Rosalind Russell
Actress
Rosalind Russell
Rosalind Russell was an American actress of stage and screen, perhaps best known for her role as a fast-talking newspaper reporter in the Howard Hawks screwball comedy His Girl Friday, as well as the role of Mame Dennis in the film Auntie Mame. She won all 5 Golden Globes for which she was nominated, and was tied with Meryl Streep for wins until 2007 when Streep was awarded a sixth.
Biography
Rosalind Russell's personal information overview.
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Popular photos of Rosalind Russell
News
News abour Rosalind Russell from around the web
Police storm Libyan embassy in Bulgarian capital - Reuters Africa
Google News - over 5 years
... earlier on Friday, the spokeswoman said, and was waiting to be granted access to the embassy. The new envoy has yet to present his credentials and receive official diplomatic accreditation. (Reporting by Tsvetelia Tsolova, editing by Rosalind Russell)
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Let's hear it for favorite movie lines - Orlando Sentinel
Google News - over 5 years
Rosalind Russell, "Auntie Mame" "Hey, Vazquez, have you ever been mistaken for a man?" Bill Paxton to buff Jenette Goldstein in "Aliens." Her reply: "No, have you?" "Would you do me a favor, Harry? … Drop dead!" Judy Holliday to Broderick Crawford in
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Bat tests positive for Espanola - Midnorth Monitor
Google News - over 5 years
The Canadian Food Inspection Agency has notified the Sudbury & District Health Unit Health that two bats have tested positive for rabies. The bats were found dead in homes in Espanola and Chelmsford. While bats are very helpful in
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If Cinderella Had a BlackBerry...
NYTimes - over 5 years
If Aline Brosh McKenna were to write a script about her life, it might open with McKenna, wavy-haired and underdressed, hopefully showing her work to a series of unsmiling magazine editors in New York. Discouraged but not defeated, she eventually screws up her resolve and decides to take a course in screenwriting. Cut to a classroom where student
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Music is his medicine - San Francisco Chronicle
Google News - over 5 years
Engleman, who still works as director of the Rosalind Russell Medical Research Center for Arthritis at UCSF, started playing violin at the age of 5 - almost two decades before his parents urged him to seek a career in medicine instead of music
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What's On Today
NYTimes - over 5 years
9 P.M. (Current TV) 50 DOCUMENTARIES TO SEE BEFORE YOU DIE Morgan Spurlock (''Super Size Me''), above, is the host of this five-part series, which counts down 50 of the most powerful documentaries from the past 25 years. He also takes to the road to revisit the people featured in films like ''Paris Is Burning,'' ''Hoop Dreams'' and ''Exit Through
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The Five | Media meets Hollywood - Louisville Courier-Journal
Google News - over 5 years
“His Girl Friday” (1940) — Cary Grant and Rosalind Russell are at their best as exes who flirt, bicker and (naturally) fall in love with each other again. Grant plays a hard-driving editor who'll do whatever he must to get his Russell, his ex-wife and
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Michael Schur walks us through Parks And Recreation's third season (Part 4 of 4) - A.V. Club
Google News - over 5 years
But from history or something, I think, like, if Rosalind Russell were still around, I think she'd be a good choice based on His Girl Friday. Bette Davis would have been good. Anybody who was very powerful onscreen and very no-nonsense
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Kicking up a storm: 2011 soccer wrap-up - Midnorth Monitor
Google News - over 5 years
The Espanola minor soccer season wrapped up this past weekend. There were 240 children in all who took part in this year's season. League president, Lynne Gibson, shared some of the highlights of the year
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Rosalind Russell
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 1976
    Age 68
    Russell died of breast cancer on November 28, 1976.
    More Details Hide Details She was survived by her husband and her son. She is buried in Holy Cross Cemetery in Culver City, California. Rosalind Russell has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, at 1708 Vine Street. Her autobiography, written with Chris Chase, Life Is a Banquet, was published a year after her death. The foreword (written by her husband) states that Russell had a mental breakdown in 1943. She made no films in 1944. Details are scant, but the book indicates that health problems and the deaths of a sister and a brother were major factors leading to her breakdown. Russell had rheumatoid arthritis, and the UCSF Arthritis Research Center currently bears her name. In 2009, a documentary film Life Is a Banquet: The Life of Rosalind Russell, narrated by Kathleen Turner, was shown at film festivals across the U.S. and on some PBS stations.
  • 1972
    Age 64
    She received a Special Academy Award, the Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award, in 1972, which came with an Oscar statuette.
