Rick Rude
Professional wrestler
Rick Rude
Richard Erwin Rood, better known by his ring name "Ravishing" Rick Rude, was an American professional wrestler who performed for many promotions, including World Championship Wrestling (WCW) and the World Wrestling Federation (WWF), in the 1980s and 1990s. Among other accolades, Rude was a four-time world champion, one-time WWF Intercontinental Champion, and one-time WCW United States Champion.
Biography
Rick Rude's personal information overview.
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On this date in WWF history: Pro wrestling loses 'The Big Boss Man'
Cageside Seats - over 3 years
On September 22, 2004, veteran pro wrestler and former corrections officer Ray Traylor passed away in his home as the result of a heart attack at the age of 41. Traylor, billed as "The Big Boss Man" in his 1988 debut with the World Wrestling Federation (WWF), had memorable feuds with Hulk Hogan and Randy Savage and drew considerable heel heat from the audience for his post-fight theatrics, which consisted of handcuffing jobbers to the ropes and beating them with his night stick. He would later sign with World Championship Wrestling (WCW) and worked with everyone from Rick Rude to Big Van Vader to Sting. He left WCW in 1998 to finish his career in the WWE but unfortunately no longer held a prominent role within the company prior to his release in 2003. Highlights of The Big Boss Man's career, including his improbable face turn in 1990 (Ted Dibiase could turn anyone face, that's how good he was), below: How about it Cagesiders, best Ray Traylor memory?
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Cageside Seats article
Regulators relax proposed mortgage rule - Washington Post
Google News - over 3 years
Daily Political Regulators relax proposed mortgage rule Washington Post Federal regulators on Wednesday softened a proposed rule that would require banks to keep a stake in home loans that they parcel out to investors, for fear that the policy would disrupt the nascent housing recovery. The move will likely quiet the outcry from ... Eased Mortgage-Risk Rule to Be Proposed by U.S. AgenciesBloomberg Mortgage proposal aims to avoid market meltdownMarketWatch Regulators Back Away From Tougher Mortgage RulesWall Street Journal Reuters -ABC News all 80 news articles »
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CSS Survivor Series Tournament First Round Match: The Whole Damn Foot vs. Lords of Destruction
Cageside Seats - over 4 years
Let's continue the Cageside Seats (CSS) Survivor Series Tournament, shall we? Next up on the docket is C.J. Bradford's squad, The Whole Damn Foot, taking on DarkTalon's gang, Lords of Destruction. The Whole Damn Foot The Rock Triple H Rick Rude Sycho Sid Mark Henry Stephanie McMahon (WC) VS. Lords of Destruction Undertaker Edge Kane Christian Rob Van Dam Paul Bearer (WC) You'll vote in this tournament in the same way we've voted in every other tournament. Take a look at the teams you see above and choose who you think the winner should be. To vote The Whole Damn Foot simply write: Vote - Foot To vote Lords of Destruction simply write: Vote - Lords Good luck! Here's a promo from Dark Talon on why you should vote for Lords of Destruction: Ring Announcer: "At this time, please welcome the greatest tag team in the history of the world, the Rated-R Superstar and Captain Charisma, two members of the Lords of Destruction, EDGE AND CHRISTIAN!"(Music Hits ...
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Cageside Seats article
On this date in WWF history: Pro wrestling loses 'The Big Boss Man'
Cageside Seats - over 4 years
On September 22, 2004, veteran pro wrestler and former corrections officer Ray Traylor passed away in his home as the result of a heart attack at the age of 41. Traylor, billed as "The Big Boss Man" in his 1988 debut with the World Wrestling Federation (WWF), had memorable feuds with Hulk Hogan and Randy Savage and drew considerable heel heat from the audience for his post-fight theatrics, which consisted of handcuffing jobbers to the ropes and beating them with his night stick. He would later sign with World Championship Wrestling (WCW) and worked with everyone from Rick Rude to Big Van Vader to Sting. He left WCW in 1998 to finish his career in the WWE but unfortunately no longer held a prominent role within the company prior to his release in 2003. Highlights of The Big Boss Man's career, including his improbable face turn in 1990 (Ted Dibiase could turn anyone face, that's how good he was), after the jump. How about it Cagesiders, best Ray Traylor memory?
