Robert Morrison
first Protestant missionary in China
Robert Morrison
Robert Morrison, FRS was an Anglo -Scottish evangelist and the first Christian Protestant missionary in China. After twenty-five years of work he translated the whole Bible into the Chinese language and baptized ten Chinese believers. Morrison pioneered the translation of the Bible into Chinese and planned for the distribution of the Scriptures as broadly as possible, unlike the previous Roman Catholic translation work that had never been published.
Biography
Robert Morrison's personal information overview.
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Shaving by Candlelight - Family Research Council (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Did that 12-foot limb from the oak in my back yard actually fall on my head when Irene blew through? I have never before agreed with an editorial in the Washington Post. This time, though, I have to agree with them: the Washington
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Engineer firm falls - NTNews.com.au
Google News - over 5 years
The company was founded in 1997 by Darren Hardy, Robert Morrison, Neville Walker and Leo Venturin. "It's sad to hear the place has closed," Mr Hardy said. Fingers Specialised Metal Fabrication is still advertising for workers despite tough times
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Carpooling with George Washington - Family Research Council (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Commuting to Washington, DC can be nerve-wracking on the best of days. But when the hour-long commute drags on for more than two hours—as it did this week on the day of our earthquake—it might be especially trying
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Washington Post's Ombudsman Goes “Populist” - Family Research Council (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
I read in a recent issue of the Washington Post that the newspaper's future is being firmly staked on going “populist.” (I scan the Post, dear reader, so you don't have to.) The column ran on the editorial page of the capital's
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Fire Engulfs Mineola Pool Snack Stand - Patch.com
Google News - over 5 years
Robert Morrison A small fire broke out at the Wilson Park snack stand Friday morning at around 10:30 am, engulfing much of the concession area in flame. The fire, described as a 'signal 10,' appeared to have started in the deep fryer on the southern
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Jesus Behind Bars - American Thinker
Google News - over 5 years
I looked forward to the day eagerly. My friend Phil, an international businessman, and I would make the trek north to see Jim, a prisoner. We've done it repeatedly over the years. It's always a chance for me to learn from Phil during
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Ex – La. Bank Employee Pleads No Contest to Theft - Insurance Journal
Google News - over 5 years
On Wednesday, District Judge Robert Morrison ordered Zahn to make restitution and fined him $2500. Morrison also gave Zahn a five-year suspended sentence, placed him on probation for five years and ordered him to sign an agreement that he will never
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The Summit: Seventy Years Later - National Review Online
Google News - over 5 years
Seventy years ago this week, British prime minister Winston Churchill crossed the U-boat-infested North Atlantic to have a top-secret rendezvous with Pres. Franklin D. Roosevelt. Churchill's vessel, the battleship HMS Prince of Wales
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A clear and present danger: The national popular vote plan - Daily Caller
Google News - over 5 years
By Ken Blackwell & Robert Morrison “Revenge is a dish best served cold” is an old French expression. Maybe American politicos ought to pay attention to the wisdom of our overseas friends. We've had almost 11 years to contemplate the 2000 election
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Let's Exorcize Ayn Rand - Wilson County News
Google News - over 5 years
How I miss William F. Buckley, Jr. He was the guardian at the gates. He kept the barbarians at bay. He published Whittaker Chambers's famous rejection of writer Ayn Rand's so-called philosophy of "Objectivism
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Property owners appeal approval of The Rock school's expansion - Gainesville Sun
Google News - over 5 years
The disagreement between the property owners, brothers Donald and Robert Morrison, and county officials does not end with the Development Review Committee's June 9 approval of a site plan that allows for a more than 4000-square-foot modular building
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Valkyrie: The Plot to Kill Hitler 20 July 1944 - Family Research Council (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
The book Valkyrie has the same name as the movie starring Tom Cruise, but it's very different. Written by Philip Freiherr von Boeselager, Valkyrie: The Story of the Plot to Kill Hitler, by Its Last Member, transports us into another
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Aviva trims life cover underwriting times - ifaonline.co.uk
Google News - over 5 years
Robert Morrison, chief underwriter for Aviva said: "When a person contacts us regarding life insurance, we want to be able to offer a decision as quickly and smoothly as possible. "If additional medical details are required this means the applicant
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Nixon and Reagan: By Their Fruits You Will Know Them - Family Research Council (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Some men want to be president to compensate for deep yearnings within, and psychological wounds. Nixon was one of these. Others seek the presidency for the good they can do in that powerful office. Reagan was one of these
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Shunting Aside the Declaration - Family Research Council (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
The Emancipation Proclamation is usually put on display only once a year. For just a few days in January's pale light, the much-faded document is offered to public view by the National Archives. When President Lincoln sat down on
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NBC's attack on America's heritage - Tbo.com
Google News - over 5 years
By Robert Morrison, Guest columnist Many Americans are aware that NBC deliberately cut out the reference to Under God during a broadcast segment of the Pledge of Allegiance during the recent US Open in Washington
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Robert Morrison
    FIFTIES
  • 1834
    Age 52
    Morrison prepared his last sermon in June 1834 on the text, "In my Father's house are many mansions."
