Rudy Vallée
Singer, actor, bandleader, and entertainer
Rudy Vallée
Rudy Vallée was an American singer, actor, bandleader, and entertainer.
Biography
Rudy Vallée's personal information overview.
{{personal_detail.supertitle}}
{{personal_detail.title}}
{{personal_detail.title}}
Photo Albums
Popular photos of Rudy Vallée
News
News abour Rudy Vallée from around the web
Today in Music History - Sept. 2 - mysask.com (press release)
Google News - over 5 years
In 1934, singer Russ Colombo, who rivalled Bing Crosby and Rudy Vallee in popularity, was killed in a freak shooting accident. A friend struck a match on the barrel of an antique French pistol and the flame somehow set off a long-forgotten charge still
Article Link:
Google News article
Road Trip: Lovell and its Kezar Lake (a world-class lake, officially or not) - Lewiston Sun Journal
Google News - over 5 years
Rudy Vallee, the early 1900s crooner and Westbrook, Maine, resident who made the "Maine Stein Song" famous, once owned a compound on the lake and it still stands today, but the glory days of Vallee's legendary parties are long over
Article Link:
Google News article
Leon Anderson, Butler resident, celebrates 100th birthday - Elizabethton Star
Google News - over 5 years
Glenn Miller was "In the Mood" while Rudy Vallee crooned "As Time Goes By." He was 32 at that time, when life expectancy was 62 years, so Anderson has already surpassed that milestone. Now, 68 years later after his service during World War II,
Article Link:
Google News article
Paramount’s Last Picture Show - Brooklyn Daily Eagle
Google News - over 5 years
Gracing its ornate stage during its reign as the mecca of Brooklyn entertainment were such celebrities as Frank Sinatra, Liberace, Rudy Vallee, Ginger Rogers, Bing Crosby, Eddie Cantor, George Jessel, Mae West and most of the big band era orchestras
Article Link:
Google News article
Boise's boutique hotels form their own private Idaho - IdahoStatesman.com
Google News - over 5 years
Listen: Is that Rudy Vallee on the gramophone? No, it's just the squeal of a young guest splashing in the swimming pool outside. The wait staff hovers politely at the edges what was known as the Rose Room in the Owyhee's heyday, encouraging you to take
Article Link:
Google News article
DENNIS MCCARTHY: Band plays on for seniors, even for free - Los Angeles Daily News
Google News - over 5 years
You're talking Rudy Vallee. When you're a musician, you know when you're connecting with them, though," he says. "You may have as many as 75 percent (of the residents) with Alzheimer's, and others looking pretty disinterested in life
Article Link:
Google News article
DVD Extra: Pat, Buzz and Bacon - New York Post (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
The plot, such as it is, is a basically nonstop series of pranks exchanged by Payne and O'Brien, who has brought in Payne's down-at-the-heels band from New York as a last-minute replacement for Rudy Vallee's orchestra after a bus crash
Article Link:
Google News article
Today In History - Sports Radio ESPN 1420
Google News - over 5 years
In 1937, comedian Red Skelton appeared on radio for the first time on "The Rudy Vallee Show." In 1942, actor Clark Gable enters the United States Army as a private. In 1964, English author Ian Fleming died at the age of 56. He created the character
Article Link:
Google News article
This Week In Awesome History: Vol. 1 - Crave Online
Google News - over 5 years
The first Singing Telegram was for actor/singer Rudy Vallee on his 32 nd birthday. Video games… that you can play OUTSIDE?! Nowadays with your 3DS' and PS Vita's the Gameboy seems pretty lame, but back in '94 this thing was MINDBLOWING
Article Link:
Google News article
The almanac - UPI.com
Google News - over 5 years
They include Beatrix Potter, author and illustrator of the Peter Rabbit stories, in 1866; surrealist artist Marcel Duchamp in 1887; comedian Joe E. Brown in 1892; singer/actor/band leader Rudy Vallee in 1901; conductor Carmen Dragon in 1914;
Article Link:
Google News article
The legacy of urban renewal: 30 years on, Westbrook's downtown still hasn't ... - KeepMEcurrent.com
Google News - over 5 years
New buildings went up nearby, including two complexes intended to house small stores framing a walking mall area known as Westbrook Common, dominated by a sculpture erected in honor of crooner and Westbrook native Rudy Vallee
Article Link:
Google News article
Bob Trendler, 1912-2011 - Chicago Tribune
Google News - over 5 years
He met his wife, Annette, while she was performing at the LaSalle Hotel in Chicago with the Three Graces, a trio that sang with Rudy Vallee. In 1941, Mr. Trendler was appointed director of the WGN Dance Orchestra. And he was WGN's choral director
Article Link:
Google News article
Optometrist also had jazz career - Lewiston Sun Journal
Google News - over 5 years
He occasionally played engagements at the Old Orchard Pier, and some nights he was on the bandstand with a new sensation from Westbrook named Rudy Vallee. After high school, he was planning on optometry as a career, and that took him to Boston for his
Article Link:
Google News article
MIKE GOODSON: Football is Sington family tradition - Gadsden Times
Google News - over 5 years
In California, Sington met Rudy Vallee and Johnny Mack Brown. Vallee wrote a song about Sington, “Football Freddie,” that would go on to become a nationwide hit. To keep Sington from being enticed into a movie career, University President George Denny
Article Link:
Google News article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Rudy Vallée
    TEENAGE
  • 1986
    Vallée died of cancer at his home on July 3, 1986 while watching the televised centennial ceremonies of the restored Statue of Liberty.
