Richard Ney
American actor
Richard Ney
Richard Maximillian Ney was an American actor and investment counselor. He was born in New York City, the son of Rebie Margaret (Flood) and Erwin Maximillian Ney. He was the grandson of the Rev. Theodore L. Flood, editor of The Chautauquan. He is the father of Rick Dufay, former guitarist for Aerosmith, and the grandfather of actress Minka Kelly.
Biography
Richard Ney's personal information overview.
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News
News abour Richard Ney from around the web
Man charged with two murders pleads - Salina Journal
Google News - over 5 years
Prosecution of the case was delayed for a year after Watson's original attorney, Julie McKenna, was found to have a conflict and was disqualified from representing him. Attorneys Richard Ney and Laura Shaneyfelt, of Wichita, took over Watson's
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The Corner - Coon Rapids Herald
Google News - over 5 years
People like Joe Kennedy, Art Cutten, Bernard Baruch, Gerald Loeb and much later on, Richard Ney were among those in high ranks of tape readers. Loeb once said, “In my opinion, far and away the most important thing to master in Wall Street is the tape
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The Greatest Hollywood Director You May Never Have Heard Of - Huffington Post (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Meanwhile, their eldest son, Vin (Richard Ney), romances village beauty Carol (Teresa Wright), despite less-than-ideal circumstances. Even though the air war takes a toll on their village and home, nothing dampens the spirit of this dignified family
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Rulings made for murder trial - Salina.com
Google News - over 5 years
She denied a motion by Richard Ney and Laura Shaneyfelt, who represent Watson, alleging that the notice -- which was signed by then-Attorney General Steve Six -- should be dismissed because it was not signed by Saline County Attorney Ellen Mitchell
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Gunsmith's information can be admitted at Salina murder trial - Salina.com
Google News - over 5 years
Attorney Richard Ney, who represents Watson, argued that failure to preserve the six-person photo lineup shown to Thiel amounted to "deliberate destruction of evidence." Kansas Assistant Attorney General Steven Karrer argued that the records Burr kept
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Judge to consider allowing man's testimony - Salina Journal
Google News - almost 6 years
Attorney Richard Ney, who represents Watson, argued that KBI agents who interviewed Ward on Dec. 2, 2008, and Feb. 24, 2009, used tactics that were "worse, frankly" than brutality. "This was not the iron fist; this was the velvet glove," Ney said
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THE OSCARS; They Really Like Me
NYTimes - about 7 years
ONLY three men (and, needless to say, no women) have won more than two Oscars for directing: Frank Capra, John Ford and William Wyler. A look at their winners -- all have been issued on home video, though ''The Best Years of Our Lives'' is out of print -- suggests how the taste of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences has developed since
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NYTimes article
Richard Ney, Financial Adviser, Popular Author and Actor, 87
NYTimes - over 12 years
Richard Ney, an investment adviser and best-selling author on finance whose earlier career, in films, led to a brief, stormy marriage to the screen star Greer Garson, died on Sunday at his home in Pasadena, Calif. He was 87. The cause was heart disease, said his wife, Mei-Lee Ney. Mr. Ney, who grew up in New York, had an economics degree from
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AT THE MOVIES; Reflections On All 200 Films
NYTimes - almost 15 years
Don't try to stump Christopher Lee. The towering, aristocratic British actor, best known for his epicurean interpretation of Count Dracula in the Hammer horror films of the 1960's, has appeared in well over 200 feature films. Mr. Lee is unsure of the exact figure, though he says he remembers something about each of them. ''In England, they brought
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Keep Pumping Those Pedals
NYTimes - almost 16 years
To the Editor: Lee Iacocca, the president of the company that makes E-Bikes, recommends electric bicycles for those boomers who are ''nervous to go out with their kids and grandkids because they haven't been on a two-wheeler in years.'' Well, I say, Get over your nervous tendencies and get out on a real bicycle! You'll strengthen your legs and
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A Final Weekend of Campaign Thrust and Parry; The Nader Question
NYTimes - over 16 years
To the Editor: In ''Al Gore in the Home Stretch'' (editorial, Nov. 3), you chide Ralph Nader for his ''willingness to throw the election to Mr. Bush'' and his dismissal of a threat to the Supreme Court that would stem from a Bush victory. Yet had Mr. Nader been allowed to debate, Mr. Gore could have smoked out these and other apparent flaws in Mr.