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Cageside Seats article
WWE's list of the top 50 finishing moves of all time from upcoming DVD release
Cageside Seats - over 4 years
What is the greatest finishing move in pro wrestling history? WWE is answering that question in an upcoming DVD release counting down the top 50 finishers of all time. The video will hit shelves on Aug. 21, 2012. But you know how we're such blithering marks for lists like this, Cagesiders. We couldn't wait to take a gander at the goods and let you fine folks dissect it and tear it to shreds. And after seeing it, believe me, that's exactly what you're going to want to do. Here's your teaser before you take the jump and see the full list for yourself -- I agree with number one and then I absolutely despise the entire rest of the list. Sufficiently excited to see it? Good. Check it out: 50. JBL - Clothesline from Hell 49. Vader - Vader Bomb 48. Dusty Rhodes - Bionic Elbow 47. Ted DiBiase - Million Dollar Dream 46. Kerry Von Erich - Iron Claw 45. Rick Rude - Rude Awakening 44. Lex Luger - Torture Rack 43. Dudley Boyz - 3-D 42. Bam Bam Bigelow - Moonsault 41. Diamon ...
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Cageside Seats article
WWE names top 25 masters of the microphone
Cageside Seats - over 4 years
Yes, we're going to beat these lists to death. Really, we here at Cageside Seats are just marks for countdown style lists. I know we've said as much before but it's worth repeating again seeing as we run so many thanks to the fine folks at WWE.com coming up with something new and interesting seemingly every day. The latest countdown is a top 25 list of the greatest masters of the microphone. The art of an effective promo is something every great superstar must learn and master before they can ever truly transcend their spot within pro wrestling. Indeed, when you think of the all time greats, almost all of them were exceedingly good on the stick. Men like Hulk Hogan, Ric Flair, Stone Cold Steve Austin and The Rock could all captivate audiences with nothing but a live mic. But where do they rank on the list? Let's find out: 25. Capt. Lou Albano 24. Rick Rude 23. Santino Marella 22. The Million Dollar Man Ted Dibiase 21. The Miz 20. Jesse Ventura 19. Triple H 18. P ...
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Cageside Seats article
Rick Rule’s Primer on Contrarian Speculation
Jutia Group - almost 5 years
In an interview with Louis James, Rick Rule provides an excellent summary of what contrarian speculation investment is and makes a powerful case that the current metals climate means gold stocks are the play to . . . → Read More: Rick Rule’s Primer on Contrarian Speculation
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Jutia Group article
DDP Discusses WWE Hall Of Fame & Scott Hall
Wrestling News Source - almost 5 years
During a recent interview with SportsTownChicago.com, Diamond Dallas Page spoke about a number of subjects, two of them being how he wants to be inducted into the WWE Hall of Fame and Scott Hall: Wanting To Be Inducted Into The WWE Hall Of Fame: I think eventually it's got to happen. Nobody did what I did. Nobody was as over in the 90's. I was in the top five guys according to Pro Wrestling Illustrated. Nobody came from being a manager to being a color commentator. I think I earned that spot and eventually, I think I'll get it. I hope it's not 30 years from now, but until Randy Savage is in there, until Jake Roberts, until Rick Rude, I'm not in yet. I would think Randy's going to be in next year. I'd be surprised if he wasn't. But it would be the greatest bill ever to be inducted because it's in Jersey. It is what it is and when it happens it happens.  Scott Hall: I love Scott. He's one of my very good friends...Today, we talk once in a blue moon, but the last time he called me, he was ...
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Wrestling News Source article
Info on WWE's Upcoming WCW Clash of the Champions DVD Set
Wrestling News Source - almost 5 years
The Real Story NWA World Heavyweight Championship Match ‘Nature Boy’ Ric Flair vs. Sting Clash of the Champions 27th March, 1988 NWA World Tag Team Championship Match Arn Anderson & Tully Blanchard vs. Lex Luger & Barry Windham Clash of the Champions 27th March, 1988 Why Wait a Whole Year? NWA World Tag Team Championship Match Arn Anderson & Tully Blanchard vs. Sting & Dusty Rhodes Clash of the Champions II 8th June, 1988 Russian Chain Match Ricky Morton vs. Ivan Koloff Clash of the Champions III 7th September, 1988 “I Quit” Match for the NWA World Heavyweight Championship ‘Nature Boy’ Ric Flair vs. Terry Funk Clash of the Champions IX 15th November, 1989 Mil Mascaras vs. Cactus Jack Manson Clash of the Champions X 6th February, 1990 NWA World Tag Team Championship Match Midnight Express vs. Rock & Roll Express Clash of the Champions XI 13th June, 1990 To Be The Man, You Gotta Beat The Man NWA United States Championship Match ‘Nature Boy’ Ric Flair v ...
