Richard Taylor
Confederate Army general
Richard Taylor
Richard Taylor was a Confederate general in the American Civil War. He was the son of United States President Zachary Taylor and First Lady Margaret Taylor.
Biography
Richard Taylor's personal information overview.
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Easton police arrest man on second-offense drunken driving charge - Enterprise News
Google News - over 5 years
Richard Taylor of 679 Washington St., was treated by the Fire Department for a minor injury following the accident, which occurred at 10:45 pm Wednesday, police said. Police said Taylor was driving a white Ford pickup truck east on Depot Street went
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'Birdman' took flight 100 years ago - Topeka Capital Journal
Google News - over 5 years
Richard Taylor, who organized a 90th anniversary celebration of the flight on Sept. 2, 2001. Taylor, who now lives in Andover, said he doesn't know of any celebrations planned to mark the 100th anniversary. In 1999, a sign was put up just east of SE
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Independent podcast: Richard Taylor - The Independent
Google News - over 5 years
Richard Taylor and David Wood's musicalisation of LP Hartley's The Go-Between for the West Yorkshire Playhouse marks a further departure in the development of that many-faceted genre we call musical theatre
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Cyclists ride for Rwanda - BCLocalNews
Google News - over 5 years
Ed Lifton shares a laugh with Richard Taylor, one of the founders of the Wellspring Foundation, at last year's Lake2Lake Ride, a fundraiser for Wellspring. Cyclists from across North America will converge in the Okanagan this fall to participate in the
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Arizona high school football 2011: Centennial seeks to return to the top - AZ Central.com
Google News - over 5 years
25, 2011 04:41 PM Peoria Centennial football coach Richard Taylor has his seniors establish the goals for each season. It's no surprise what came back this week: Win the state championship. The behemoths on the offensive line aren't there like they
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School bus driver gets jail time in connection with deadly crash - WFMZ Allentown
Google News - over 5 years
Moments before, a judge sentenced him to one to two years in prison for the death of Richard Taylor on February 17, 2010. The Schwenksvile, Montgomery County, man was driving a school bus filled with 46 students to Perkiomen Valley Middle School. ... -
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Local lads to star in new musical - Belper News
Google News - over 5 years
Derby LIVE will be presenting the show, in a co-production with West Yorkshire Playhouse and Royal & Derngate, from October 6-29, with words and music by David Wood and Richard Taylor. 'The past is a foreign country, they do things differently there'
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My Passion with Richard Taylor: Book that unlocks the secrets contained in ... - Yorkshire Post
Google News - over 5 years
Churches have always been fascinating places to me. They speak volumes, not just about faith and history but about ourselves as we were and are today. There are few places as rich as a church when it comes to finding meaning in their glass, metal,
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Denton Man Arrested for Arson - WBOC TV 16
Google News - over 5 years
Twenty-three-year-old Richard Taylor Chapline is charged with first- and second-degree arson and first-degree malicious burning. The Maryland State Fire Marshal's Office said the incident occurred at around 12:30 am at a 2-and-a-half story house
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Players, coaches, families come together in rough economy to get to high ... - AZ Central.com
Google News - over 5 years
Every year coach Richard Taylor takes players from all three levels to Concordia University in Irvine, Calif., for a preseason camp. And every year it's a struggle to get everybody to come up with the $365 to get away. So they hold car washes
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Taylor's Peach Shed remains rooted in Greer's history - Greenville News
Google News - over 5 years
Richard Taylor has retired now from Taylor's Peach Shed in Greer, but the stand continues to sell peaches. / OWEN RILEY JR./Staff Nearly a century's worth of peach seasons have come and gone inside Taylor's Peach Shed
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Trailer manufacturer convicted of knowingly employing illegal aliens - Sonoran News
Google News - over 5 years
Arizona Trailer Manufacturing, Inc. and its owner Richard Taylor each pled guilty to a criminal charge of knowingly employing illegal aliens, were fined a total of $30000 and placed on two years probation. PHOENIX – On July 6, Richard Taylor and his
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Convicted killer David Richard Taylor jailed for life a second time - Daily Mail
Google News - over 5 years
The court heard accounts of Taylor's 'chilling' and 'degrading' crimes between 1970 and 2008, which targeted girls and boys. He continues to deny the allegations and as Judge Martin Rudland gave the sentence, Taylor glared defiantly around the
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Business Nabbed for Hiring Illegals - MyFox Phoenix
Google News - over 5 years
Richard Taylor, president and owner of Arizona Trailer Manufacturing, Inc., was sentenced to two years of probation and a $30000 fine. Taylor and the business were convicted of engaging in a pattern and practice of knowingly employing illegal aliens
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Richard Taylor
    FIFTIES
  • 1879
    Age 53
    He died in New York City in the house of his friend and political ally Samuel L. M. Barlow I of dropsy (edema related to congestive heart failure) on 12 April 1879 and was buried in Metairie Cemetery, New Orleans. Richard Taylor was the only son of Margaret Mackall Smith and President Zachary Taylor. His sister Sarah Knox Taylor was the first wife of Jefferson Davis for three months until her death in 1835. Another sister, Mary Elizabeth Bliss who had married William Wallace Smith Bliss in 1848, served as her father's White House hostess.