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  • FIFTIES
  • 1966
    Age 58
    Russell was the logical choice for reprising her role as Auntie Mame when its Broadway musical adaptation Mame was set for production in 1966, but she declined for health reasons.
    More Details Hide Details In addition to her acting career, Russell also wrote the story (under the name C. A. McKnight) for the film The Unguarded Moment (1956), a story of sexual harassment starring Esther Williams.
  • 1958
    Age 50
    Patrick Dennis dedicated his second Auntie Mame book Around the World with Auntie Mame to "the one and only Rosalind Russell" in 1958.
    More Details Hide Details She continued to appear in movies through the mid-1960s, including Picnic (1955), A Majority of One (1961), Five Finger Exercise (1962), Gypsy (1962), and The Trouble with Angels (1966).
    Perhaps her most memorable performance was in the title role of the long-running stage hit Auntie Mame and the subsequent 1958 movie version, in which she played an eccentric aunt whose orphaned nephew comes to live with her.
    More Details Hide Details When asked with which role she was most closely identified, she replied that strangers who spotted her still called out, "Hey, Auntie Mame!" She received a Tony Award nomination for Best Actress in a Play in 1957 for her performance.
    Russell reprised her starring role for a 1958 television special.
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  • THIRTIES
  • 1941
    Age 33
    On October 25, 1941, Russell married Danish-American producer Frederick Brisson, son of actor Carl Brisson.
    More Details Hide Details Cary Grant was responsible for the couple having met, and was the best man at Frederick and Rosalind's wedding. Brisson had been traveling from England to the United States by ship in 1939, and The Women was playing on an endless loop during the voyage. After hearing the audio for the film day after day while traveling, Brisson decided he had better sit down and watch the whole film. He became so enamored with Russell's performance as Sylvia Fowler that he turned to his friends and proclaimed: "I'm either gonna kill that girl, or I'm gonna marry her." (Or so he liked to say.) Brisson stayed with Cary Grant in his guest house while Grant was filming His Girl Friday. Upon hearing that Grant was making the movie with Russell, Brisson asked his friend if he could meet her. Cary Grant then spent weeks greeting Russell each morning on set with the question, "Have you met Freddie Brisson?" in an effort to pique the actress's curiosity. One night, when Russell opened her door to let Grant in before they went dancing, as they often did, she found him standing next to a stranger. Grant sheepishly explained that the odd fellow was Freddie Brisson, the man whom he had mentioned so often, and they set off for dinner, with Freddie in tow. Russell and Brisson's marriage lasted 35 years, ending with her death.
  • 1939
    Age 31
    In 1939, she was cast as catty gossip Sylvia Fowler in the all-female comedy The Women, directed by George Cukor.
    More Details Hide Details The film was a major hit, boosting her career and establishing her reputation as a comedian. Russell continued to display her talent for comedy in the classic screwball comedy His Girl Friday (1940), directed by Howard Hawks. In the film, a reworking of Ben Hecht's story The Front Page, Russell played quick-witted ace reporter Hildy Johnson, who was also the ex-wife of her newspaper editor Walter Burns (Cary Grant). Russell had been, as she put it, "Everyone's fifteenth choice" for the role of Hildy in the film. Prior to her being cast, Howard Hawks had asked Katharine Hepburn, Irene Dunne, Claudette Colbert, Jean Arthur, Margaret Sullavan, and Ginger Rogers if they would like to play the brash, fast-talking reporter in his film. All of them refused. Russell found out about this while riding on a train to New York, when she read an article in the New York Times saying that she had been cast in the film and listing all the actresses who had turned the part down.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1936
    Age 28
    In her first years in Hollywood, Russell was characterized, both in her personal life and film career, as a sophisticated lady. This dissatisfied Russell, who claimed in a 1936 interview:
    More Details Hide Details Being typed as a lady is the greatest misfortune possible to a motion picture actress. It limits your characterizations, confines you to play feminine sops and menaces and the public never highly approves of either. An impeccably dressed lady is always viewed with suspicion in real life and when you strut onto the screen with beautiful clothes and charming manners, the most naive of theatergoers senses immediately that you are in a position to do the hero no good. I earnestly want to get away from this. First, because I want to improve my career and professional life and, secondly because I am tired of being a clothes horse – a sort of hothouse orchid in a stand of wild flowers. Russell approached director Frank Lloyd for help changing her image, but instead of helping her, Lloyd cast her as a wealthy aristocrat in Under Two Flags (1936).
  • 1935
    Age 27
    She quickly rose to fame, and by 1935, was seen as a replacement for actress Myrna Loy, as she took many roles for which Loy was initially set.
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  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1907
    Born
    Born on June 4, 1907.
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