Robert Lawson
Architect
Robert Lawson
Robert Arthur Lawson was one of New Zealand's pre-eminent 19th century architects. It has been said he did more than any other designer to shape the face of the Victorian era architecture of the city of Dunedin. He is the architect of over forty churches, including First Church for which he is best remembered, but also other buildings, such as Larnach Castle, a country house, with which he is also associated.
Biography
Robert Lawson's personal information overview.
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News
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Double Shooting Suspects Plead NOT GUILTY - CIproud.com
Google News - over 5 years
A second man, 24 year old Robert Lawson is also charged with attempted murder, aggravated battery and unlawful use of a weapon. The arrests were made by the city's violent crime task force. Lawson, whose being held on two million dollars bond,
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Two Peoria Men Indicted for Double Shooting - CIproud.com
Google News - over 5 years
A second suspect, 24 year old Robert Lawson is also charged with attempted murder, aggravated battery and unlawful use of a weapon. The arrests were made by the city's violent crimes task force which was formed to investigate a recent rash of shootings
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Death, Alice Edith Kugler - York News-Times
Google News - over 5 years
Robert) Lawson and their children Kayelynn, Samuel, and Emma of Escondido, Calif., Jared (Claire) Beckmann and their daughter Grace of Lincoln, Andrew Kugler of San Jose, Calif., Lisa (Brandan) Turner of Waverly and Timothy (Susanne) Beckmann and their
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Los pingüinos del señor Popper de Richard y Florence Atwater - Estereofonica
Google News - over 5 years
... es un clásico infantil de los años treinta que invita a los lectores a imaginar, a soñar ya creer que todo es posible. Es el libro ganador del Newbery Honor y el Lewis Carroll Shelf Award, con ilustraciones de Robert Lawson, ganador del Newbery Medal
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The Weekly Challenger Salutes The Making Of Dr. King's National Memorial A Reality - Weekly Challenger
Google News - over 5 years
Deceased founding members are Dr. Fred Alsup, Dr. Orion Ayer, Roger Danley, Noah Gaines, Ralph James, Robert Lawson, Grant McCray, Dean Mohr, Samuel Robinson, Robert Simmons, William Thompson and Dr. Ralph Wimbish. To further memorialize the King
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What's Selling at Blue Willow Bookshop - Publishers Weekly
Google News - over 5 years
Long's retro illustrations remind us of Robert Lawson's art in The Story of Ferdinand. With the cutest plush Otis from MerryMakers, this has been a hit for us. It makes a wonderful toddler gift. Another picture book that is selling well is This Plus
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Alleged shoplifter cut by razor blades used to open packages - Richmond Register
Google News - over 5 years
The items, including a 52-inch television taken from the home in rural northeastern Madison County, were valued at about $3900, KSP Trooper Albert LaGrange said Wednesday during a preliminary hearing for William Robert Lawson, 33, and Brian Keith Webb,
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Man in women's bathroom charged with voyeurism - KOMO News
Google News - over 5 years
Geoffrey Robert Lawson, 46, could face up to five years in prison and a $10000 fine if found guilty of the felony charge. Lawson is a level three registered sex offender who was convicted of voyeurism in 2009 in King County, according to court records
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Accusations of impropriety rock Pam Bondi's office - Orlando Sentinel
Google News - over 5 years
Spark also cited email showing that Bondi's current head of the economic crimes unit, Robert Lawson, had intervened to quickly settle a case that had been opened on a Tampa car dealership represented by Robert Shimberg, a former associate of Bondi's in
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Campus news - Wausau Daily Herald
Google News - over 5 years
Edgar: Eric Reichenbach and Heather Wirkus; Marathon: Wendy Hilmershausen; Merrill: Jacob Anderson, Zachary Andreski, Brianna Czech, Aaron Erickson and Ryan Heath; Mosinee: Robert Lawson, Amy Maguire, Brooke Maguire, Abigail Rosine, Hannah Ruplinger,
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Choked out - Pasadena Weekly
Google News - over 5 years
“I keep hearing I have the right to smoke,” said 20-year smoker Robert Lawson, 43, who works as a caretaker in Pasadena. “It seems like everybody is doing everything they can to take away smokers' rights. What about us? It's illegal to smoke in your
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Learning how to care and love - Catholic Leader
Google News - over 5 years
