Rupert Hamer
Australian politician
Rupert Hamer
Sir Rupert James Hamer, AC, KCMG, ED, generally known until he was knighted in 1982 as Dick Hamer, Australian Liberal Party politician, was the 39th Premier of Victoria, serving from 1972 to 1981.
Biography
Rupert Hamer's personal information overview.
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News
News abour Rupert Hamer from around the web
Baillieu must stay true to the environment - The Age
Google News - over 5 years
Sir Rupert Hamer's government of the 1970s, in particular, left a legacy of environmental concern and legislative reform that continues to enrich the state's famed liveability. The Hamerite Victorian Liberal tradition is founded on such things as the
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Developer and critic on common ground - Sydney Morning Herald
Google News - over 5 years
Both suggest following the lead of Rupert Hamer and his planning minister Alan Hunt, who 40 years ago foresaw a need for regional planning authorities to develop the city's ''green wedges'' - farmland and open space between the endless suburbia
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Google News article
The digital city delivers in paperless push - IDM.net.au
Google News - over 5 years
The Victorian council's Information Management Branch has been rewarded with recognition in Victoria's 2011 Sir Rupert Hamer Records Management Awards. Council's CEO Phil Pearce said the branch was awarded for improved processes and increased use of
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Review threatens to destroy 'Melbourne's lungs' - The Age
Google News - over 5 years
He would not rule out more commercial and residential development in the corridors dubbed ''Melbourne's lungs'' by their champion, former Liberal premier Sir Rupert Hamer. The move comes amid mounting controversy over fund-raising by Liberal MPs in
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BBC Afghanistan stringer killed in insurgent attack - Journalism.co.uk
Google News - over 5 years
According to the US-based Committee to Protect Journalists, three journalists were killed in the country last year, making it the 11th most dangerous country for the media. They included Daily Mirror defence correspondent Rupert Hamer, who was killed
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Warrnambool demolition fired passion for heritage - Warrnambool Standard
Google News - over 5 years
It was not long after former premier Rupert Hamer had enacted Australia's first planning legislation to protect historic buildings in the early 1970s. An interim protection order was placed on what was a stately old two-storey building on the corner of
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The frontline club - The Independent
Google News - almost 6 years
Rupert Hamer, a reporter with the Sunday Mirror was killed in Helmand at the end of 2009; Phil Coburn, a photographer accompanying him suffered severe leg injuries. They were in a 15-ton armoured carrier, a Mine-Resistant Ambush-Protected Vehicle
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YouTube launches channel as memorial to fallen journalists - The Guardian
Google News - almost 6 years
Among the 29 clips already available are two about the death in Afghanistan of Rupert Hamer of the Sunday Mirror (see here and here). There is also the clip - reproduced above - about photographer Robert Capa, the man who took one of the most iconic
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Ted Baillieu produces The Crucible - The Age
Google News - almost 6 years
On Thursday, Mr Baillieu announced details of the Coalition's $24 million funding package for the Victorian College of the Arts - an institution brought into being in the early 1970s by the late Sir Rupert Hamer, another Liberal
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Afghan War Just a Slice Of Coverage
NYTimes - about 6 years
As the Obama administration conducted an Afghanistan-Pakistan strategy review this month, the news media did too, and the coverage came peppered with question marks. The same week that ABC News scheduled a series of segments titled ''Afghanistan: Can We Win?,'' Katie Couric of the ''CBS Evening News'' devoted six minutes to a special report, ''Can
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NYTimes article
British Journalist and American Marine Die in Afghan Bomb Explosion
NYTimes - about 7 years
A British journalist embedded with an American unit in Helmand Province was killed along with a Marine when their vehicle struck a roadside bomb, the British Defense Ministry reported Sunday. It was the second time in two weeks that a Western journalist had been killed on an embedded assignment, underscoring the increased risk on the roads as
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Rupert Hamer
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 2004
    Age 87
    Shortly after his death in 2004, the main concert hall of the Melbourne Arts Centre, of which Hamer had played a significant role in its development and the arts in Victoria generally, known as the Melbourne Concert Hall, was renamed the Hamer Hall.
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  • 1982
    Age 65
    Hamer remained active in public and community affairs after his retirement. He was chairman of the Victorian State Opera from 1982 to 1995, president of the Victorian College of the Arts from 1982 to 1996 and a patron of the Public Transport Users Association from 1989.
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  • 1979
    Age 62
    By 1979, however, the gloss was wearing off the Hamer image, as Victoria was beset by increasing economic difficulties, rising unemployment, industrial unrest and a decline in Victoria's traditional manufacturing industrial base.
