Russ Columbo
singer, violinist, actor
Russ Columbo
Biography
View basic information about Russ Columbo.
Deceased
02 September 1934
home town
City of Camden
Death Place
Los Angeles, California
Career Highlights
Some highlights of Russ Columbos career
Label
Russ columbo
Alternative names
Colombo Ruggiero Eugenio di Rodolpho
Active years end year
1934-01-01t00:00:00+01:00
Photo Albums
Popular photos of Russ Columbo
News
News abour Russ Columbo from around the web
Interview: Mickey Clark, Blacklisted Collector of 78rpm Classics - Seattlest
Google News - over 5 years
He hosted a massive collection of 78rpm jazz “videos” on his page, with special emphases on the 1920s and 30s: Bix Beiderbecke, Scrappy Lambert, Helen Kane, Paul Whiteman, Russ Columbo, Amelita Galli-Curci, and literally hundreds of others
Article Link:
Google News article
Forget gold, TCM strikes platinum, blonde that is, with Carole Lombard Aug. 28 - Examiner.com
Google News - over 5 years
Following her divorce from Powell, Lombard reportedly dated actors Gary Cooper, George Raft, screenwriter Robert Riskin and singer Russ Columbo. According to biographer Larry Swindell's 1975 Lombard bio, Screwball: The Life of Carole Lombard,
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Google News article
KAFM NOTES: Jumping in the stream - Grand Junction Free Press
Google News - over 5 years
In the mid-1960s, very few people had actually ever seen a Charlie Chaplin film, or knew who Russ Columbo was. Even more recently, when I was in college in the early 1980s, it was nearly impossible to find music by the bubblegum group the 1910 Fruitgum
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Google News article
Danny Stiles: The 'Vicar of Vintage' endures even after his passing - newjerseynewsroom.com
Google News - over 5 years
The likes of the Boswell Sisters, Glenn Miller, Benny Goodman, Russ Columbo, Frank Sinatra, Sophie Tucker, Fanny Brice, Eddie Cantor and Irving Berlin. And towards the end, he was just about the only one playing this type of music on the radio
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Google News article
MUSIC REVIEW | TONY MARTIN; A Crooner Returns, With a Swing In His Heart
NYTimes - almost 8 years
To watch the 96-year-old Tony Martin perform songs he recorded more than six decades ago in a voice that is surprisingly unchanged from what it was in the 1940s and '50s is to witness how popular songs and memory can work together as a kind of Proustian madeleine. Mr. Martin, who opened a five-night engagement at Feinstein's at Loews Regency on
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NYTimes article
Ready With a Song And a Story at 95
NYTimes - almost 9 years
''Tony Martin? The singer? Used to be married to Cyd Charisse? I thought he was. ...'' Whatever you thought, forget it. He is alive and well, still married to Cyd Charisse and still singing; Saturday night, in fact, he is winding up a five-night engagement at Feinstein's at Loews Regency, on Park Avenue. And he's 95 -- yes, 95 -- years old. His
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NYTimes article
MUSIC REVIEW; No Tomorrow? 95 Years of Yesterdays
NYTimes - almost 9 years
The singer Tony Martin may be his generation's Last Man Standing. A belting crooner of the old school whose 1949 hit, ''There's No Tomorrow,'' adapted from ''O Sole Mio,'' predated ''It's Now or Never,'' Elvis Presley's version of the same Italian melody (with different lyrics) by 11 years, he turned 95 last December. The fellow crooners -- Russ
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NYTimes article
Frankie Laine, 93, the Hit-Making Crooner Who Used His Voice 'Like a Horn,' Is Dead
NYTimes - almost 10 years
Frankie Laine, a singer who achieved enormous popularity in the 1940s and 50s with a robust voice and a string of hits including ''That's My Desire,'' ''Mule Train,'' ''Ghost Riders in the Sky'' and ''Jezebel,'' died on Tuesday in San Diego. He was 93. The cause was cardiovascular disease, said A. C. Lyles, a friend and film producer. Mr. Laine
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NYTimes article
Paid Notice: Memorials COLUMBO, RUSS
NYTimes - over 12 years
COLUMBO--Russ. 70 years have passed since that fateful day, Sept 2, 1934, yet your voice lingers on. International Russ Columbo Fan Club Harvey Gittler, President Oberlin, OH
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NYTimes article
BOOKS IN BRIEF: NONFICTION
NYTimes - over 12 years
YOU CALL IT MADNESS The Sensuous Song of the Croon. By Lenny Kaye. Villard, $25.95. Was electricity as important to Bing Crosby as it was to Jimi Hendrix? According to Lenny Kaye -- the lead guitarist with the Patti Smith Group -- technological advances in the 1930's gave birth to what we think of as popular song. Citing sound films, radio and,
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NYTimes article
HOLIDAY FILMS: RETROSPECTIVES; As Movies Began to Talk, The Effect Was Visible
NYTimes - about 15 years
IN Fritz Lang's film ''Spies,'' one of the last great silent films, there is a droll sequence in which the hero (Willy Fritsch) visits the apartment of the heroine (Gerda Maurus) and, sitting down opposite her, tenderly takes her hands in his. It is afternoon. Their acquaintance dates back only to the previous night, when she ran into and then out
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NYTimes article
CRITIC'S NOTEBOOK; A Posthumous Hit Parade For Ever-Serene Perry Como
NYTimes - over 15 years
Tranquillity is one musical quality that has earned scant critical respect in the annals of American pop. For decades, terms like Muzak and elevator music have been affixed contemptuously to sounds deemed too soft and complacent to be taken seriously in a culture obsessed with upward mobility and the grinding friction it produces. When the
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NYTimes article
Springtime for the Music Man in Me
NYTimes - over 15 years
LONG, long ago. The early summer of 1935. I was 9 years old, happy as a lark, and living with my widowed mother and three older brothers in an $18-a-month fifth-floor walkup in a tenement at 365 South Third Street in the Williamsburg section of Brooklyn. We lived in the back. Though it was the depths of the Depression, there was music in the air.
