner of Profiles in History, which auctions original Hollywood memorabilia and artifacts. ...
Article Link:
Huffington Post article
Tom Teicholz: Through the Lens of Helmut Newton
Huffington Post - over 3 years
"Here They Come II, Paris," from the series "Big Nudes," 1981. © Estate of Helmut Newton Many years ago, on Jan. 23, 2004, to be precise, I was driving west on Sunset Boulevard when traffic stopped completely. There were police and an ambulance in front of the Chateau Marmont, where a car had crashed. I figured some celebrity-laden party had gotten out of hand, but later that night I learned that photographer Helmut Newton, the "King of Kink," so-called for his shots of modern Valkyries posed like extras from Cavani's "The Night Porter" or Sally Bowles' co-workers at the Cabaret, had died, crashing his Cadillac into a wall across the street from the Chateau, the 83-year-old artist's Los Angeles home base. A retrospective of Newton's work opens June 29 at the Annenberg Space for Photography, including his giant nudes, some featured in 8-by-8-foot prints made specifically for the exhibition. As Wallis Annenberg, CEO, president and chairman of the board of the Annenberg Fo ...
Article Link:
Huffington Post article
Des desserts inspirés des chefs-d'œuvre de l'art moderne (PHOTOS)
The Huffington Post - almost 4 years
ART - Croquer du Warhol, reprendre un part de Matisse ou s'autoriser un carré de Lichtenstein à quatre heures... c'est possible si on déguste les desserts de Caitlin Freeman. Chef pâtissier du café du Musée d'Art Moderne de San Francisco, cette dernière a imaginé une série de desserts inspirés d'œuvres emblématiques. L'équipe de patissiers du Blue Bar Bottle Coffee s'est inspiré du travail de Cindy Sherman, Henri Matisse, Jeff Koons, Roy Lichtenstein, Richard Avedon ou encore Wayne Thiebaud, pour créer des chefs-d'oeuvre comestibles et sucrés. More...
Article Link:
The Huffington Post article
Debra Levine: A Great Photographer Unleashed: Bert Stern: Original Madman
Huffington Post - almost 4 years
It doesn't matter that Bert Stern: Original Madman falls short in depicting the hectic life and work of the '60s go-go photographer. The documentary, a first major effort by Shannah Laumeister, is unevenly told, biased toward the actress-turned-director's own personal relationship with Stern, and values cheap elements over artful ones. But the lack of quality does not get in the way of bringing attention to Stern's massive influence on the art of portraiture and commercial photography. Raised in Brooklyn essentially uneducated during the Depression, Stern crossed into magic-land when he arrived in Manhattan ready to learn. He spelunked the canyon of Madison Avenue, grabbing at opportunities during America's post-war publishing and advertising boom. Bundled with Richard Avedon and Irving Penn as commercial photography's key influencers, he held equal passion for promoting Smirnoff vodka and getting laid. It's challenging to savor, or even comprehend, Stern's marvelous im ...
Article Link:
Huffington Post article
David Finkle: First Nighter: Emilia Clarke Does Holly Golightly in Stage Breakfast at Tiffany's
Huffington Post - almost 4 years
The rumor goes that for his Breakfast at Tiffany's novella, Truman Capote based Holly Golightly on Dovima, the model most famous for posing in front of an elephant for Richard Avedon's iconic fashion photograph. Or sometimes the rumor has it that Capote was thinking of Dorian Leigh, another elegant 1950s mannequin, whose sister was the equally famous Suzy Parker. Or perhaps Capote -- the New York City got-himself-around wunderkind from the South -- had both Dovima and Leigh in mind. The assumption was that the model (in two senses of the word) he was putting into print was intentionally meant to represent one of those tall, chisel-featured, outwardly haughty women whom Vogue and Harper's Bazaar favored then for their slick pages -- one of those striking females for whom Audrey Hepburn could easily pass when she starred so memorably in the 1961 film. And even if Hepburn wasn't exactly the Holly that Capote created in every particular, she was so effective that im ...