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Wrestling News Source article
Who Am I ??? - Wrestling News World
Google News - over 5 years
Chris became WCCW World Champion by beating Rick Rude in 1986...before Rude became so "ravishing". He also defeated "Gorgeous" Jimmy Garvin, on two occasions, to become WCCW NWA American champion. In the GWF, he was also a two-time North American
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Google News article
Top 15 Greatest Old School Pro Wrestling Personas - Bleacher Report
Google News - over 5 years
Richard Erwin Rood would have been successful anyway because he was in amazing shape and he had charisma, confidence and a great wrestling game which included technical skills and speed, but by becoming Ravishing Rick Rude, he hit the extreme jackpot
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Will 'Warrior' Make You Cry? (and 24 Other Urgent Questions) - Moviefone (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Could you imagine if your high school physics teacher was Ravishing Rick Rude or Big John Studd? Q: How long after writing that last answer did you realize that both Ravishing Rick Rude and Big John Stud had died -- and how long did it take you then to
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Google News article
WWE: 10 Superstars More Worthy of the WWE Title Than Alberto Del Rio - Bleacher Report
Google News - over 5 years
He is a great character who is a throw back to guys like Rick Rude who always had you interested in what was coming next. This man is worthy of holding a WWE Title, and has proven he'll do whatever it takes to be in WWE. I give you the Spirit Squad!
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Google News article
WWE: Could We Be Seeing a New, New World Order? - Bleacher Report
Google News - over 5 years
As the weeks progressed, more guys joined the nWo ranks, some were expected and others were unexpected (like Rick Rude showing up on a Live Nitro and a tapped RAW). The WWE already shocked us with Nash showing up at SummerSlam
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Haute Event: Evan Ross Celebrates Birthday At Fiat Beach House - Haute Living
Google News - over 5 years
DJ Rick Rude manned the turntables while the Lifestyle Kissing Photo Booth became the hit of the party. Like Haute Living Los Angeles? Join our Facebook page or follow us on Twitter @HauteLivingLA. Want Haute Living Los Angeles delivered to your inbox
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Rick Rude
    FORTIES
  • 1999
    Age 40
    Rude left the company in early 1999.
    More Details Hide Details
  • THIRTIES
  • 1998
    Age 39
    By late 1998, both Rude and Hennig were off WCW TV due to injuries.
    More Details Hide Details Hennig had an ongoing leg injury that year, and Rude was thought to have had testicular cancer which later turned out to be a spermatocele. Hennig returned to the nWo from his injury at Starrcade without Rude, who was still unable to appear.
  • 1997
    Age 38
    Rude appeared on both WWF's Raw Is War and WCW's Monday Nitro on November 17, 1997.
    More Details Hide Details A mustached Rude appeared on Nitro, which was live, and proceeded to criticize Shawn Michaels, DX, and the WWF, calling the company the "Titanic" (a reference to Titan Sports, as WWF's parent company was then known, as the "sinking ship"). An hour later on Raw Is War (which had been taped six days earlier), Rude then appeared with the full beard he had been sporting during his return to the WWF. Rude also appeared on ECW's Hardcore TV during that weekend (November 14–16 as the show was syndicated differently depending on the market). Rude was still making ECW appearances while in D-Generation X. In WCW, Rude became a member of the New World Order (nWo), managing his friend Curt Hennig. Thus, Rude became the first wrestler to be part of both DX and nWo. When the nWo split, Hennig and Rude joined the nWo Wolfpac, and they tried to motivate Konnan to defeat Goldberg, who was undefeated at the time. When Konnan was defeated by Goldberg, Rude and Hennig attacked him, later joining nWo Hollywood, the rivals of the Wolfpac.
    On August 11, 1997, Rude returned to WWF as the "insurance policy" of the D-Generation X (DX) stable (Shawn Michaels, Triple H, and Chyna).