The gift is from a famous explorer, Admiral Drake, who is Mr Popper's hero, and from this fanciful beginning Mr Popper and his family embark on a charming, offbeat adventure, beautifully illustrated by Robert Lawson, which has over generations become
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Couple Accused of International Kidnapping Surrender in Red Bank - Patch.com
Google News - over 5 years
According to a release, Fishman credited the FBI's Red Bank Resident Agency, under the direction of Special Agent in Charge Michael B. Ward in Newark, and the Lakewood Police Department, under the direction of Chief Robert Lawson,
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Club sports - The Casa Grande Bronco 12-and-under All-Stars - TriValley Central
Google News - over 5 years
Pictured are (front row, from left): Christian Rodriguez, Colin Herbert, Alex Hilt, Gage Rice, Alejandro Chavez, John Robert Lawson Jr., RJ Leos; (middle row) Nick Sisney, Jose Sanchez, Kobe Mitchell, Andy Garcia, Bradan Eberhardt, Tyler Wente,
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Homenageado no Anima Mundi, Saldanha já estuda ideias para 'Rio 2' - G1.com.br
Google News - over 5 years
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Codexis to Present at the Pacific Crest and Canaccord Genuity Conferences - MarketWatch (press release)
Google News - over 5 years
Robert Lawson, Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer, will appear on a panel titled "Crude Alternatives: Ramping Production of Biofuels and Renewable Chemicals," scheduled for August 8 at 12:30 pm ET. A webcast is not being provided for
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Warning of 'terrible attraction' of cooling dip as boy drowns in loch - Scotsman
Google News - over 5 years
Just five days before Patrick's death, Robert Lawson, 23, drowned while swimming in Kirkleegreen reservoir near Lochwinnoch. Describing the teen's death as a "tragedy," Dennis Agnew, provost of West Dunbartonshire Council, said: "Unfortunately,
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A few books to awaken your fifth-grader's inner reader - OCRegister
Google News - over 5 years
I bet I will get lots of emails with titles I didn't include, but here are some more traditional titles your child may have read in class (but if he didn't, he might enjoy): Ben and Me by Robert Lawson, Sign of the Beaver by Elizabeth George Speare,
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Robert Lawson
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 1902
    Age 69
    The Lawson - Salmond partnership would not last long. In 1902 Lawson died suddenly at Pleasant Point, Canterbury, on 3 December.
    More Details Hide Details By the time of his death he had begun to re-establish his reputation, having been elected vice-president of the Otago Institute of Architects. Robert Lawson was chiefly an architect of his time, designing in the styles then popular. The British emigrants to the colonies wanted architecture to remind them of home, and thus it is not surprising that Lawson's most notable buildings are all in a form of Gothic. Many, such as Larnach Castle and Seacliff Asylum, have been described as Scottish baronial; however, this is not an accurate description, although that particular form of Gothic may have been at times his inspiration. Lawson's particular skill was mixing various forms of similar architecture to create a building that was in its own way unique, rather than a mere pastiche of an earlier style; having achieved this, he then went on to adapt his architecture to accommodate the climate and materials locally available. Local stone and wood were particular favourites of his, especially the good quality limestone of Oamaru, and these were often used in preference to the excellent bricks equally available. Small Gothic Lancet windows were often avoided and replaced by large bay windows, allowing the rooms to be flooded with light rather than creating the darker interiors of true Gothic buildings. Larnach Castle has often been criticised as being clumsy and incongruous, but this derives from the persistent misinterpretation of Lawson's work as Scottish baronial.
  • 1900
    Age 67
    In 1900, at the age of 67, Lawson came out of his ten-year-long self-imposed exile from New Zealand and returned to Dunedin.
    More Details Hide Details Here he entered into practice with his former pupil J.Louis Salmond. A number of commercial and residential buildings were erected under their joint names, including the brick house known as "Threave" built for Watson Shennan at 367 High Street. This is one of Lawson's last works. Threave has particularly ornate carved verandahs in the Gothic style, but is today better known for its gardens than architecture.
  • 1898
    Age 65
    While serving as New Zealand's Minister of Finance and of Mines in 1898, he committed suicide in a committee room of the parliamentary building in Wellington, not because of the financial stresses of the Colonial Bank, as previously thought but because of circulating rumours about an affair between his eldest son and his third wife.