    More Details Hide Details Although Taylor chose to serve the Confederacy, his uncle, Joseph Pannell Taylor, served on the opposite side as a Brigadier-General in the Union Army. Richard and Marie Taylor had five children, two sons and three daughters: Richard, Zachary, Louise, Elizabeth, and Myrthe. Their two sons died of scarlet fever during the War, for which both parents suffered deeply. The Lt. General Richard Taylor Camp #1308, Sons of Confederate Veterans in Shreveport, Louisiana, is named for General Taylor; the camp was chartered in 1971. The former Louisiana State Senator Jackson B. Davis of Shreveport authored a Taylor biography. A complete biography was written in 1992 by T. Michael Parrish, Richard Taylor, Soldier Prince of Dixie.
  • THIRTIES
  • 1865
    Age 39
    The rest of his company was paroled on May 12, 1865 in Gainesville, Alabama.
    More Details Hide Details Taylor did not have any military experience until the Civil War broke out. However, most of Taylor's contemporaries, subordinates, and superiors spoke many times of his military prowess as he proved himself capable both in the field and in departmental command. Nathan Bedford Forrest commented about Taylor, "He's the biggest man in the lot. If we'd had more like him, we would have licked the Yankees long ago." Charles Erasmus Fenner, an officer in the Confederate Trans-Mississippi Department and post-war Louisiana Supreme Court justice, asserted that, "Dick Taylor was a born soldier. Probably no civilian of his time was more deeply versed in the annals of war, including the achievements and personal characteristics of all the great captains, the details and philosophies of their campaigns, and their strategic theories and practice." Major General Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson and Major General Richard S. Ewell frequently commented on their conversations with Taylor about military history, strategy and tactics. In particular, Ewell stated that he came away from his conversations with Taylor more knowledgeable, impressed with the amount of information Taylor possessed. It was Stonewall Jackson who recommended promoting Taylor to major general and putting him in command of Confederate forces in western Louisiana. There were only three lieutenant generals in the Confederacy who did not graduate from West Point, and Taylor became one of them.
    Taylor was given command of the Department of Alabama, Mississippi, and East Louisiana. After John Bell Hood's disastrous campaign into Tennessee, Taylor was given command of the Army of Tennessee. He surrendered his department at Citronelle, Alabama, the last major Confederate force remaining east of the Mississippi, to Union General Edward Canby on May 4, 1865, and was paroled three days later.
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  • 1864
    Age 38
    On April 8, 1864, Taylor was promoted to lieutenant general, despite having asked to be relieved because of his distrust of his superior in the campaign, General Edmund Kirby Smith.
    More Details Hide Details The Congress of the Confederate States issued a joint resolution, which officially thanked Taylor and his soldiers for their military service during Red River Campaign.
