Rudolf Nureyev
Dancer, actor
Rudolf Nureyev
Rudolf Khametovich Nureyev was a dancer of ballet and modern dance, one of the most celebrated of the 20th century. Nureyev's artistic skills explored expressive areas of the dance, providing a new role to the male ballet dancer who once served only as support to the women. Originally a Soviet citizen, Nureyev defected to the West in 1961, despite KGB efforts to stop him.
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Rudolf Nureyev's personal information overview.
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Martha Graham Dance Company Comes to GMU - FairfaxNews.com
Google News - over 5 years
... development of such leading choreographers and dancers as Merce Cunningham, Erick Hawkins, Pearl Lang, Pascal Rioult and Paul Taylor, and has created roles for guest ballet dancers, including Margot Fonteyn, Rudolf Nureyev and Mikhail Baryshnikov
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Lauren Hutton Once Jumped On A Conference Table - Jezebel
Google News - over 5 years
New New York, Rudy Giuliani, Rudolf Nureyev's jeans, not wearing a bra, Billy's Topless, taking acid when it was legal, cruising prostitutes for style inspiration with Steven Meisel, and "age-appropriate" dressing. It's surprisingly entertaining!
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New heights of Russian folk dance - Montreal Gazette
Google News - over 5 years
No doubt, Russian performers pushed the envelope, most notably in 1961, when ballet star Rudolf Nureyev defected in Paris and single-handedly ushered in a new era of virtuoso male dancing in the West. Nureyev, it's worth recalling, publicly performed
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ADIOS JOSÉ MARTINEZ ! - Culturekiosque
Google News - over 5 years
Nominated étoile in 1997, after his portrayal of James in La Sylphide, Martinez brought a new dimension to the role of a prince, particularly to Siegfried in Rudolf Nureyev's Swan Lake, to whom he gave an almost mystic, supernatural aura,
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'Schooner' headed to Mercury Theater; Joffrey gets new dancers, ballet master - Chicago Sun-Times
Google News - over 5 years
... Alberto Velasquez (born in Havana, Cuba, who trained in Mexico, France and New York); Mahallia Ward (from Austin, Texas, who received the Rudolf Nureyev Dance Education Fellowship and other awards before becoming a Joffrey Ballet trainee in 2010)
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Pathogens May Change, but the Fear Is the Same - New York Times
Google News - over 5 years
Many Americans know AIDS killed Rock Hudson, Arthur Ashe, Freddie Mercury and Rudolf Nureyev. Sad deaths, but not earth-shaking. Most probably do not know that, as he delivered his Gettysburg Address in 1863, Abraham Lincoln was just coming down with
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Requiem a beautiful way to say goodbye - Sydney Morning Herald
Google News - over 5 years
I don't have lucky knickers,'' said Lewis, who counts sharing a stage with the ballet great Rudolf Nureyev as one of his career highlights. Nor will he resort to an age-old method of overcoming stage fright - imagining the audience naked - when he
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Events in Connecticut - New York Times
Google News - over 5 years
NEW BRITAIN New Britain Museum of American Art “Rudolf Nureyev by James Wyeth.” Through July 31. “New/Now: Palimpsest,” works by Catherine Cabaniss. Through Aug. 7. “The Tides of Provincetown: Pivotal Years in America's Oldest Continuous Art Colony
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Mariinsky on world culture map - The Voice of Russia
Google News - over 5 years
In the late years of her career, Fonteyn danced with Mariinsky émigré soloist Rudolf Nureyev. Gabriela Komleva, a former Mariinsky prima and now a rehearsal choreographer, keeps fond memories of her meeting with Tamara Karsavina back in 1961
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Opera critic David Gilliard retires from Daily Mail and reflects on 40 ... - Daily Mail
Google News - over 5 years
I did not always have such amiable relations with the notoriously temperamental Rudolf Nureyev. I had been commissioned to write the biography of ballerina Dame Beryl Grey, then artistic director of London Festival Ballet (now English National Ballet),
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MarIinsky Ballet: Swan Lake, Covent Garden - review - Evening Standard
Google News - over 5 years
The Mariinsky Ballet first danced in London in 1961, the year Rudolf Nureyev defected from what was then known as the Kirov Ballet. He electrified the dance world, and the Mariinsky went on to transform attitudes to ballet
