Robert Riskin
American writer
Robert Riskin
Robert Riskin was an American screenwriter and playwright, best known for his collaborations with director-producer Frank Capra.
Biography
Robert Riskin's personal information overview.
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Photo Albums
Popular photos of Robert Riskin
News
News abour Robert Riskin from around the web
Forget gold, TCM strikes platinum, blonde that is, with Carole Lombard Aug. 28 - Examiner.com
Google News - over 5 years
Following her divorce from Powell, Lombard reportedly dated actors Gary Cooper, George Raft, screenwriter Robert Riskin and singer Russ Columbo. According to biographer Larry Swindell's 1975 Lombard bio, Screwball: The Life of Carole Lombard,
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Google News article
Claudette Colbert on TCM: BOOM TOWN, PARRISH, MIDNIGHT, OUTPOST IN MALAYA - Alt Film Guide (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
But then again, Midnight wasn't nominated for a single Academy Award, whereas It Happened One Night won the top five: Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actor (Clark Gable), Best Actress (Colbert), and Best Screenplay (Robert Riskin)
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Google News article
The Frank Capra stamp -- and the Capra film that drove Baltimore nuts - Baltimore Sun (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
"American Madness" marked the fullest collaboration yet between Capra and screenwriter Robert Riskin -- their most beloved movies include "It Happened One Night" and "Mr. Deeds Goes to Town." Their notion of a gutsy idealist galvanizing the good faith
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Google News article
THE OSCARS; They Really Like Me
NYTimes - about 7 years
ONLY three men (and, needless to say, no women) have won more than two Oscars for directing: Frank Capra, John Ford and William Wyler. A look at their winners -- all have been issued on home video, though ''The Best Years of Our Lives'' is out of print -- suggests how the taste of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences has developed since
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NYTimes article
Remembering Fay Wray: 96 Years, Many Movies and the Big Ape on the Building
NYTimes - over 12 years
The card that came with the lilies sitting in a vase on the concession stand at Film Forum read: ''Fay -- We will never forget you. From everyone at the Empire State Building.'' Architects and Donald Trump aside, there are very few people who would be honored by a building; one of them, of course, is Fay Wray, who died last month. The obituaries
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Hollywood Screenwriters Weigh a Real-Life Revolution at the Ballot Box
NYTimes - over 12 years
By Tuesday morning Hollywood screenwriters, working without a contract for the last half year, will have decided whether they are ripe for revolution. Under the eye of the Labor Department, the 8,000-member Writers Guild of America, West, is to conclude on Monday night a mostly mail-in election to choose a president and 8 of 16 board members. The
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NYTimes article
Fay Wray, Star Who Stole Kong's Heart, Dies at 96
NYTimes - over 12 years
Fay Wray, an actress who appeared in about 100 movies but whose fame is inextricably linked with the hours she spent struggling, helplessly screaming, in the eight-foot hand of King Kong, died on Sunday at her apartment in Manhattan. She was 96. Rick McKay, a director and her friend, said she died peacefully in her sleep. He recalled that Miss
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Head of Writers Guild Unit Quits After Eligibility Inquiry
NYTimes - about 13 years
The president of one of Hollywood's leading unions, the Writers Guild of America, West, resigned early Tuesday morning after a 13-hour meeting of the union's board of directors that was called to debate her eligibility to hold her office. Around 4:30 a.m. the president, Victoria Riskin, who was re-elected in September to a second two-year term,
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NYTimes article
MEDIA BUSINESS; Report Backs Overturning Of Election at Writers Guild
NYTimes - about 13 years
The president of the Writers Guild of America, the union that represents Hollywood screenwriters, was ineligible to run for re-election in September, an independent investigator decided on Monday, recommending that the election be overturned, according to several people who have read the decision. The action came on the same day that a screenwriter
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FILM REVIEW; Full Pockets, Big City
NYTimes - over 14 years
It could be said that the remake of Frank Capra's ''Mr. Deeds Goes to Town,'' starring Adam Sandler, is redundant, since the actor has been remaking Capraesque movies for most of his career. Mr. Sandler's films are always about the arrogant getting a deserved comeuppance at the hands of humbler types, but this is the first time he seems a little