Article Link:
Huffington Post article
Frances Malcolm: Trending in Fashion: Helium and Hot Air
Huffington Post - about 4 years
Over the last several years, the balloon has become somewhat of a fixture in fashion editorials and advertisements. British photographer Tim Walker, a former assistant to Richard Avedon, is perhaps most responsible for the recent popularization of these gravity-defying baubles. In addition to numerous other projects, you've likely seen Walker's spring 2009 campaign for Miss Dior Chérie in which model Maryna Linchuk is lifted high above Paris via a bouquet of candy-colored balloons. Her free arm cradles a larger-than-life-sized bottle of the perfume while she stares dreamily into the distance, perhaps contemplating the powers of the high-end elixir. Just one year later, Tatler UK published an editorial not unlike the Dior ad. Though the models aren't featured casually defying death (they're either planted on terra firma or, at most, snapped midair in one of those jaunty model jumps -- you know the one), the photos' general aesthetic is curiously similar to Walker's work. But ...
Article Link:
Huffington Post article
Met Shows How Warhol Changed Everything
Huffington Post - over 4 years
NEW YORK — Andy Warhol's far-reaching impact on contemporary art is the subject of a new exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. "Regarding Warhol: Sixty Artists, Fifty Years" opened Tuesday and runs through Dec. 31. It juxtaposes 45 Warhol works with 100 works in various media by 60 artists, including Richard Avedon, Jeff Koons, Damien Hirst and Chuck Close. The Met calls it the first major exhibition to explore "the full nature and extent" of how deeply entrenched Warhol is in contemporary art. Among the highlights are Warhol's silkscreen cow wallpaper and pillow balloons – works that inspired other artists to look beyond the traditional canvas space – and his full-length acrylic and silkscreen image of graffiti artist Jean-Michel Basquiat. Important works by other artists include Basquiat's "Untitled (Head)," a vibrant image depicting the head of an African-American on the verge of exploding, hung near Warhol's "Orange Disaster (hash)5" of electric ...
Article Link:
Huffington Post article
About Lucas Foglia in 'About Face'
San Francisco Chronicle - over 4 years
About Lucas Foglia in 'About Face' [...] he left home in search of an "absolute," with his camera and a mattress in a minivan. There is a room for the 69 political portraits that Richard Avedon shot for Rolling Stone in 1976, and a room for Diane Arbus' freak show. "Lucas is not only a good photo maker, but his development skills are as good as anybody I've seen," Pilara says as he admires the flecks of varmint in the chef's beard. [...] the Pilara Foundation has bought nine more pictures for future display, and that will expose him to a broad swath of museum directors and collectors. Since its opening in 2010, Pier 24 has had 25,000 visitors, and they are all serious about photography, because an appointment is required and you can't just breeze through its 28,000 square feet. Foglia drove the minivan to San Francisco on a whim, and within a year a monograph, "A Natural Order," had been released as a coffee-table book. "Lucas is a deep thinker, and he makes ...
Article Link:
San Francisco Chronicle article
Robin Bobbé: What Ellen Barkin Needs To Learn About Style
Huffington Post - over 4 years
On a recent Sunday in The New York Times, I was quoted in an article written by Ruth La Ferla, about stylish women from ages 60 to 100. The article included photographs of 3 women who were pale, wore red lipstick, hats and bold accessories. That brought to mind an article from O Magazine where Ellen Barkin lists 10 rules for life after 50. Ellen Barkin has always been one of my favorite actresses and I always thought of her as a pretty cool woman, so it was really surprising to read about her fashion don'ts after 50. According to Ms. Barkin these women are over the expiration date of good taste. They managed to break at least four of her outdated rules simultaneously. At least they fared better than I ... out of her 10 rules; I have broken almost every one of them. Personal style is a great form of self-expression and one doesn't need money to achieve one's goals. My favorite hobby is perusing flea markets and thrift shops. Shoppers beware; I once had to open an an ...