    More Details Hide Details It was to show how much of the joy of the eternal Home would "consist in the society formed there; the family of God, from all ages and out of all nations." Even now he was entering his last illness, and his solitude was great, for his wife and family had been ordered to England. On 1 August the pioneer Protestant missionary to China died. He died at his residence: Number six at the Danish Hong in Canton (Guangzhou) at the age of 52 in his son's arms. The following day, his remains were removed to Macau, and buried in the Old Protestant Cemetery on 5 August next to his first wife and child. He left a family of six surviving children, two by his first wife, and four by his second. His only daughter was married to Benjamin Hobson, a medical missionary in 1847.
  • 1833
    Age 51
    The Roman Catholics rose against Morrison in 1833, leading to the suppression of his presses and publications and removing his preferred method of spreading knowledge of Christ.
    More Details Hide Details His native agents, however, continued to circulate publications that had already been printed. During this period Morrison also contributed to Karl Gützlaff's Eastern Western Monthly Magazine, a publication aimed at improving Sino-western understanding. In 1834 the monopoly of the East India Company on trade with China ended. Morrison's position with the Company was abolished and his means of sustenance ceased. He was subsequently appointed Government translator under Lord Napier, but only held the position for a few days.
  • 1832
    Age 50
    In 1832 Morrison could write: There is now in Canton a state of society, in respect of Chinese, totally different from what I found in 1807.
    More Details Hide Details Chinese scholars, missionary students, English presses and Chinese Scriptures, with public worship of God, have all grown up since that period. I have served my generation, and must the Lord know when I fall asleep.
  • FORTIES
  • 1826
    Age 44
    The new Mrs. Morrison and the children of his first marriage returned with him to China in 1826.
    More Details Hide Details An incident of the voyage will illustrate the perils of those days, as well as Morrison's fortitude. After a terrible spell of storm, the passengers were alarmed to hear the clanking of swords and the explosion of firearms. They soon learned that a mutiny had broken out among the seamen, who were wretchedly paid, and who had taken possession of the forepart of the vessel, with the intention of turning the cannon there against the officers of the ship. It was a critical moment. At the height of the alarm, Morrison calmly walked forward among the mutineers, and, after some earnest words of persuasion, induced the majority of them to return to their places; the remainder were easily captured, flogged, and put in irons. At Singapore, Morrison was confronted with fresh trials. The Singapore Institution, now Raffles Institution, which has one House named after him, had been in process of formation there, on his departure for England, similar to the college at Malacca. Little progress had been made with it. A new governor manifested less interest, and Morrison had not been present to see that the work went on. After a stay here for purposes of organization, the missionary and his family went on to Macau, and subsequently Morrison proceeded to Guangzhou, where he found that his property had been also neglected in his absence.
  • 1824
    Age 42
    Before returning to his missionary labors he was married again, in November 1824 to Eliza Armstrong, with whom he had five more children.
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    The years 1824 and 1825 were spent by Morrison in England, where he presented his Chinese Bible to King George IV, and was received by all classes with great demonstrations of respect.
    More Details Hide Details He busied himself in teaching Chinese to classes of English gentlemen and English ladies, and in stirring up interest and sympathy on behalf of China.
  • THIRTIES
  • 1812
    Age 30
    The Chinese grammar was finished in 1812, and sent to Bengal for printing, and heard no more of for three anxious, weary years for Morrison.
    More Details Hide Details But it was highly approved and well printed, and it was a pivotal piece of work done towards enabling England and America to understand China. Morrison went on to print a tract and a catechism. He translated the book of Acts into Chinese, and was overcharged to the extent of thirty pounds for the printing of a thousand copies. Then Morrison translated the Gospel of Luke, and printed it. The Roman Catholic bishop at Macau, on obtaining a copy of this latter production, ordered it to be burned as a heretical book. So to the common people it must have appeared that one set of Christians existed to destroy what the other set produced. The facts did not look favorable for the prosperity of Christianity in China. The machinery of the Chinese criminal tribunal was set in motion when the Chinese authorities read some of his printed works. Morrison was first made aware of the coming storm by the publication of an edict, directed against him and all Europeans who sought to undermine Chinese religion. Under this edict, to print and publish Christian books in Chinese was declared a capital crime. The author of any such work was warned that he would subject himself to the penalty of death. All his assistants would render themselves liable to various severe forms of punishment. The mandarins and all magistrates were enjoined to act with energy in bringing to judgment any who might be guilty of contravening this edict.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1809
    Age 27
    In 1809, he met 17-year-old Mary Morton and married her on 20 February that year in Macau.