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Screen Arts Festival, City Screen, York, July 29- August 11 - The Press, York
Google News - over 5 years
Ballet highlights include the August 1 British premiere of a new restoration of Nureyev and Fonteyn: Swan Lake, featuring the classic partnership of Rudolf Nureyev and Margot Fonteyn, filmed by Austrian director Truck Branns at the Vienna State Opera
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Roland Petit dies at 87; acclaimed choreographer - Los Angeles Times
Google News - over 5 years
Roland Petit choreographed for Rudolf Nureyev and other great dancers during an eclectic career that included a stint as the head of the Paris Opera. Dancer and choreographer Roland Petit is seen in 2007 amid his collection of drawings, costumes and ... - -
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Sylvie Guillem: 6000 Miles Away – review - The Guardian
Google News - over 5 years
It's a battle that, ultimately, cannot be won, as even the great Rudolf Nureyev found to his cost when he tried to extend his performing career into his 50s. Historically, women have fared better than men in this respect, but over the age of 40 even
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Sylvie Guillem: Dancing to her own tune - The Independent
Google News - over 5 years
The secret's in her admirably single-minded approach, says Hannah Duguid Rudolf Nureyev made Sylvie Guillem the youngest étoile dancer ever at the Paris Opera Ballet, when she was 19. It was an incredible achievement for someone so young
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Rudolf Nureyev
    FIFTIES
  • 1993
    Age 54
    Died on January 6, 1993.
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  • 1992
    Age 53
    Nureyev re-entered the hospital Notre Dame du Perpétuel Secours in Levallois-Perret on 20 November 1992 and remained there until his death from cardiac complications at age 54 on 6 January 1993.
    More Details Hide Details His funeral was held in the marble foyer of the Paris Garnier Opera House. Many paid tributes to his brilliance as a dancer. One such tribute came from Oleg Vinogradov of the Kirov Ballet in St. Petersburg, Russia, stating: "What Nureyev did in the west, he could never have done here." Nureyev's grave, at a Russian cemetery in Sainte-Geneviève-des-Bois near Paris, features a tomb draped in a mosaic of an oriental carpet. Nureyev was an avid collector of beautiful carpets and antique textiles. As his coffin was lowered into the ground, music from the last act of Giselle was played and his ballet shoes were cast into the grave along with white lilies. After so many years of having been denied a place in the Kirov Ballet history, Nureyev's reputation was restored. His name was reentered in the history of the Kirov and some of his personal effects were placed on display at the theatre museum in St. Petersburg. At the famed Vaganova Academy a rehearsal room was named in his honour.
    His last public appearance was on 8 October 1992, at the premiere at Palais Garnier of a new production of La Bayadère that he choreographed after Marius Petipa for the Paris Opera Ballet.
    More Details Hide Details Nureyev had managed to obtain a photocopy of the original score by Minkus when in Russia in 1989. The ballet was a personal triumph although the gravity of his condition was evident. The French Culture Minister, Jack Lang, presented him that evening on stage with France's highest cultural award, the Commandeur de l'Ordre des Arts et des Lettres.
    In July 1992, Nureyev showed renewed signs of pericarditis but determined to forswear further treatment.
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    At that time, what inspired him to fight his illness was the hope that he could fulfill an invitation to conduct Prokofiev's Romeo and Juliet at an American Ballet Theatre benefit on 6 May 1992 at the Metropolitan Opera House in New York.
    More Details Hide Details He did so and was elated at the reception.
    In March 1992, living with advanced AIDS, he visited Kazan and appeared as a conductor in front of the audience at Musa Cälil Tatar Academic Opera and Ballet Theater, which now presents the Rudolf Nureyev Festival in Tatarstan.
    More Details Hide Details Returning to Paris, with a high fever, he was admitted to the hospital Notre Dame du Perpétuel Secours in Levallois-Perret, a suburb northwest of Paris, and was operated on for pericarditis, an inflammation of the membranous sac around the heart.
  • 1991
    Age 52
    Nureyev began a marked decline only in the summer of 1991 and entered the final phase of the disease in the spring of 1992.