    In 1864, Taylor defeated Union General Nathaniel P. Banks in the Red River Campaign with a smaller force, commanding the Confederate forces in the Battle of Mansfield and the Battle of Pleasant Hill on April 8-9.
    More Details Hide Details He pursued Banks back to the Mississippi River and, for his efforts, received the thanks of the Confederate Congress. At these two battles, the two commanders whom Taylor had come to rely on: Brigadier Generals Alfred Mouton and Thomas Green, were killed while leading their men into combat.
  • 1863
    Age 37
    In 1863, in response to Confederates summarily executing black U.S. soldiers, U.S. Army general Ulysses S. Grant, wrote a letter to Taylor, urging the Confederates to treat captured black U.S. soldiers humanely and professionally and not murder them.
    More Details Hide Details Grant stated the official position of the U.S. government, that black U.S. soldiers were sworn military men and not insurrectionist slaves, as the Confederates asserted they were. Taylor's plan was to move down the Bayou Teche, overcoming the lightly defended outposts and supply depots, and then capturing New Orleans, which would cut off Nathaniel P. Banks's army from their supplies. Although his plan met with approval from Secretary of War James A. Seddon and President Jefferson Davis, Taylor's immediate superior, Edmund Kirby Smith, felt that operations on the Louisiana banks of the Mississippi across from Vicksburg would be the best strategy to halt the Siege of Vicksburg. From Alexandria, Louisiana, Taylor marched his army up to Richmond, Louisiana. There he was joined with Confederate Maj. Gen. John G. Walker's Texas Division, who called themselves "Walker's Greyhounds". Taylor ordered Walker's division to attack Federal troops at two locations on the Louisiana side of the Mississippi. The ensuing Battle of Milliken's Bend and Battle of Young's Point failed to accomplish the Confederate objectives. After initial success at Milliken's Bend, that engagement ended in failure after Federal gunboats began shelling the Confederate positions. Young's Point ended prematurely as well.
    During 1863, Taylor directed an effective series of clashes with Union forces over control of lower Louisiana, most notably at Battle of Fort Bisland and the Battle of Irish Bend.
    More Details Hide Details These clashes were fought against Union Maj. Gen. Nathaniel P. Banks for control of the Bayou Teche region in southern Louisiana and his ultimate objective of Port Hudson. After Banks had successfully pushed Taylor's Army of Western Louisiana aside, he continued on his way to Port Hudson via Alexandria, Louisiana. After these battles, Taylor formulated a plan to recapture Bayou Teche, along with the city of New Orleans, Louisiana, and to halt the Siege of Port Hudson.
  • 1862
    Age 36
    Before Taylor returned to Louisiana, Federal forces in the area had raided throughout much of southern Louisiana. During the spring of 1862, Union forces came upon Taylor's Fashion plantation and plundered it.
    More Details Hide Details Taylor found the district almost completely devoid of troops and supplies. However, he did the best with these limited resources by securing two capable subordinates, veteran infantry commander Jean-Jacques "Alfred" Mouton, and veteran cavalry commander Thomas Green. These two commanders would prove crucial to Taylor's upcoming campaigns in the state.
    When Taylor was promoted to the rank of major general on July 28, 1862, he was the youngest major general in the Confederacy.
    More Details Hide Details He was ordered to Opelousas, Louisiana, to conscript and enroll troops in the District of Western Louisiana, part of the Trans-Mississippi Department. The historian John D. Winters wrote that Taylor was: After his service as a recruit officer, Taylor was given command of the tiny District of West Louisiana. Governor Thomas Overton Moore had insistently requested a capable and dedicated officer to assemble the state's defenses and to help counter Federal forays into the state. Attacks of rheumatoid arthritis had left him crippled for days at a time and unable to command in battle. For instance, during the Seven Days battles, Taylor was unable to leave his camp and command his brigade. He missed the Battle of Gaines Mill, and Col. Isaac Seymour, commanding the brigade in his absence, was killed in action.
  • 1861
    Age 35
    On October 21, 1861, Taylor was promoted to brigadier general.