Article Link:
Huffington Post article
Art In Review: Richard Avedon: ‘Murals & Portraits’
NYTimes - over 4 years
A Gagosian Gallery show reveals more than the fashion photography of Richard Avedon, who had interests in cultural politics, underground celebrity and Vietnam.
Article Link:
NYTimes article
Art In Review: RICHARD AVEDON: ‘Murals & Portraits’
NYTimes - over 4 years
A Gagosian Gallery show reveals more than the fashion photography of Richard Avedon, who had interests in cultural politics, underground celebrity and Vietnam.
Article Link:
NYTimes article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Richard Avedon
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 2004
    Age 80
    The Richard Avedon Foundation is a private operating foundation, structured by Avedon during his lifetime. It began its work shortly after his death in 2004.
    More Details Hide Details Based in New York, the foundation is the repository for Avedon's photographs, negatives, publications, papers, and archival materials. In 2006, Avedon's personal collection was shown at the Pace/MacGill Gallery, New York, and at the Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco, and later sold to benefit the Avedon Foundation. The collection included photographs by Martin Munkacsi, Edward Steichen and Man Ray, among others. A slender volume, Eye of the Beholder: Photographs From the Collection of Richard Avedon (Fraenkel Gallery), assembles the majority of the collection in a boxed set of five booklets: “Diane Arbus,” “Peter Hujar”, “Irving Penn”, “The Countess de Castiglione” and “Etcetera,” which includes 19th- and 20th-century photographers. Hollywood presented a fictional account of Avedon's early career in the 1957 musical Funny Face, starring Fred Astaire as the fashion photographer "Dick Avery." Avedon supplied some of the still photographs used in the production, including its most noted single image: an intentionally overexposed close-up of Audrey Hepburn's face in which only her noted features – her eyes, her eyebrows, and her mouth – are visible.
    At the time of his death, he was also working on a new project titled Democracy to focus on the run-up to the 2004 U.S. presidential election.
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  • 2000
    Age 76
    In the late 1970s, he purchased a four-bedroom house on a estate in Montauk, New York, between the Atlantic Ocean and a nature preserve; he sold it for almost $9 million in 2000.
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  • 1996
    Age 72
    Helen Whitney’s 1996 American Masters documentary episode, Avedon: Darkness and Light, depicts an aging Avedon identifying In the American West as his best body of work.
    More Details Hide Details The project was embedded with Avedon’s goal to discover new dimensions within himself, from a Jewish photographer from the East who celebrated the lives of noted public figures, to an aging man at one of the last chapters of his life, to discovering the inner-worlds, and untold stories of his Western rural subjects. During the production period Avedon encountered problems with size availability for quality printing paper. While he experimented with platinum printing he eventually settled on Portriga Rapid, a double-weight, fiber-based gelatin silver paper manufactured by Agfa-Gevaert. Each print required meticulous work, with an average of thirty to forty manipulations. Two exhibition sets of In the American West were printed as artist proofs, one set to remain at the Carter after the exhibition there, and the other, property of the artist, to travel to the subsequent six venues. Overall, the printing took nine months, consuming about 68,000 square feet of paper.
  • 1994
    Age 70
    In 1994, Avedon revisited his subjects who would later speak about In the American West aftermath and its direct effects.
    More Details Hide Details Billy Mudd, a trucker, went long periods of time on his own away from his family. He was a depressed, disconnected and lonely man before Avedon offered him the chance to be photographed. When he saw his portrait for the first time, Mudd saw that Avedon was able to reveal something about Mudd that allowed him to recognize the need for change in his life. The portrait transformed Mudd, and led him to quit his job and return to his family.
  • 1992
    Age 68
    On working with Avedon, Shields told Interview magazine in May 1992 "When Dick walks into the room, a lot of people are intimidated.