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  • FORTIES
  • 1986
    Age 47
    Bruhn and Nureyev became a couple and the two remained together off and on, with a very volatile relationship for 25 years, until Bruhn's death in 1986.
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  • 1984
    Age 45
    The dancer tested positive for HIV in 1984, but for several years he simply denied that anything was wrong with his health.
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  • 1983
    Age 44
    In 1983, Nureyev was appointed director of the Paris Opera Ballet, where, as well as directing, he continued to dance and to promote younger dancers.
    More Details Hide Details He remained there as a dancer and chief of choreography until 1989. Among the dancers he groomed were Sylvie Guillem, Isabelle Guérin, Manuel Legris, Elisabeth Maurin, Élisabeth Platel, Charles Jude, and Monique Loudières. Despite advancing illness towards the end of his tenure, he worked tirelessly, staging new versions of old standbys and commissioning some of the most ground-breaking choreographic works of his time. His own Romeo and Juliet was a popular success. Nureyev did not have much patience with rules, limitations and hierarchical order and had at times a volatile temper. His impatience mainly showed itself when the failings of others interfered with his work. Most ballerinas with whom he danced, including Antoinette Sibley, Gelsey Kirkland and Annette Page paid tribute to him as a considerate partner. He socialized with Gore Vidal, Freddie Mercury, Jackie Kennedy Onassis, Mick Jagger, Liza Minnelli, Andy Warhol, Lee Radziwill and Talitha Pol, but developed an intolerance for celebrities. He kept up old friendships in and out of the ballet world for decades, and was considered to be a loyal and generous friend. He was known as extremely generous to many ballerinas, who credit him with helping them during difficult times. In particular, the Canadian ballerina Lynn Seymour – distressed when she was denied the opportunity to premiere MacMillan's Romeo and Juliet – says that Nureyev often found projects for her even when she was suffering from weight issues and depression and thus had trouble finding roles.
    In 1983 he had a non-dancing role in the movie Exposed with Nastassja Kinski.
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  • 1982
    Age 43
    In 1982, he became a naturalized Austrian.
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  • 1981
    Age 42
    In 1981, Thames Television filmed a documentary with Nureyev, including a candid interview, as well as access to him in the studio, rehearsing.
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  • THIRTIES
  • 1977
    Age 38
    In 1977 he played Rudolph Valentino in Ken Russell's Valentino, but he decided against an acting career in order to branch into modern dance with the Dutch National Ballet in 1968.
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  • 1975
    Age 36
    He celebrated another long-time partnership with Eva Evdokimova. They first appeared together in La Sylphide (1971) and in 1975 he selected her as his Sleeping Beauty in his staging for London Festival Ballet.
    More Details Hide Details Evdokimova remained his partner of choice for many guest appearances and tours across the globe with "Nureyev and Friends" for more than fifteen years.
  • 1972
    Age 33
    In 1972, Sir Robert Helpmann invited him to tour Australia with his own production of Don Quixote, his directorial debut.
    More Details Hide Details The film version (1973) features Nureyev, Lucette Aldous as Kitri, Helpmann as Don Quixote and artists of the Australian Ballet. During the 1970s, Nureyev appeared in several films and toured through the United States in a revival of the Broadway musical The King and I. He was one of the guest stars on the television series The Muppet Show where he danced in a parody called "Swine Lake", sang "Baby, It's Cold Outside" in a sauna duet with Miss Piggy, and sang and tap-danced in the show's finale, "Top Hat, White Tie and Tails". It is an appearance that is credited with making Jim Henson's series become one of the sought after programs to appear in.
  • 1970
    Age 31
    Nureyev stayed with the Royal Ballet until 1970, when he was promoted to Principal Guest Artist, enabling him to concentrate on his increasing schedule of international guest appearances and tours.