    More Details Hide Details As a member of DX, Rude never wrestled, but stayed ringside during the group's matches. He once again left WWF after the Montreal Screwjob at Survivor Series. According to Bret Hart, Rude stayed in the locker room during Bret's confrontation with Vince McMahon, later calling Eric Bischoff and informing him what had happened was in fact real. As Rude was not signed to a full-time contract with WWF, and was instead performing on a "pay-per-appearance" basis, Rude was able to negotiate a deal with Bischoff and WCW, in part due to his anger over the Montreal Screwjob.
    In the main event of ECW Heat Wave 1997, Rude made a one-off return to the ring in a six-man tag team match, where he partnered with ECW mainstays Tommy Dreamer and The Sandman to face Jerry Lawler and ECW stars Rob Van Dam and Sabu.
    More Details Hide Details During the ECW versus USWA/WWF inter-company competition, Rude helped Lawler win matches against Dreamer and The Sandman.
    Rude collected on a Lloyd's of London insurance policy and did not appear in wrestling again until early 1997, when he joined Extreme Championship Wrestling (ECW) as a masked man who harassed Shane Douglas, at one point spanking Francine.
    More Details Hide Details He eventually unmasked and became a color commentator before later aligning himself, for a short time, with Douglas and his Triple Threat stable.
  • 1994
    Age 35
    WCW created their own championship, dubbing it the WCW International World Heavyweight Championship, which Rude lost to Hiroshi Hase on March 16, 1994 in Tokyo, Japan.
    More Details Hide Details Rude regained the title just eight days later in Kyoto, Japan. After dropping the title to Sting on April 17 at Spring Stampede, Rude pinned Sting on May 1 at Wrestling Dontaku in Fukuoka to become a three-time champion. Rude, however, injured his back during the match when, upon receiving a suicide dive at ringside, he landed on the corner of the raised platform surrounding the ring; unable to wrestle, he was stripped of the title (with the storyline excuse that he was found to have used the title belt as a weapon in the course of the match). Rude retired shortly thereafter.
  • 1993
    Age 34
    Rude defeated Flair for the title in September 1993 at Fall Brawl.
    More Details Hide Details As WCW had recently withdrawn from the NWA, WCW lost the rights to continue using the NWA World Heavyweight Championship.
    Rude switched his sights to the NWA World Heavyweight Championship, making his intentions clear on August 28, 1993, when he was the guest on then-champion Ric Flair's "A Flair For the Gold" talk segment.
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    Rude returned alone in April 1993 and tried to reclaim the title from Dustin Rhodes, who had won it while he was injured.
    More Details Hide Details The title was eventually held up after several controversial finishes to matches between the two. After a 30-minute Iron Man Match ended in a 1-1 draw at Beach Blast on July 18, a best-of-three series was set between the two on WCW Saturday Night; Rude won the first match on August 28, but lost to Rhodes twice on September 4 and 11, losing his chance at regaining the U.S. title.
  • 1992
    Age 33
    In December 1992, Rude suffered a legitimate neck injury and was forced to forfeit the United States Championship, thus ending his reign of nearly 14 months, a reign that still stands today as the second longest reign in the almost 40 year history of the title.
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    In 1992, Rude and Madusa left The Dangerous Alliance and feuded with Nikita Koloff.
    More Details Hide Details Rude challenged reigning WCW World Heavyweight Champion Ron Simmons on several occasions but did not defeat him.
  • 1991
    Age 32
    On November 19, 1991, Rude defeated Sting for the WCW United States Heavyweight Championship and engaged in a number of high-profile feuds, including one with Ricky Steamboat.
    More Details Hide Details At one point during their feud, Steamboat suffered a kayfabe broken nose in a gang attack.
    After spending a year wrestling in select shows in the independent circuit, as well as a July 1991 tour for All Japan Pro Wrestling (AJPW), Rude returned to WCW, which had originally been JCP prior to being sold to Ted Turner in late 1988; he returned under a mask as The WCW Phantom at Halloween Havoc on October 27, 1991, unmasking himself later that night.
    More Details Hide Details He led The Dangerous Alliance, consisting of himself, Paul E. Dangerously, Madusa, Arn Anderson, Bobby Eaton, Larry Zbyszko, and "Stunning" Steve Austin.
  • 1990
    Age 31
    The two battled in a steel cage at SummerSlam 1990; however, Rude failed to win the title and departed from WWF in October 1990.
    More Details Hide Details This departure came right before he was scheduled to feud with Big Boss Man, which had its potential start when Rude started to make degrading comments about Boss Man's mother.
    Rude then feuded with Piper, before resuming his conflict with The Ultimate Warrior in the summer of 1990 after Warrior had won the WWF World Heavyweight Championship.
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  • 1989
    Age 30
    Rude's next big feud was with The Ultimate Warrior and began in January at the 1989 Royal Rumble pay-per-view in a "Super Posedown" that ended with Rude attacking Warrior with a metal pose bar.
    More Details Hide Details With help from Heenan, Rude won the WWF Intercontinental Heavyweight Championship from The Ultimate Warrior at WrestleMania V, before dropping it back to Warrior at SummerSlam that same year, due in large part to interference from "Rowdy" Roddy Piper.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1988
    Age 29
    In 1988 Macho Man Randy Savage, who was WWF World Heavyweight Champion at the time, purposely chose Rick Rude and the Dynamite Kid to watch his back at a bar when they were in NWA territory.
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    Rood married his wife Michelle in 1988 and the couple remained together until his death in 1999, having three children together.
    More Details Hide Details His youngest son, Colton, died on September 3, 2016, in an motorcycle accident in Rome, Georgia, at the age of 19. Bret Hart has stated that Rood was a devoted family man who never took his wedding ring off even during matches; covering it up with tape. Hart also stated that Rude, along with Curt Hennig, was one of the greatest technical wrestlers of his era.
    Rude's feud with Roberts came to its conclusion when Roberts pinned Rude following a DDT during the 1988 Survivor Series.
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    Through mid-1988 Rude continued to wear a second pair of tights under the one he wore to the ring, including during his match against the Junkyard Dog at the inaugural SummerSlam at Madison Square Garden.
    More Details Hide Details During the match Rude had the JYD on his back and had climbed to the top turnbuckle. While up there he pulled down his tights to reveal a second with Cheryl Roberts printed on them. After hitting the Dog with a flying fist, he was attacked by Roberts who had seen the action from the dressing room. Roberts attack on Rude caused the JYD to be disqualified, giving Rude the win.
  • 1987
    Age 28
    Rude made his World Wrestling Federation (WWF) debut in July 1987 as the newest addition to the Bobby Heenan Family.
    More Details Hide Details His first feud in the WWF was with Heenan's former muscle bound charge "Mr. Wonderful" Paul Orndorff (who Heenan had dropped after Rude joined the Family), before starting one of his most famous feuds with Jake "The Snake" Roberts. Rude had a routine where, before the match, he would make a show of removing his robe while insulting the males in the crowd (usually calling them "Fat", "out of shape" or "sweathogs") and, after his victories, he would kiss a woman that Heenan picked from the fans. One of Rude's trademarks was his specially airbrushed tights that he wore during matches. In one storyline, he tried to get Roberts' real-life wife, Cheryl, to comply (though not knowing when Heenan chose her that she was in fact the wife of Jake "The Snake"). After Mrs Roberts rejected him and revealed who she was there to see, Rude got angry (after she slapped him) and grabbed her wrist, berating her on the microphone when Roberts ran from the dressing room to make the save. On another occasion during the Roberts/Rude feud, Rude came to the ring with a picture of Cheryl stenciled on the front of his tights. A furious Roberts charged the ring and stripped Rude, appearing to television viewers to leave him naked, although the live audience saw him stripped to a g-string instead.
  • 1986
    Age 27
    Rude and Fernandez, known collectively as the "Awesome Twosome", won the NWA World Tag Team Championship on December 6, 1986 from The Rock 'n' Roll Express, and they began a feud that ended only when Rude left the promotion for the World Wrestling Federation in April 1987.
    More Details Hide Details To explain the sudden departure, Jim Crockett, Jr. aired a pre-taped non-title match where the Express defeated Rude and Fernandez and claimed that Rude had been injured as a result.
    In September 1986, Rude returned to JCP and joined Manny Fernandez and his manager Paul Jones in their rivalry with Wahoo McDaniel.
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    After losing the title to Chris Adams in July 1986, he fired Pringle and briefly replaced him with his sister, Raven.
    More Details Hide Details He formed a short-lived tag team with The Dingo Warrior, but the Warrior turned on him and became a face.
  • 1985
    Age 26
    During his time in WCCW, Rude captured the NWA American Heavyweight Championship on November 4, 1985.
    More Details Hide Details However, WCCW withdrew from the NWA on February 20, 1986, and changed its name to the World Class Wrestling Association. The NWA American Championship was renamed the WCWA World Heavyweight Championship while Rude was still holding the title. As a result, Rude became the promotion's first world champion.
    In late 1985, Rude jumped to World Class Championship Wrestling (WCCW) along with Pringle, where he feuded with Kevin Von Erich and Chris Adams.
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    While teaming with Jesse Barr, he won the NWA Florida United States Tag Team Championship on April 16, 1985, and feuded with Billy Jack Haynes and Wahoo McDaniel over the belts, losing the straps to McDaniel and Haynes on July 9, 1985.
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    He captured the championship again on July 20, 1985, when he defeated Mike Graham in the finals of a Southern title tournament.
    More Details Hide Details He held the belt until October 2 of that year when he dropped it to Wahoo McDaniel, who was booking Florida during this time.
    He defeated Pez Whatley for the NWA Florida Southern Heavyweight Championship on January 16, 1985 and lost it to Brian Blair on April 10, 1985.
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  • 1984
    Age 25
    Rude was hired by Championship Wrestling from Florida (CWF) in December 1984, where he was managed by Percy Pringle.
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    He returned to Memphis in 1984, this time as "Ravishing" Rick Rude, an overconfident, arrogant heel managed by Jimmy Hart.
    More Details Hide Details Rude feuded with Jerry Lawler and later his former partner, King Kong Bundy.
  • 1983
    Age 24
    Rude also was a noted arm wrestler, finishing sixth in the world championships in Las Vegas in the light heavyweight division in 1983.
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    Rude debuted on the May 28, 1983 episode of World Championship Wrestling, defeating Pat Rose with a dropkick.
    More Details Hide Details Gordon Solie interviewed Rude the following week, with Rude discussing transitioning from arm wrestling to pro wrestling and dropping weight to increase speed. He later left and joined the National Wrestling Alliance (NWA) affiliate Jim Crockett Promotions (JCP) where he and a variety of tag team partners feuded with The Road Warriors.
  • 1982
    Age 23
    Rude lost his TV debut against Mid-Atlantic Champion Paul Jones on the November 20, 1982 episode of NWA World Wide Wrestling.
    More Details Hide Details He started with Vancouver's NWA: All-Star Wrestling before moving on to compete for Georgia Championship Wrestling (GCW) and later the Memphis-based Continental Wrestling Association (CWA).
    After graduating from Anoka-Ramsey Community College with a degree in physical education, Rude trained as a wrestler under Eddie Sharkey. He began wrestling in 1982 as Ricky Rood, a babyface jobber.
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    Rude wrestled from 1982 until his 1994 retirement due to injury, with a final match following in 1997.
    More Details Hide Details Among other accolades, he was a four-time world champion (three-time WCW International World Heavyweight Champion and one-time WCWA World Heavyweight Champion), a one-time WWF Intercontinental Heavyweight Champion, and a one-time WCW United States Heavyweight Champion. Rude also challenged for the WWF World Heavyweight Championship and the NWA World Heavyweight Championship on pay-per-view. In 1997, Rude co-founded the influential D-Generation X stable, along with Shawn Michaels, Triple H, and Chyna. On November 17 of that year, he became the only person to appear on the WWF's Raw Is War and WCW's Monday Nitro on the same night, as the former was pre-recorded and Rude had left for WCW in the interim. Rude was born in St. Peter, Minnesota to Richard Clyde Rood and Sally Jean Thompson. He attended Robbinsdale High School in Robbinsdale, Minnesota with Tom Zenk, Brady Boone, Nikita Koloff, Curt Hennig, John Nord, Road Warrior Animal, and Barry Darsow, all of whom later became professional wrestlers. He was especially close with his childhood friend Curt Hennig.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1958
    Born
    Born on December 7, 1958.
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Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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