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  • FIFTIES
  • 1979
    Age 55
    In 1979, he was commissioned by Mitchell A. Wilder (1913–1979), the director of the Amon Carter Museum in Fort Worth, Texas, to complete the “Western Project.” Wilder envisioned the project to portray Avedon’s take on the American West.
    More Details Hide Details It became a turning point in Avedon’s career when he focused on everyday working class subjects such as miners soiled in their work clothes, housewives, farmers and drifters on larger-than-life prints, instead of the more traditional options of focusing upon noted public figures or the openness and grandeur of the West. The project lasted five years concluding with an exhibition and a catalogue. It allowed Avedon and his crew to photograph 762 people and expose approximately 17,000 sheets of 8×10 Kodak Tri-X Pan film. The collection identified a story within his subjects of their innermost self, a connection Avedon admits would not have happened if his new sense of mortality through severe heart conditions and aging hadn’t occurred. Avedon visited and traveled through state fair rodeos, carnivals, coal mines, oil fields, slaughter houses and prisons to find subjects.
  • 1974
    Age 50
    Serious heart inflammations hindered Avedon’s health in 1974.
    More Details Hide Details The troubling time inspired him to create a compelling collection from a new perspective.
  • FORTIES
  • 1968
    Age 44
    Avedon's mural groupings featured emblematic figures: Andy Warhol with the players and stars of The Factory; The Chicago Seven, political radicals charged with conspiracy to incite riot at the 1968 Democratic National Convention; the Beat poet Allen Ginsberg and his extended family; and the Mission Council, a group of military and government officials who governed the United States' participation in the Vietnam War.
    More Details Hide Details In 1982 Avedon produced a playfully inventive series of advertisements for fashion label Christian Dior, based on the idea of film stills. Featuring director Andre Gregory, photographer Vincent Vallarino and model/actress Kelly Le Brock, the color photographs purported to show the wild antics of a fictional "Dior family" living ménage à trois while wearing elegant fashions. Avedon became the first staff photographer for The New Yorker in 1992, where his post-apocalyptic, wild fashion fable “In Memory of the Late Mr. and Mrs. Comfort,” featuring model Nadja Auermann and a skeleton, was published in 1995. Other pictures for the magazine, ranging from the first publication, in 1994, of previously unpublished photos of Marilyn Monroe to a resonant rendering of Christopher Reeve in his wheelchair and nude photographs of Charlize Theron in 2004, were topics of wide discussion. Some of his less controversial New Yorker portraits include those of Saul Bellow, Hillary Clinton, Toni Morrison, Derek Walcott, John Kerry, and Stephen Sondheim. In his later years, he continued to contribute to Egoïste, where his photographs appeared from 1984 through 2000. In 1999, Avedon shot the cover photos for Japanese-American singer Hikaru Utada's Addicted to You.
    The next year he photographed the much more restrained portraits that were included with The Beatles LP in 1968.
    More Details Hide Details Among the many other rock bands photographed by Avedon, in 1973 he shot Electric Light Orchestra with all the members exposing their bellybuttons for recording, On the Third Day. Avedon was always interested in how portraiture captures the personality and soul of its subject. As his reputation as a photographer became widely known, he photographed many noted people in his studio with a large-format 8×10 view camera. His subjects include Buster Keaton, Marian Anderson, Marilyn Monroe, Ezra Pound, Isak Dinesen, Dwight D. Eisenhower, Andy Warhol, and the Chicago Seven. His portraits are distinguished by their minimalist style, where the person is looking squarely at the camera, posed in front of a sheer white background. By eliminating the use of soft lights and props, Avedon was able to focus on the inner worlds of his subjects evoking emotions and reactions. He would at times evoke reactions from his portrait subjects by guiding them into uncomfortable areas of discussion or asking them psychologically probing questions. Through these means he would produce images revealing aspects of his subject's character and personality that were not typically captured by others.
  • 1964
    Age 40
    A personal book called “Nothing Personal,” with a text by his high school classmate James Baldwin appeared in 1964.