    More Details Hide Details Otago Boys' High School, Arthur Street, Dunedin, was completed in 1885. Often referred to as Gothic, in fact it is a hybrid of several orders of architecture with obvious renaissance/Tudor style, and Gothic influences: the nearest style into which it can be categorised is probably Jacobethan (a peculiarly English form of the Neo-Renaissance). The building has long been regarded as one of the finest examples of architecture in Dunedin, built of stone with many window embrasures and corners of lighter quoins. The school's many turrets and towers led to the architect Nathaniel Wales describing it in 1890 as "a semi-ecclesiastical building" in the "Domestic Tudor style of medieval architecture". The building, though castle-like, is not truly castellated although some of the windows are surmounted by crennelated ornament. Its highest point, the dominating tower, is decorated by stone balustrading. The tower has turrets at each corner — an overall composition more redolent of the early 17th-century English Renaissance than an earlier true castle. While the school's entrance arch was obviously designed to impart an ecclesiastical or collegiate air, the school has the overall appearance of a prosperous Victorian country house
  • 1897
    Age 64
    Commercial buildings which survive from Lawson's Melbourne years include the Moran and Cato warehouse in Fitzroy and the College Church in Parkville, which were completed in 1897.
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  • FIFTIES
  • 1890
    Age 57
    As the mansion's foundation stone was laid in 1890, the same year as Lawson's return to Melbourne, it seems likely that Grey had begun to work on the plans before Lawson joined him, especially as the land had been purchased in order to build the mansion two years earlier.
    More Details Hide Details There are several touches in the design which are almost certainly Lawson's - the Corinthian portico is similar to that designed by him for the National Bank at Oamaru, but here it is extended and flanked by the two-storeyed verandahs that Lawson used at Larnach Castle. Unlike this earlier construction at Earlsbrea, they are elegantly represented in stone and unglazed. The cost of construction to the owner Collier McCracken was £35,000; it later sold in 1911 for just £6000.
    After a short period assisting the Wellington architect William Turnbull in 1890, he returned to Melbourne.
    More Details Hide Details In the final period of his life, following his fall from grace in New Zealand, Lawson rarely designed alone. In Melbourne, he entered into partnership with the architect Frederick Grey. Together they designed Earlsbrae Hall, a large neoclassical house at Essendon, Victoria. This is now considered by some experts to be one of his greatest works. Often said to resemble a Grecian temple, this mansion is actually more closely related in style to the neo-Palladian architecture that evolved in the southern plantation houses of North America in the late 18th and early 19th centuries. While Lawson was undoubtedly involved in the design, it is impossible to distinguish his input from that of Grey.
  • FORTIES
  • 1874
    Age 41
    Between 1874 and 1884 Lawson worked on the design and construction of the Seacliff Lunatic Asylum, designed to house five-hundred patients and fifty staff.
    More Details Hide Details On its completion it was New Zealand's largest building. Old photographs show a huge, grandiose building loosely in the Gothic style, but with an almost Neuschwanstein quality. It was later said of the design that "the Victorians might not have wanted their lunatics living with them, but they liked to house them grandly". Architecturally this was Lawson at his most exuberant, extravagant and adventurous: Otago Boys High School seems almost severe and restrained in comparison. Turrets on corbels project from nearly every corner; the gabled roof line is dominated by a mammoth tower complete with further turrets and a spire. The vast edifice contained four and a half million bricks made of local clay on site, and was 225 metres long by 67 metres (740 by 220 feet) wide. The great tower, actually designed so that the inmates could be observed should they attempt to escape, was almost tall.
  • THIRTIES
  • 1871
    Age 38
    This building, completed in 1871, is one of Lawson's successful exercises into classical architecture, designed in a near Palladian style.
    More Details Hide Details A perfectly proportioned portico prostyle, its pediment supported by four Corinthian columns, projects from a square building of five bays, the three central bays being behind the portico. The temple-like portico gives the impression of entering a pantheon rather than a bank. The proportions of the main facade of this building display a Palladian symmetry, almost worthy of Palladio himself; however, unlike a true Palladian design, the two floors of the bank are of equal value, only differentiated by the windows of the ground floor being round-topped, while those above are the same size but have flat tops. Of all Lawson's classical designs, the National Bank is perhaps the most conventional in terms of adherence to classical rules of architecture as defined in Palladio's I Quattro Libri dell'Architettura. As his career progressed he became more adventurous in his classical designs, not always with the harmony and success he achieved at the National Bank.
    Lawson designed several large private houses, the best known was at first called "The Camp". Today it is better remembered as Larnach Castle. It was built in 1871 for William Larnach, a local businessman and politician recalled for his bravura personal style.