    More Details Hide Details His wife said his last words were: "I wish we could be there; you know how I love a party". He is interred in St. Hyacinth's Cemetery in Westbrook, Maine. Vallée was known for possessing a quick temper and for using foul language, especially during rehearsals. Longtime NBC announcer George Ansbro wrote in his memoirs that Vallée "had quite a temper and a very foul mouth Almost always the butt of his nastiness was the orchestra his outbursts were mean-spirited, and he didn't care who overheard". Alton Cook, however, wrote that "Rudy Vallee may be fuming at his orchestra, but a Vallee hour rehearsal never quite loses its air of being a gathering of old friends Rudy is grimly serious about rehearsal. He sometimes has his band spend a quarter-hour going over one short passage that doesn't satisfy him. On those occasions his temper wears thin "
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1971
    He appeared in the campy 1960s Batman television show as the villain Lord Marmaduke Ffogg and in 1971 made a television appearance as a vindictive surgeon in the Night Gallery episode "Marmalade Wine."
    More Details Hide Details He toured with a one-man theater show into the 1980s, occasionally opening for The Village People. Vallée was married four times: Eleanor wrote a memoir, My Vagabond Lover. Always loyal to Yale University, he never forgot his Maine roots, and maintained an estate at Kezar Lake in Maine.
  • OTHER
  • 1961
    Vallée performed on Broadway as J.B. Biggley in the 1961 musical How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying and reprised the role in the 1967 film version.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1955
    In 1955, Vallée was featured in Gentlemen Marry Brunettes, co-starring Jane Russell, Alan Young, and Jeanne Crain.
    More Details Hide Details The production was filmed on location in Paris. The film was based on the Anita Loos novel that was a sequel to her acclaimed Gentlemen Prefer Blondes. Gentlemen Marry Brunettes was popular throughout Europe at the time and was released in France as A Paris Pour les Quatre ("Paris for the Four"), and in Belgium as Tevieren Te Parijs.
  • 1942
    He appeared opposite Claudette Colbert in Sturges's 1942 screwball comedy The Palm Beach Story.
    More Details Hide Details Other films in which he appeared include I Remember Mama, Unfaithfully Yours and The Bachelor and the Bobby-Soxer.
  • 1936
    Vallée also wrote the introduction for Armstrong's 1936 book Swing That Music.
    More Details Hide Details In 1929, Vallée made his first feature film, The Vagabond Lover for RKO Radio. His first films were made to cash in on his singing popularity. While his initial performances were rather wooden, his acting greatly improved in the late 1930s and 1940s, and by the time he began working with Preston Sturges in the 1940s, he had become a successful comedic supporting player.
    He stayed with Victor until signing with ARC in 1936, who released his records on their Perfect, Melotone, Conqueror and Romeo labels until 1937 when he returned to Victor.
    More Details Hide Details Along with his group, The Connecticut Yankees, Vallée's best known popular recordings included: "The Stein Song" (aka University of Maine fighting song) in 1929 and "Vieni, Vieni" in the latter 1930s. Vallée sang fluently in three Mediterranean languages, and always varied the keys, thus paving the way for later pop crooners such as Dean Martin, Andy Williams and Vic Damone. Another memorable rendition of his is "Life Is Just a Bowl of Cherries", in which he imitates Willie Howard's voice in the final chorus. One of his record hits was "The Drunkard Song", popularly known as "There Is a Tavern in the Town." Vallée couldn't stop laughing for the last couple of verses – supposedly he struggled to keep a straight face at the corny lyrics, and the band members egged him on. He managed a second take reasonably well. The "laughing" version was so infectious, however, that Victor released both takes (take 1 was issued on Victor 24721 with a regular Victor label, and take 2 was issued on Victor 24739 on a special white label that read in bright red: "Dear Rudy, What do you say we let the public have this one? The slip-up makes the record sound funnier" – E. Wallerstein" and "O.K. – R. Vallée".)