    More Details Hide Details They had three children: James Morrison (b. 5 March 1811, died on the same day), Mary Rebecca Morrison (b. July 1812), and John Robert Morrison (b. 17 April 1814). Mary Morrison died of cholera on 10 June 1821 and is buried in the Old Protestant Cemetery in Macau. On the day of their marriage Robert Morrison was appointed translator to the East India Company with a salary of £500 a year. He returned to Guangzhou alone since foreign women were not allowed to reside there. This post afforded him, what most he needed, some real security that he would be allowed to continue at his work. He had now a definite commercial appointment, and it was one which in no way hindered the prosecution of the mission, which always stood first in his thoughts.The daily work of translation for the Company assisted him in gaining familiarity with the language, and increased his opportunities for intercourse with the Chinese. He could now go about more freely and fearlessly. Already his mastery of the Chinese tongue was admitted by those shrewd business men, who perceived its value for their own commercial negotiations.
  • 1806
    Age 24
    He traveled to visit his family and bid them farewell in July 1806, preaching 13 times in London, Edinburgh and Glasgow.
    More Details Hide Details Morrison was ordained in London on 8 January 1807 at the Scotch church on Swallow Street and was eager to go to China. On 31 January, he sailed first to America. The fact that the policy of the East India Company was not to carry missionaries, and that there were no other ships available that were bound for China, forced him to stop first in New York on 20 April after a stormy and perilous voyage aboard the "Remittance". Some have made the argument that missionaries like Morrison were a tool of Western commercial imperialism, but the general hostility that he aroused from the British commercial endeavor in China, like William Carey of India, prove that he acted independently. Morrison spent nearly a month in America. He was very anxious to secure the good offices of the American Consul at Guangzhou, as it was well known that he would need the influence of some one in authority, if he was to be permitted to stay in China. The promise of protection was made from the United States consul, and on 12 May, he boarded a second, the Trident, bound for Macau.
  • 1804
    Age 22
    He had applied to the Society in a letter dated 27 May 1804, offering himself for missionary service.
    More Details Hide Details The next day he was interviewed by the board and accepted at once without a second interview. The next year, he went to David Bogue's Academy in Gosport (near Portsmouth) for further training. For a while he was torn between Timbuktu in Africa and China as possible fields of service. His prayer was: that God would station him in that part of the missionary field where the difficulties were greatest and all to human appearances the most insurmountable. In 1798, just when the young Robert had been converted, the Rev. William Willis Moseley of Northamptonshire issued a letter urging "the establishment of a society for translating the Holy Scriptures into the languages of the populous oriental nations." He came across a manuscript of most of the New Testament translated into Chinese (probably by earlier Jesuit missionaries) in the British Museum. He immediately printed 100 copies of a further tract "on the importance of translating and publishing the Holy Scriptures into the Chinese language." Copies were sent to all the Church of England bishops and the new mission agencies. Most gave discouraging replies, giving such reasons as the cost and "utter impossibility" of spreading the books inside China. But a copy reached Dr. Bogue, the head of the Hoxton Academy. He replied that if he had been younger he would have "devoted the rest of his days to the propagation of the gospel in China".
    After his mother's death in 1804, he joined the London Missionary Society.
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  • 1803
    Age 21
    On 7 January 1803 he entered George Collison's Hoxton Academy in London and was trained as Congregationalist minister.
    More Details Hide Details He visited the poor and sick and preached in the villages around London. By the age of 17 Morrison had been moved reading about the new missionary movement in The Evangelical Magazine and The Missionary Magazine. However, he had promised his mother he would not go abroad so long as she lived and was present to care for her during her last illness, when he received her blessing to proceed.
  • TEENAGE
  • 1801
    Age 19
    Soon he wanted to become a missionary and in 1801, he started learning Latin, Greek Hebrew as well as systematic theology and shorthand from the Rev. W. Laidler, a Presbyterian minister in Newcastle, but his parents were opposed to his new vocation.
    More Details Hide Details During this period, Robert often spent free time in the garden in quiet meditation and prayer. At work, the Bible or some other book such as Matthew Henry's Commentary was open before him while his hands were busy. He regularly attended church on Sundays, visited the sick with the "Friendless Poor and Sick Society", and in his spare time during the week instructed poor children. He shared his faith in Christ with another young apprentice and to a sailor, showing a deep concern for the conversion of friends and family.
  • 1796
    Age 14
    In 1796, young Robert Morrison followed his uncle James Nicholson into apprenticeship and later joined the Presbyterian church in 1798.
    More Details Hide Details By age 14 Robert left school and was apprenticed to his father's business. For a couple of years he kept company in disregard of his Christian upbringing and fell occasionally into drunkenness. However, this behavior soon ended. In Robert's own words It was about five years ago 1798 that I was much awakened to a sense of sin … and I was brought to a serious concern about my soul. I felt the dread of eternal condemnation. The fear of death compassed me about and I was led nightly to cry to God that he would pardon my sin, that he would grant me an interest in the Savior, and that he would renew me in the spirit of my mind. Sin became a burden. It was then that I experienced a change of life, and, I trust, a change of heart, too. I broke off from my former careless company, and gave myself to reading, meditation and prayer. It pleased God to reveal his Son in me, and at that time I experienced much of the "kindness of youth and the love of espousals." And though the first flash of affection wore off, I trust my love to and knowledge of the Savior have increased.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1782
    Age 0
    Born on January 5, 1782.
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Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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