    More Details Hide Details At the same time, the Labor Party was mounting a stronger challenge to the Liberals than it had in some time. Frank Wilkes had taken over as ALP leader from Holding in 1977, and took Labor into the 1979 election with a realistic chance of winning government for the first time since 1955. Ultimately, the Liberals suffered an 11-seat swing, losing many seats in eastern Melbourne. Their majority was reduced to only one seat, although they could also count on the support of the rural-based National Country Party. In spite of the setback, Hamer continued in office. He promoted some new younger ministers such as Lou Lieberman (Planning), Norman Lacy (Educational Services and The Arts) and Jeff Kennett (Housing) who continued to pursue a reformist liberal agenda particularly in human services, education, environment protection, planning and the arts. It reformed the administration of the highly centralised Department of Education in Victoria into a regionalised organisation with devolution of greater control to local schools. It established a Special Assistance Program to address illiteracy and innumeracy in primary schools. It introduced a Health and Human Relations Education curriculum and compulsory Physical Education in government schools. Also, it completed the construction of the Victorian Arts Centre, established the Australian Children's Television Foundation, established the Meat Market Craft Centre, acquired and established the Heide Museum of Modern Art, created Film Victoria and reconstituted the Victorian College of the Arts.
  • FIFTIES
  • 1974
    Age 57
    Hamer was instrumental in the introduction of the Historic Buildings Act 1974 and made significant moves in 1977 which guaranteed the protection of several significant buildings including the Windsor Hotel and Regent Theatre in Melbourne and Shamrock Hotel in Bendigo.
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  • 1973
    Age 56
    Hamer represented such a sharp change from the Bolte era that he was able to campaign in the 1973 election as a new, reformist leader, despite the fact that the Liberals had been in power for 18 years.
    More Details Hide Details Employing the slogan "Hamer Makes It Happen", he won a landslide against the Labor opposition under Clyde Holding, increasing his party's already large majority. He won an even larger victory in 1976, also defeating Holding. Hamer, assisted by key allies such as Planning Minister Alan Hunt, Conservation Minister Bill Borthwick, Attorney-General Haddon Storey, Social Welfare Minister Vasey Houghton, Housing and Youth Sport and Recreation Minister Brian Dixon and Community Welfare Services Minister Walter Jona moved to modernise and liberalise government in Victoria. Environmental protection laws were greatly strengthened, the death penalty was abolished, Aboriginal communities were given ownership of their lands, abortion and homosexuality were decriminalised and anti-discrimination laws were introduced. Restrictions on shop trading hours, and on public entertainment on Sundays, were eased. A major new centre for the performing arts was built in the centre of Melbourne. These measures won the support of middle-class voters, and the Melbourne daily The Age, which had been critical of Bolte during his later years in power, strongly supported Hamer's government.
  • 1972
    Age 55
    Bolte retired in 1972 and Hamer succeeded him as Liberal leader and Premier, despite opposition from the conservative wing of the party.
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  • FORTIES
  • 1964
    Age 47
    He was Minister for Local Government 1964–1971.
    More Details Hide Details After Deputy Premier Arthur Rylah was forced to retire due to a stroke, Hamer was elected in a by-election for Rylah's Legislative Assembly seat of Kew in East Melbourne. He immediately assumed Rylah's portfolios of Deputy Premier and Chief Secretary. Although he was loyal to Bolte, he had a reputation for being much more liberal than his rough-edged conservative leader.
  • 1962
    Age 45
    He was appointed to the cabinet of the long-serving Premier, Henry Bolte, in 1962, becoming Assistant Chief Secretary.
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  • 1958
    Age 41
    In 1958 he was elected to the Victorian Legislative Council for East Yarra Province.
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  • TWENTIES
  • 1944
    Age 27
    In 1944 he married April Mackintosh, with whom he had five children.
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  • 1939
    Age 22
    He joined the Australian Army in 1939 and served at Tobruk and El Alamein and in New Guinea and Normandy.
    More Details Hide Details After the war he became a partner in his family's law firm and was active in the Liberal Party.
  • TEENAGE
  • 1936
    Age 19
    Dick Hamer was educated at Geelong Grammar School and graduated in law from the University of Melbourne, where he was resident at Trinity College from 1936.
    More Details Hide Details He was a member, with his brother Alan, of the College First XVIII Australian Rules football team, and was Secretary of the Student Club.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1916
    Born
    Born in 1916.
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Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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