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Sticking to the Script
NYTimes - over 15 years
To the Editor: In his review of Maria DiBattista's ''Fast-Talking Dames'' (June 3), Robert Gottlieb quotes DiBattista as saying, ''When film found its human voice, it simultaneously gave to the American woman . . . a chance to speak her mind, to have a real, not just a presumptive, say in her own destiny.'' May one point out that those breakthrough
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MOVIE GUIDE
NYTimes - about 17 years
Here is a selective listing by critics of The Times of new or noteworthy movies and film series playing this weekend in New York City. * denotes a highly recommended film or series. Ratings and running times are in parentheses. An index of reviews of films opening today appears on Page 12. Now Playing * ''AMERICAN MOVIE,'' featuring Mark Borchardt
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HOLIDAY FILMS: SCREEN GEMS; It Happened With One Movie: A Studio Transformed
NYTimes - over 17 years
''IT HAPPENED ONE NIGHT'' almost didn't. Only days before shooting was to begin, this 1934 screwball comedy, now a classic, lacked a leading lady. Established draws like Myrna Loy, Margaret Sullavan, Miriam Hopkins and Constance Bennett had all passed on playing the role of the runaway heiress who falls for a newspaperman during a cross-country bus
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Odd Man In
NYTimes - about 19 years
Frank Capra's sunny but soulful comedy MR. DEEDS GOES TO TOWN (1936), about Longfellow Deeds, the tuba-playing poet laureate of Mandrake Falls, Vt., who inherits a fortune and comes to Manhattan, was a huge Depression-hit and an instant classic. Gary Cooper as the naive but noble provincial protagonist proves his mettle, charming a formidable city
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SPOTLIGHT; Capra's Everyman
NYTimes - over 19 years
The director Frank Capra, with a script by Robert Riskin, again presents an honest and forthright fellow who believes in the innate goodness of people and has the courage to fight for his principles. In MEET JOHN DOE (1941), a brilliant fable of Depression-era America, an idealistic drifter (Gary Cooper) plays the role of a cynical firebrand for
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DIARY
NYTimes - almost 20 years
DAUGHTERS AT WORK Hopes, Not Sweatshops For many girls, Take Our Daughters to Work Day is a joyous, silly, possibly inspiring once-a-year event. For others, it is not a lark at all -- no giddy photocopying of hands or, perhaps, shoes at Dad's office -- but a day-in, day-out grind, because some girls spend their days shut up in New York garment
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NYTimes article
Yesterday's Stars Lobby for Writers
NYTimes - almost 20 years
In the basement of the Hart Senate Office Building, in the artificial light and clatter of the cafeteria, Fay Wray, 89, was preparing for her next scene. The legendary actress, the luminescent object of King Kong's desire, took out a mirror from her purse. She uncorked her lipstick, ''Really Red,'' and swiped her lips. Beaming, she was ready for
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NYTimes article
FILM; Kong and Wray: 60 Years of Love
NYTimes - almost 24 years
Gorillas have a life expectancy of 30 years. King Kong was created out of wire, cloth, metal, rubber and stop-motion photography 60 years ago, and he may well turn out to be immortal. At 85 and facing her own end within a decade or two, Fay Wray is aware that her immortality is inextricably linked with the huge ape who held her in his eight-foot
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NYTimes article
It Wasn't Such a Wonderful Life
NYTimes - almost 25 years
FRANK CAPRA The Catastrophe of Success. By Joseph McBride. Illustrated. 768 pp. New York: Simon & Schuster. $27.50. PROBABLY no film maker ever dominated an era the way Frank Capra dominated his. During the 1930's, at the peak of his powers and his success, he won three Academy Awards and was Hollywood's most highly paid director. He also served as
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NYTimes article
Critic's Notebook; Early Capra, When He Had An Edge
NYTimes - almost 25 years
FOR many people, Frank Capra will always be Santa Claus, the Easter Bunny and Clarence the Angel rolled into one, the director who can make grown men cry at "It's a Wonderful Life" and political cynics cheer at "Mr. Smith Goes to Washington." I'm more partial to an earlier Capra scene, in which Barbara Stanwyck jumps off a yacht in the wee morning
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NYTimes article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Robert Riskin
    FIFTIES
  • 1955
    Age 57
    The Los Angeles Examiner covered Riskin’s funeral in September 1955, describing the “notables” in attendance.