  • 1933
    His records were issued on Victor's new budget label, Bluebird, until November 1933 when he was moved up to the full-priced Victor label.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1932
    In August 1932, he signed with Columbia (where they gave him a special designed label) and stayed with them through 1933; he returned to Victor in June 1933.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1929
    He signed to Victor in February 1929 and remained with them through to late 1931, leaving after a heated dispute with company executives over title selections.
    More Details Hide Details He then recorded for the short-lived, but extremely popular "Hit of the Week" label (which sold records laminated onto cardboard).
    He was one of the first modern pop stars of the teen idol type. In the words of a magazine writer in 1929, "At the microphone he is truly a romantic figure.
    More Details Hide Details Faultlessly attired in evening dress, he pours softly into the radio's delicate ear a stream of mellifluous melody. He appears to be coaxing, pleading and at the same time adoring the invisible one to whom his song is attuned." Rudy Vallée was born Hubert Prior Vallée in Island Pond, Vermont, the son of Charles Alphonse Vallée and Catherine née Lynch. Both of his parents were born and raised in Vermont; however his grandparents were immigrants. The Vallées were francophone Canadians from neighboring Quebec, while the Lynches were from Ireland. Vallée grew up in Westbrook, Maine.
  • 1928
    Vallée's recording career began in 1928 recording for Columbia Records' cheap labels (Harmony, Velvet Tone, and Diva).
    More Details Hide Details
    Vallée was given a recording contract and in 1928, he started performing on the radio.
    More Details Hide Details Vallée became the most prominent, and arguably the first, of a new style of popular singer, the crooner. Previously, popular singers needed strong projecting voices to fill theaters in the days before the electric microphone. Crooners had soft voices that were well suited to the intimacy of the new medium of the radio. Vallée's trombone-like vocal phrasing on "Deep Night" would inspire later crooners such as Bing Crosby, Frank Sinatra, and Perry Como to model their voices on jazz instruments. Vallée also became what was perhaps the first complete example of the 20th century mass media pop star. Flappers mobbed him wherever he went. His live appearances were usually sold out, and even if his singing could hardly be heard in those venues not yet equipped with the new electronic microphones, his screaming female fans went home happy if they had caught sight of his lips through the opening of the emblematic megaphone he often sang through. A brief caricature of him in the Fleischer Brothers' color Betty Boop theatrical short cartoon from 1934 Poor Cinderella depicts him singing through a megaphone. Another caricature is found in Crosby, Columbo, and Vallee, a cartoon which parodies the popularity of himself, Bing Crosby, and Russ Columbo.
  • 1924
    After playing drums in his high school band, Vallée played clarinet and saxophone in various bands around New England as a teenager. From 1924 through 1925, he played with the Savoy Havana Band at the Savoy Hotel in London, where his fellow band-members discouraged his attempts to become a vocalist.
    More Details Hide Details He then returned to the United States to obtain a degree in philosophy from Yale, where he played in the Yale Collegians with future New Yorker cartoonist Peter Arno. After graduation, he formed his own band, "Rudy Vallée and the Connecticut Yankees", having named himself after influential saxophonist Rudy Wiedoeft. With this band, which featured two violins, two saxophones, a piano, a banjo and drums, he started singing (supposedly reluctantly at first). He had a rather thin, wavering tenor voice and seemed more at home singing sweet ballads than jazz numbers. However, his singing, together with his suave manner and boyish good looks, attracted great attention, especially from young women.
  • 1917
    He was discharged at the Naval Training Station, Newport, Rhode Island, on May 17, 1917 with 41 days of active service.
    More Details Hide Details
    He enlisted in Portland, Maine on March 29, 1917, under the false birthdate of July 28, 1899.
    More Details Hide Details
    In 1917, he decided to enlist for World War I, but was discharged when the Navy authorities found out that he was only 15.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1901
    Born on July 28, 1901.
    More Details Hide Details
Original Authors of this text are noted here.
All data offered is derived from public sources. Spokeo does not verify or evaluate each piece of data, and makes no warranties or guarantees about any of the information offered. Spokeo does not possess or have access to secure or private financial information. Spokeo is not a consumer reporting agency and does not offer consumer reports. None of the information offered by Spokeo is to be considered for purposes of determining any entity or person's eligibility for credit, insurance, employment, housing, or for any other purposes covered under the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA)