Robert Capa
Hungarian photographer
Robert Capa
Robert Capa was a Hungarian combat photographer and photojournalist who covered five different wars: the Spanish Civil War, the Second Sino-Japanese War, World War II across Europe, the 1948 Arab-Israeli War, and the First Indochina War. He documented the course of World War II in London, North Africa, Italy, the Battle of Normandy on Omaha Beach and the liberation of Paris.
Biography
Robert Capa's personal information overview.
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Photo Albums
Popular photos of Robert Capa
News
News abour Robert Capa from around the web
THE 9/11 DECADE; Ironworkers of the Sky
NYTimes - over 5 years
To get to the top of 1 World Trade Center as it stands in mid-August, just shy of 1,000 feet above Lower Manhattan, higher than anything else on the island’s southern end, first you walk to the middle of the blast-resistant concrete cathedral that will become the building’s lobby. From there, a hoist takes you to the 39th floor, whose
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Travel: Swiss delights of Davos and Klosters - Swindon Business News
Google News - over 5 years
War photographer Robert Capa stayed too and Greta Garbo was a regular guest. With a history like that, and only 12 individual and unique rooms in the hotel, prices to stay aren't cheap. But with an average main course at Chesa Grischuna, costing around
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Ironworkers of the Sky - New York Times
Google News - over 5 years
The sentiment of Ethan Kitzes, a 41-year-old ironworker at 1 World Trade, could apply just as well to Robert Capa on Omaha Beach in 1944 or Frank Hurley adrift on an Antarctic ice floe with Shackleton in 1915: “There is no dress rehearsal
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DocuWeeks' Week 3: Elmo, David Letterman and military matters - Los Angeles Times
Google News - over 5 years
Trisha Ziff's story of the recovery of 4500 negatives taken by the great photographers Robert Capa, Gerda Taro and David Seymour during the Spanish Civil War. Rachel Libert and Tony Hardmon produced and directed this documentary about a Marine's
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Sean Smith: Frontlines - Morning Star Online
Google News - over 5 years
Generally considered the greatest photographer to have documented the horrors of modern warfare, Robert Capa once opined that "if your pictures aren't good enough, you aren't close enough." Working exclusively for the Guardian and Observer,
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Google News article
Tales of <i>The Mexican Suitcase</i> - TIME
Google News - over 5 years
For years there persisted a rumor that a suitcase, lost in the chaos of World War II, containing the negatives of photojournalists Robert Capa, Gerda Taro, and David “Chim” Seymour taken during the Spanish Civil War had survived
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Libyan forces move forward from Benghazi - Demotix
Google News - over 5 years
My summers are spent mostly here at home in Wales, photographing weddings and working in the studio. This will them pay for a trip or two in the winter enabling me to do what I crave. As the great Robert Capa said &#39;I hope to stay unemployed as a war
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Listening at Latinbeat, Looking In on Ol' Blue Eyes - Wall Street Journal
Google News - over 5 years
&#39;The Mexican Suitcase&#39; recounts the recovery of a case belonging to Robert Capa. It&#39;s a sign that documentaries have achieved a new cache when the most interesting races at the Academy Awards are in the nonfiction categories
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Photo agency Magnum wants help tagging 250000 archival photos - Toronto Star
Google News - over 5 years
Founded in 1947 by photographers Robert Capa, Henri Cartier-Bresson, George Rodger and David “Chim” Seymour, the photo agency is stepping into unmarked territory – with an archival tagging project that will rely on crowdsourcing
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Growing up with photography and picturing youth - The Japan Times
Google News - over 5 years
The second gallery is a treasure trove of well-known images including Robert Doisneau&#39;s famous &quot;kiss&quot; photograph (&quot;Le Baiser de l&#39;Hotel de Ville,&quot; 1950), Robert Capa&#39;s 1944 D-Day photo, and &quot;The Walk to Paradise Garden&quot; by William Eugene Smith
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Monroe, Brando Ooze Hollywood Glamour in London Exhibition: Martin Gayford - Bloomberg
Google News - over 5 years
Robert Capa, one of the major photographers included, once remarked, “It&#39;s not enough to have talent, you also have to be Hungarian.” That was a backhanded way of emphasizing how many masters of the camera emerged from Hungary between 1920 and 1940
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What's on Around Europe - Wall Street Journal
Google News - over 5 years
&quot;Les Recontres d&#39;Arles 2011&quot; presents 47 photography exhibitions, including work by Graciela Iturbide, Gabriel Figueroa, Maya Goded, Dulce Pinzon, Enrique Metinides and Robert Capa. &#39;Untitled&#39; by Christophe Agou, from the series &#39;Facing Silence&#39;
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Eyewitness: Hungarian Photography in the 20th Century - British Journal of Photography
Google News - over 5 years
As the Royal Academy&#39;s forthcoming exhibition will show, this small European country punched well above its weight in the photography world in the middle of the last century, giving us people such as Robert Capa, László Moholy-Nagy, André Kertész,
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Google News article
Recommended: Looking back at the Spanish Civil War, 75 years on - msnbc.com (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Three photographers in their twenties, Robert Capa, David Seymour, and Gerda Taro were among the pack. Writing for the International Center of Photogarphy, Kate Nearpass, an Exehibition Researcher described them: Their photographs were distinguished by
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Robert Capa
    FORTIES
  • 1954
    Age 40
    Although a few years earlier he had said he was finished with war, Capa accepted and accompanied a French regiment with two Time-Life journalists, John Mecklin and Jim Lucas. On May 25, 1954 at 2:55 pm, the regiment was passing through a dangerous area under fire when Capa decided to leave his Jeep and go up the road to photograph the advance.
    More Details Hide Details About five minutes later, Mecklin and Lucas heard an explosion; Capa had stepped on a landmine. When they arrived on the scene, he was alive but his left leg had been blown to pieces, and he had a serious wound in his chest. Mecklin called for a medic and Capa was taken to a small field hospital, where he was pronounced dead on arrival. He is buried in plot #189 at Amawalk Hill Cemetery (also called Friends Cemetery), Amawalk, Westchester County, New York along with his mother, Julia, and his brother, Cornell Capa. Capa was born into a Jewish family in Budapest, where his parents were tailors. At the age of 18, Capa moved to Vienna, later relocated to Prague, and finally settled in Berlin: all cities that were centers of artistic and cultural ferment in this period. He started studies in journalism at the German Political College, but the Nazi Party instituted restrictions on Jews and prohibited them from colleges. Capa relocated to Paris, where he adopted the name 'Robert Capa' in 1934. At that time, he had already been a hobby-photographer.
  • THIRTIES
  • 1952
    Age 38
    In 1952, he became the president.
    More Details Hide Details Capa toured Israel after its founding. While there, he took the numerous photographs that accompanied Irwin Shaw's book, Report on Israel. In the early 1950s, Capa traveled to Japan for an exhibition associated with Magnum Photos. While there, Life magazine asked him to go on assignment to Southeast Asia, where the French had been fighting for eight years in the First Indochina War.
  • 1947
    Age 33
    In 1947, Capa founded the cooperative venture Magnum Photos in Paris with Henri Cartier-Bresson, William Vandivert, David Seymour, and George Rodger.
    More Details Hide Details It was a cooperative agency to manage work for and by freelance photographers, and developed a reputation for the excellence of its photo-journalists.
    In 1947 Capa traveled to the Soviet Union with his friend, the American writer John Steinbeck.
    More Details Hide Details He took photos in Moscow, Kiev, Tbilisi, Batumi and among the ruins of Stalingrad. Steinbeck's account of their journey, A Russian Journal, (1948) was illustrated with Capa's photos.
  • 1946
    Age 32
    The relationship ended in the summer of 1946 when Capa traveled to Turkey.
    More Details Hide Details Capa is known for redefining wartime photojournalism. His work came from the trenches as opposed to the more arms-length perspective that was the precedent. He was famed for saying, "If your photographs aren't good enough, you're not close enough." Scholars have re-examined Capa's image of The Falling Soldier and disagreed about its authenticity. In 2003, a reporter for the Spanish newspaper El Periodico claimed the photo was taken near the town of Espejo, 10 km from Cerro Muriano, and that the image was staged. In 2009, a Spanish professor published a book titled Shadows of Photography, in which he showed that the photograph could not have been taken where, when, or how Capa and his backers have said. For decades, many of Capa's photographs of the Spanish Civil War were presumed lost, but they surfaced in Mexico City in the late 1990s. While fleeing Europe in 1939, Capa had lost the collection, which over time came to be dubbed the "Mexican suitcase".
  • 1945
    Age 31
    In 1945, Elaine Justin broke up with Capa; she later married Chuck Romine.
    More Details Hide Details Some months later Capa became the lover of the actress Ingrid Bergman, who was touring in Europe to entertain American soldiers.p. 176 In December 1945, Capa followed her to Hollywood, where he worked for American International Pictures for a short time.
    On April 18, 1945, Capa captured images of a fight to secure a bridge in Leipzig, Germany.
    More Details Hide Details These pictures included an image of Raymond J. Bowman's death by sniper fire. This image became famous in a spread in Life magazine with the caption "The picture of the last man to die."
  • TWENTIES
  • 1943
    Age 29
    In February 1943 Capa met Elaine Justin, then married to the actor John Justin.
    More Details Hide Details They fell in love and the relationship lasted until the end of the war. Capa spent most of his time in the frontline. Capa called the redheaded Elaine "Pinky," and wrote about her in his war memoir, Slightly Out of Focus.
    On October 7, 1943 Robert Capa was in Naples with Life reporter Will Lang Jr., and there he photographed the Naples post office bombing.
    More Details Hide Details Probably his most famous images, The Magnificent Eleven, are a group of photos of D-Day. Taking part in the Allied invasion, Capa was with the second wave of American troops on Omaha Beach. The men storming Omaha Beach faced some of the heaviest resistance from German troops inside the bunkers of the Atlantic Wall. While under constant fire, Capa took 106 pictures, all but eleven were destroyed in a photo lab accident back in London.
    During July and August 1943 Capa was in Sicily with American troops, near Sperlinga, Nicosia and Troina.
    More Details Hide Details The Francais were advancing toward Troina, a strategically located town which controlled the road to Messina (Sicily's main port to the Italian mainland). The town was heavily defended by the Germans Nazis, in an attempt to evacuate all German troops. Robert Capa's pictures show the Sicilian population's sufferings under German bombing and their happiness when American soldiers arrive. One notable photograph from this period shows a Sicilian peasant indicating the direction in which German troops had gone, very near the Castle of Sperlinga, in the district of Contrada Capostrà of the medieval Sperlinga village. The picture of Sperlinga, a few weeks later, became very popular, not only in the US but around all the world, as a symbol of the Allied US Army landings in Sicily and the liberation of Italy from the Nazis.
  • 1936
    Age 22
    In 1936, Capa became known across the globe for the "Falling Soldier" photo long thought to have been taken in Cerro Muriano on the Cordoba Front.
    More Details Hide Details It was thought to be of a Workers' Party of Marxist Unification (POUM) militiaman who had just been shot and was falling to his death, and was long considered an iconic image of the war. The authenticity of the photograph is today in doubt, with scholars questioning its location, the identity of its subject, and the discovery of staged photographs taken at the same time and place. At the start of World War II, Capa was in New York City, having moved there from Paris to look for work, and to escape Nazi persecution. During the war, Capa was sent to various parts of the European Theatre on photography assignments. He first photographed for Collier's Weekly, before switching to Life after he was fired by Collier's. He was the only "enemy alien" photographer for the Allies.
    From 1936 to 1939, Capa worked in Spain, photographing the Spanish Civil War, along with Gerda Taro, his companion and professional photography partner, and David Seymour.
    More Details Hide Details In 1938, he traveled to the Chinese city of Hankow, now called Wuhan, to document the resistance to the Japanese invasion.
  • TEENAGE
  • 1932
    Age 18
    Capa's first published photograph was of Leon Trotsky making a speech in Copenhagen on "The Meaning of the Russian Revolution" in 1932.
    More Details Hide Details
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1913
    Born
    He was born Endre Friedmann to the Jewish family of Júlia (née Berkovits) and Dezső Friedmann in Budapest, Austria-Hungary October 22, 1913.
    More Details Hide Details His mother, Julianna Henrietta Berkovits was a native of Nagy Kapos (now Velke Kapusany, Slovakia) and Dezső Friedmann came from the Transylvanian village of Csucsa (now Ciucea, Romania). Deciding that there was little future under the regime in Hungary after World War I, he left home at 18. Capa originally wanted to be a writer; however, he found work in photography in Berlin and grew to love the art. In 1933, he moved from Germany to France because of the rise of Nazism, and persecution of Jewish journalists and photographers, but found it difficult to find work as a freelance journalist. He had to conceal his Jewish name (Friedmann), and adopted the name "Robert Capa" around this time. Cápa ("shark") was his nickname in school and he felt that it would be recognizable and American-sounding, since it was similar to that of film director Frank Capra. He found it easier to sell his photos under the newly adopted "American"-sounding name. Over a period of time, he gradually assumed the persona of Robert Capa (with the help of his girlfriend Gerda Taro, who acted as an intermediary with those who purchased the photos taken by the "great American photographer, Robert Capa").
Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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