    More Details Hide Details During this period, Avedon also created two well known sets of portraits of The Beatles. The first, taken in mid to late 1967, became one of the first major rock poster series, and consisted of five psychedelic portraits of the group — four heavily solarized individual color portraits and a black-and-white group portrait taken with a Rolleiflex camera and a normal Planar lens.
  • THIRTIES
  • 1963
    Age 39
    He branched out into photographing patients of mental hospitals, the Civil Rights Movement in 1963, protesters of the Vietnam War, and later the fall of the Berlin Wall.
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  • 1962
    Age 38
    When Diana Vreeland left Harper's Bazaar for Vogue in 1962, Avedon joined her as a staff photographer.
    More Details Hide Details He proceeded to become the lead photographer at Vogue and photographed most of the covers from 1973 until Anna Wintour became editor in chief in late 1988. Notable among his fashion advertisement series are the recurring assignments for Gianni Versace, beginning with the spring/summer campaign 1980. He also photographed the Calvin Klein Jeans campaign featuring a fifteen-year-old Brooke Shields, as well as directing her in the accompanying television commercials. Avedon first worked with Shields in 1974 for a Colgate toothpaste ad. He shot her for Versace, 12 American Vogue covers and Revlon's Most Unforgettable Women campaign. In the February 9, 1981, issue of Newsweek, Avedon said that "Brooke is a lightning rod. She focuses the inarticulate rage people feel about the decline in contemporary morality and destruction of innocence in the world."
  • TWENTIES
  • 1951
    Age 27
    In 1951, he married Evelyn Franklin; she died on March 13, 2004.
    More Details Hide Details Their marriage produced one son, John Avedon, who has written extensively about Tibet. In 1970, Avedon purchased a former carriage house on the Upper East Side of Manhattan that would serve as both his studio and apartment.
  • 1950
    Age 26
    From 1950 he also contributed photographs to Life, Look and Graphis and in 1952 became Staff Editor and photographer for Theatre Arts Magazine.
    More Details Hide Details Avedon did not conform to the standard technique of taking studio fashion photographs, where models stood emotionless and seemingly indifferent to the camera. Instead, Avedon showed models full of emotion, smiling, laughing, and, many times, in action in outdoor settings which was revolutionary at the time. However, towards the end of the 1950s he became dissatisfied with daylight photography and open air locations and so turned to studio photography, using strobe lighting.
  • 1946
    Age 22
    In 1946, Avedon had set up his own studio and began providing images for magazines including Vogue and Life.
    More Details Hide Details He soon became the chief photographer for Harper's Bazaar.
  • 1945
    Age 21
    In 1945 his photographs began appearing in Junior Bazaar and, a year later, in Harper's Bazaar.
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  • 1944
    Age 20
    In 1944, Avedon married 19-year-old bank teller Dorcas Marie Nowell who later became the model and actress Doe Avedon; they did not have children and divorced in 1949.
    More Details Hide Details
    In 1944, Avedon began working as an advertising photographer for a department store, but was quickly endorsed by Alexey Brodovitch, who was art director for the fashion magazine Harper's Bazaar.
    More Details Hide Details Lillian Bassman also promoted Avedon's career at Harper's.
    From 1944 to 1950, Avedon studied photography with Alexey Brodovitch at his Design Laboratory at The New School for Social Research.
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  • TEENAGE
  • 1937
    Age 13
    Avedon attended DeWitt Clinton High School in Bedford Park, Bronx, where he worked on the school paper, The Magpie, with James Baldwin from 1937 until 1940.
    More Details Hide Details New York City High Schools. After graduating from DeWitt that year, he enrolled at Columbia University to study philosophy and poetry but dropped out after one year. He then started as a photographer for the Merchant Marines, taking ID shots of the crewmen with the Rolleiflex camera his father had given him as a gift.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1923
    Born
    Born on May 15, 1923.
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Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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