    More Details Hide Details It has been hailed as one of New Zealand's finest mansions, described on its completion as: "doubtless the most princely, as it is the most substantial and elegant residence in New Zealand". There is a tradition that Larnach designed his house after Castle Forbes, his father's house at Baroona in Australia. The plans, however, are unquestionably from Lawson's office. The origin of the myth is simply that Larnach Castle has verandahs, doubtless insisted on by Larnach, an obviously colonial addition to its otherwise conventional revivalist design. However these do lend it distinction. Although some have questioned if Larnach Castle was an essay in the revived Scottish baronial manner. The main facade resembles a small, castellated tower house, with the characteristic rubble masonry, turrets and battlements, present at Abbotsford, an exemplar of the style. It has been accurately described as a "castellated villa wrapped in a two storey verandah". The principal facade is dominated by a central tower complete with a stair turret which gives the house its castle-like appearance.
  • 1864
    Age 31
    In his work on First Church, Lawson had met Jessie Sinclair Hepburn, whose father George Hepburn was the second session clerk of the building. The couple married in November 1864 and subsequently had three daughters and a son.
    More Details Hide Details Throughout his life Lawson remained a devout Presbyterian, becoming an elder and session clerk of First Church like his father-in-law. He was also closely involved in the Sunday school movement. Although much of Lawson's early work has since been either demolished or heavily altered, surviving plans and photographs from the period suggest that the buildings he was working on at this time included a variety of styles. Indeed, Lawson designed principally in both the classical and Gothic styles simultaneously throughout his career. His style and manner of architecture can best be explained through an examination of six of his designs, three Gothic and three in the classical style, and each an individual interpretation and use of their common designated style. The British Protestant religions were at this period still heavily influenced by the Anglo-Catholic Oxford Movement, which had decreed Gothic as the only architectural style suited for Christian worship; Greek, Roman, and Italian renaissance architecture was viewed as "pagan" and inappropriate in the design of churches. Thus Lawson was never given opportunities such as Francis Petre enjoyed when the latter recreated great Italianate renaissance basilicas such as the Cathedral of the Blessed Sacrament in Christchurch. Dunedin had in fact been founded, only thirteen years before Lawson's arrival, by the Free Church of Scotland, a denomination not known for its love of ornament and decoration, and certainly not the architecture of the more Catholic countries.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1862
    Age 29
    Lawson entered the competition, using the pseudonym "Presbyter". If this pseudonym was designed to catch the eye of the Presbyterian judges, it was well chosen: his design was successful. Thus Lawson was able in 1862 to move to Dunedin and open an architectural practice.
    More Details Hide Details First Church was finally completed in 1874. During the period of construction Lawson was commissioned to design other churches, public buildings, and houses in the vicinity.
  • 1858
    Age 25
    In Steiglitz he designed the Free Church school and in 1858 a Catholic school.
    More Details Hide Details As Lawson came to realise the low probability of success in the gold rush and the precariousness of a career in journalism, he decided to return full-time to his first chosen career and found a position as an architect in Melbourne. In 1861, the first Otago gold rush brought an influx of people to southern New Zealand, including a new generation. In January 1862, a competition was held to design First Church - a cathedral-like place of worship to serve as the principal Presbyterian church in the rapidly expanding settlement. Dunedin became New Zealand's commercial capital in the 1870s and 80s.
  • 1854
    Age 21
    Aged 21, he emigrated first to Melbourne on 15 July 1854, on the ship Tongataboo.
    More Details Hide Details Like other new arrivals in Australia, he tried many new occupations, including goldmining and journalism. During this period he occasionally turned his hand to architecture.
    Born at Newburgh, in Fife, Scotland, he emigrated in 1854 to Australia and then in 1862 to New Zealand.
    More Details Hide Details He died aged 69 in Canterbury, New Zealand. Lawson is acclaimed for his work in both the Gothic revival and classical styles of architecture. He was prolific, and while isolated buildings remain in Scotland and Australia, it is in the Dunedin area that most surviving examples can now be found. Today he is held in high esteem in his adopted country. However, at the time of his death his reputation and architectural skills were still held in contempt by many following the partial collapse of his Seacliff Lunatic Asylum, at the time New Zealand's largest building. In 1900, shortly before his death, he returned to New Zealand from a self-imposed, ten-year exile to re-establish his name, but his sudden demise prevented a full rehabilitation of his reputation. The great plaudits denied him in his lifetime were not to come until nearly a century after his death, when the glories of Victorian architecture began again to be recognised and appreciated.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1833
    Age 0
    Born in 1833.
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