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MOVIES: CRITIC'S CHOICE
NYTimes - over 16 years
THE world is still waiting for Judy Davis to give a bad performance. Even in an irreverently funny but off-kilter movie like Peter Duncan's CHILDREN OF THE REVOLUTION (1996), she's joy to behold. Her character is an eager young pro-Communist Australian with the chance of a lifetime: a trip to the Soviet Union to meet Stalin. Things get cozy, and
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BOOKS IN BRIEF: NONFICTION
NYTimes - about 18 years
A Rose for Mrs. Miniver The Life of Greer Garson. By Michael Troyan. University Press of Kentucky, $25. Although Greer Garson once called herself ''The little girl least likely to succeed,'' her single-minded pursuit of stardom earned her, while she was still a beginner on the London stage, the nickname Ca-Reer Garson, Michael Troyan writes in his
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MOVIES THIS WEEK
NYTimes - over 18 years
UNUSUAL protagonists propel the better films on television this week: a British matron during the Nazi blitzkrieg, a girl in mortal fear of her uncle, a Protestant minister and a runaway princess. William Wyler's MRS. MINIVER (1942), a brilliantly rounded portrait of an English family during World War II, is a moving tribute to love and valor,
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Job Climate Improves With More Public Transit; Cycling to Work
NYTimes - about 19 years
To the Editor: ''Poor Without Cars Find Trek to Work Is Now a Job''(front page, Nov. 18) neglects to mention bicycles as a viable form of transportation. In fact, the article denigrates bicycles by citing only the hapless dishwashers riding along Main Street in Mount Kisco, N.Y. on their ''rusty bicycles.'' Bicycles are used by millions around the
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Great Performances
NYTimes - almost 20 years
To the Editor: While Oscars were being handed out in Hollywood, Vice President Al Gore was performing in faraway China (front page, March 25 and 26). There he kept the news media at bay as he reluctantly toasted Prime Minister Li Peng over multimillion-dollar business deals between China and Boeing and General Motors. Then Mr. Gore gave a
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Greer Garson, 92, Actress, Dies; Won Oscar for 'Mrs. Miniver'
NYTimes - almost 21 years
Greer Garson, the actress who epitomized a noble, wise and courageous wife in some of the sleekest and most sentimental American movies of the 1940's, died yesterday morning at Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas. She was 92. Miss Garson, who had a history of heart problems, had lived at the long-term-care hospital for the last three years, according
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Choice Films on TV
NYTimes - about 35 years
'Ruggles of Red Gap' For something disarming and different in the field of gentle satire, catch Leo McCarey's ''Ruggles of Red Gap'' (1935), showing Tuesday at midnight on Channel 13. In this fond, funny serving of Americana, an imported British butler reluctantly, then proudly adjusts to the crude but hearty spirit of a turn-of-the-century
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Richard Ney
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 2004
    Age 87
    Died on July 18, 2004.
    More Details Hide Details
  • FIFTIES
  • 1970
    Age 53
    The first of these, The Wall Street Jungle, was a New York Times bestseller in 1970.
    More Details Hide Details The second and third are The Wall Street Gang and Making It in the Market. He has a stepdaughter named Marcia McMartin.
  • FORTIES
  • 1958
    Age 41
    Ney's one Broadway venture was the 1958 musical Portofino, which he produced and for which he wrote the book and lyrics.
    More Details Hide Details It closed after three performances. He acted mostly in television with occasional film roles until the mid-1960s, by which time he had successfully transitioned to a career as an investment counselor. He wrote three highly critical books about Wall Street, asserting that the market was manipulated by market makers to the detriment of the average investor.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1916
    Born
    Born on November 12, 1916.
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