    More Details Hide Details The report also identified the “one man who wasn’t there”: Frank Capra did not attend Robert Riskin’s funeral. In 1961, Capra directed A Pocketful of Miracles, a remake of Capra and Riskin's 1933 collaboration Lady for a Day, with a screenplay by Hal Kanter and Harry Tugend from the Riskin-Runyon material. It was Capra's last film.
  • FORTIES
  • 1945
    Age 47
    Riskin returned to Hollywood in 1945, with the screenplay for The Thin Man Goes Home He had an uncredited collaboration on the 1946 film noir classic The Strange Love of Martha Ivers.
    More Details Hide Details Riskin and his brother Everett formed their own film company. Their first film, the minor James Stewart hit Magic Town (1946), was written and produced by Riskin, who also directed initially. The directing was finished by William A. Wellman. Magic Town has a similar flavor and tone to Riskin's Capra-directed films. In 1950, Riskin suffered a debilitating stroke which left him unable to write. Riskin had completed the screenplay for Half Angel (1951) and the story for Here Comes the Groom (1951) before the stroke. Ironically, Capra was assigned to direct Here Comes the Groom, and Riskin received a fifth Academy Award nomination for it.
  • 1942
    Age 44
    Riskin married actress Fay Wray in 1942.
    More Details Hide Details They had three children: Susan (born 1936), Robert (born 1943), and Victoria (born 1946). (Susan was the child of Wray's first marriage and was adopted by Riskin in 1942.) They remained married until his death. George Jessel read the eulogy at Riskin's funeral. Interment was at Inglewood Park Cemetery, Inglewood, California. Riskin’s older brother, Everett (born 1895), was a Hollywood film producer (1934–52). He produced many noteworthy films, including The Thin Man Goes Home, written by Robert. A biography by Ian Scott, In Capra's Shadow: The Life and Career of Screenwriter Robert Riskin, was published in 2006 by the University Press of Kentucky. Won: Nominated:
    Riskin then became an associate producer for Samuel Goldwyn. When the U.S. entered World War II, he joined the Office of War Information in 1942, where he organized the OWI's overseas division.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1939
    Age 41
    Riskin joined Capra in an independent production company in 1939, but they fell out in 1941.
    More Details Hide Details
  • THIRTIES
  • 1931
    Age 33
    He moved to Hollywood in 1931 after Columbia Pictures bought the screen rights to several of his plays.
    More Details Hide Details His first collaboration with director Frank Capra was the Barbara Stanwyck vehicle The Miracle Woman (1931). Riskin wrote several films for Columbia, but it was his string of hits with Capra that brought him acclaim. Riskin received Academy Award nominations for his screenplays and stories for five Capra films: Lady for a Day (1933), which Riskin had adapted from a Damon Runyon short story; It Happened One Night (1934), for which he won the Oscar; Mr. Deeds Goes to Town (1936) with Gary Cooper and Jean Arthur; You Can't Take It with You (1938) with Lionel Barrymore and James Stewart; and Here Comes the Groom (1951) with Bing Crosby and Jane Wyman.
  • 1929
    Age 31
    Riskin continued his Broadway career until the 1929 stock market crash and the Great Depression caused many theatres to close.
    More Details Hide Details Motion pictures had just adopted sound, and writers were needed who could write dialogue and were experienced with stage work. Riskin recognized he had the credentials and seized the opportunity by relocating to Hollywood.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1897
    Born
    Born on March 30, 1897.
    More Details Hide Details
Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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