    More Details Hide Details Now he commanded a Louisiana brigade under Richard S. Ewell in the Shenandoah Valley campaign and during the Seven Days. When Taylor was promoted over three more senior regimental commanders, they complained of favoritism. Davis wrote them a letter which noted Taylor's leadership capabilities and promise, and said that he had been recommended by General Stonewall Jackson. During the Valley Campaign, Jackson used Taylor's brigade as an elite strike force that set a rapid marching pace and dealt swift flanking attacks. At the Battle of Front Royal on May 23, the First Battle of Winchester on May 25, and finally at the climactic Battle of Port Republic on June 9, Taylor led the 9th Infantry in timely assaults against strong enemy positions. Afterward, he traveled with the rest of Jackson's command to the Peninsula Campaign. His brigade consisted of various Louisiana regiments, as well as Major Chatham Roberdeau Wheat's "Louisiana Tiger" battalion. The undisciplined lot was known for its hard fighting on the battlefield, but also for its hard living outside. Taylor instilled discipline into the Tigers and, although Major Wheat did not agree with his methods, Taylor won his respect.
  • 1860
    Age 34
    He was sent to the Democratic Convention of 1860 in Charleston, South Carolina, as a state delegate and witnessed the splintering of the Democrats.
    More Details Hide Details While in Charleston, he tried to work out a compromise between the two Democratic factions, but his attempts failed. When the American Civil War erupted, Taylor was asked by Confederate General Braxton Bragg to assist him, as a civilian aide-de-camp without pay, at Pensacola, Florida. Bragg had known Taylor from before the war, and thought his knowledge of military history could help him to organize and train the Confederate forces. Taylor had been opposed to secession, but accepted the appointment. While training recruits, Taylor received news that he was commissioned as a colonel of the 9th Louisiana Infantry. The members of the 9th Louisiana voted for Taylor because they thought that with Taylor's connections to President Davis, who was widower of his late sister Sarah, the unit would be sent out sooner and see battle more quickly. On July 20, he arrived in Richmond with his regiment and received orders from LeRoy Pope Walker, Confederate States Secretary of War, to board the train and move to Manassas to take part in the First Battle of Manassas; the 9th Louisiana arrived at Manassas Junction only hours after the battle was won by the Confederacy.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1855
    Age 29
    In 1855, Taylor entered local politics; he was elected to the Louisiana Senate, in which he served until 1861.
    More Details Hide Details First affiliated with the Whig Party, he shifted to the American (Know Nothing) Party, and finally joined the Democratic Party.
  • 1851
    Age 25
    On February 10, 1851, Richard Taylor married Louise Marie Myrthe Bringier (d. 1875), a native of Louisiana and daughter of a wealthy French Creole matriarch Aglae Bringier.
    More Details Hide Details Steadily Taylor added acreage to the plantation and improved its sugar works at considerable expense and expanded its labor force to nearly 200 slaves. He became one of the wealthiest men in Louisiana for his holdings. Then the freeze of 1856 ruined his crop, forcing him into heavy debt with a large mortgage on the plantation. His mother-in-law, Aglae Bringier financially aided Taylor and his wife.
  • 1850
    Age 24
    After his father's sudden death in July 1850, Taylor inherited it.
    More Details Hide Details
    Having to leave the war because of rheumatoid arthritis, Richard Taylor agreed to manage the family cotton plantation in Jefferson County, Mississippi. In 1850, he persuaded his father (then President after being elected in 1848) to purchase Fashion, a large sugar cane plantation in St. Charles Parish, Louisiana.
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  • TEENAGE
  • 1846
    Age 20
    In the beginning of the Mexican-American War, Taylor visited his father at the Mexican town of Matamoros in July 1846; there are reports that for some time he served as his voluntary aide-de-camp.
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  • 1845
    Age 19
    After starting college studies at Harvard College, Taylor completed them at Yale, where he graduated in 1845.
    More Details Hide Details He was a member of Skull and Bones, Yale's social club. He received no scholastic honors, as he spent the majority of his time reading books on classical and military history.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1826
    Age 0
    Born on January 27, 1826.
    More Details Hide Details
Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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