    More Details Hide Details He continued to perform regularly with The Royal Ballet until committing his future to the Paris Opera Ballet in the 1980s. Yvette Chauviré often danced with Nureyev, especially after he had defected from the Soviet Union to Paris. He described her as a "legend" Chauviré attended his funeral with French dancer and actress Leslie Caron. Rudolf Nureyev and Margot Fonteyn became long-standing dance partners and continued to dance together for many years after Nureyev's departure from the Royal Ballet. Their last performance together was in Baroque Pas de Trois on 16 September 1988 when Fonteyn was 69, Nureyev was aged 50, with Carla Fracci also starring, aged 52. Nureyev once said of Fonteyn that they danced with "one body, one soul". Together Nureyev and Fonteyn premiered Sir Frederick Ashton's ballet Marguerite and Armand, a ballet danced to Liszt's Piano Sonata in B minor, which became their signature piece. Kenneth MacMillan was forced to allow them to premiere his Romeo and Juliet, which was intended for two other dancers, Lynn Seymour and Christopher Gable. Films exist of their partnership in Les Sylphides, Swan Lake, Romeo and Juliet, and other roles.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1962
    Age 23
    In 1962, Nureyev made his screen debut in a film version of Les Sylphides.
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    Dame Ninette de Valois offered him a contract to join The Royal Ballet as Principal Dancer. His first appearance with the company was partnering Margot Fonteyn in Giselle on 21 February 1962.
    More Details Hide Details Fonteyn and Nureyev would go on to form a partnership.
  • 1961
    Age 22
    On 16 June 1961 at Le Bourget Airport in Paris, Nureyev defected with the help of French police and a Parisian socialite friend – Clara Saint, who was the daughter of the French foreign minister.
    More Details Hide Details The KGB tried to discuss it with him but he chose to stay in Paris. Within a week, he was signed up by the Grand Ballet du Marquis de Cuevas and was performing The Sleeping Beauty with Nina Vyroubova. On a tour of Denmark he met Erik Bruhn, soloist at the Royal Danish Ballet who became his lover, his closest friend and his protector until Bruhn's death in 1986. Although he petitioned the Soviet government for many years to be allowed to visit his mother, he was not allowed to do so until 1987, when his mother was dying and Mikhail Gorbachev consented to the visit. In 1989, he was invited to dance the role of James in La Sylphide with the Kirov Ballet at the Maryinsky theatre in Leningrad. The visit gave him the opportunity to see many of the teachers and colleagues he had not seen since he defected.
    However, in 1961, the Kirov's leading male dancer, Konstantin Sergeyev, was injured, and Nureyev was chosen to replace him on the Kirov's European tour.
    More Details Hide Details In Paris, his performances electrified audiences and critics. Oliver Merlin in Le Monde wrote, I will never forget his arrival running across the back of the stage, and his catlike way of holding himself opposite the ramp. He wore a white sash over an ultramarine costume, had large wild eyes and hollow cheeks under a turban topped with a spray of feathers, bulging thighs, immaculate tights. This was already Nijinsky in Firebird. Nureyev was seen to have broken the rules about mingling with foreigners, which alarmed the Kirov's management. The KGB wanted to send him back to the Soviet Union immediately. As a subterfuge, they told him that he would not travel with the company to London to continue the tour because he was needed to dance at a special performance in the Kremlin. When that didn't work they told him his mother had fallen severely ill and he needed to come home immediately to see her. He knew these were lies and believed that if he returned to the USSR, he was likely to be imprisoned, because KGB agents had been investigating him.
  • TEENAGE
  • 1955
    Age 16
    Owing to the disruption of Soviet cultural life caused by World War II, Nureyev was unable to enroll in a major ballet school until 1955, aged 17, when he was accepted by the Leningrad Choreographic School, the associate school of the Kirov Ballet.
    More Details Hide Details Alexander Ivanovich Pushkin took an interest in him professionally and allowed Nureyev to live with him and his wife. Upon graduation, Nureyev continued with the Kirov and went on to become a soloist. In his three years with the Kirov, he danced fifteen rôles, usually opposite his partner, Ninel Kurgapkina, with whom he was very well paired, although she was almost a decade older than he was. He became one of the Soviet Union's best-known dancers and was allowed to travel outside the Soviet Union, when he danced in Vienna at the International Youth Festival. Not long after, he was told by the Ministry of Culture that he would not be allowed to go abroad again. By the late 1950s, Nureyev had become a sensation in the Soviet Union. Yet, as the Kirov Ballet was preparing to go on a European tour, Nureyev's rebellious character and a non-conformist attitude quickly made him an unlikely candidate for a trip to the West, which was to be of crucial importance to the Soviet government's ambitions to portray their cultural supremacy.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1938
    Born
    Born on March 17, 1938.
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