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NYTimes article
MUSIC; Bing Crosby, The Unsung King of Song
NYTimes - almost 16 years
FOR the last decade, whenever I mentioned to anyone that I was working on a life of Bing Crosby, the usual response was, ''Why?'' I can't say I was surprised. For 30 years, between 1927 and 1956, Crosby was a looming presence in America's cultural landscape. At the peak of his career, in the 1930's and 1940's, he was thought by many to be the most
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NYTimes article
ON LANGUAGE; Don't Touch That Dial
NYTimes - about 30 years
A NEW LANGUAGE is being pounded into our ears. It is called dialect - not the regional speech understood by speakers of the same general language, but the arcane argot of the radio dial. ''Turn off that noise,'' I used to say to my kids, ''and play some nice music.'' That sentence no longer communicates; in the past, it used to draw raucous
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NYTimes article
OBSERVER; THE NEW YORK WHATS
NYTimes - over 31 years
I had just said ''Madonna who?'' when The New York Times landed on the doorstep. ''You've got to be kidding,'' said the kid to whom I had just said ''Madonna who?'' ''Shove off, kid,'' said I, picking up the newspaper of record. ''It's time to find out who did it to whom in Lebanon again yesterday.'' Yes, that's what I really said: ''Who did it to
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NYTimes article
On Language; YOU NOT TARZAN, ME NOT JANE
NYTimes - over 31 years
AMERICA'S RELAtionship with New Zealand, a nice country with a democratic tradition, ain't what it used to be. Wellington doesn't want our nuclear-armed vessels visiting its ports, and Washington thinks a military alliance must be a two-way street. Seeking to capture the new feeling between Yanks and Kiwis in a phrase, I hit upon a song that Russ
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NYTimes article
OBSERVER; PICK YOUR MENACE
NYTimes - over 31 years
I've had a nasty suspicion lately that I may be a pinko. It came on me very strong Saturday when, searching the radio dial for that fellow who plays Russ Columbo and other 1931-vintage records, I picked up President Reagan instead. The President was talking about the Red menace in Nicaragua. He often does. The Red menace in Nicaragua seems to prey
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NYTimes article
ESSAY; FRIENDS, ALLIES NO MORE
NYTimes - almost 32 years
HONOLULU Russ Columbo, the crooner who captured American hearts before there were any Grammy Awards, made popular a 1930's song that expressed the poignant change of a relationship: ''Friends, Lovers No More.'' That has become the theme song of New Zealand and the United States, in one of those little episodes in the relations between nations that
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NYTimes article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Russ Columbo
1908
Born on January 14, 1908.
1928
By 1928, at the age of 20, Columbo began to participate in motion pictures, including a Vitaphone short in which Columbo appeared as a member of Gus Arnheim and His Orchestra.
Eventually, he did obtain some feature work in front of the camera, but he slowed down his activities in cinema to pursue other interests. At the time of his death, Columbo had just completed work on the film Wake Up and Dream; he was on his way to stardom when his life was cut short. Among Columbo's other films are: Woman to Woman (with Betty Compton), Wolf Song (with Lupe Vélez), The Texan (with Gary Cooper), and Broadway Thru a Keyhole. Columbo performed seven vocals while with Arnheim as a member of the string section, six for Okeh Records and only one for Victor ("A Peach of a Pair") on June 18, 1930, a few months before Bing Crosby joined the band, along with Al Rinker and Harry Barris as "The Rhythm Boys").
1931
Columbo ran a nightclub for a while, The Club Pyramid, but gave it up when his manager told him he had star potential. In 1931, he traveled to New York City with his manager, songwriter Con Conrad.
Conrad secured a late-night radio slot with NBC. This led to numerous engagements, a recording contract with RCA Victor records, and tremendous popularity with legions of mostly female fans. Not long after arriving in New York, Columbo met actress Dorothy Dell at an audition for the Ziegfeld Follies and began seeing her. Conrad did his best to break the relationship up with a series of publicity-created "ruse romances" involving Columbo and actresses such as Greta Garbo and Pola Negri; it succeeded. (Dorothy Dell died in an auto accident in June 1934—just months before Columbo's own fatal accident.) The type of singing that was popularized by the likes of Columbo, Rudy Vallee, and Bing Crosby is called crooning. Columbo disliked the label, but it caught on with the general public. It gained popular credence, despite its initial use as a term of derision for the singers employing their low, soothing voices in romantic songs. Similarly, to reinforce his romantic appeal, he was called "Radio's Valentino."
1932
Columbo is one of the three famous crooners named in the 1932 Looney Tunes cartoon, Crosby, Columbo, and Vallee.
1934
On Sunday, September 2, 1934, Columbo was shot under peculiar circumstances by his longtime friend, photographer Lansing Brown, while Columbo was visiting him at home.
Brown had a collection of firearms and the two men were examining various pieces. Quoting Brown's description of the accident: I was absent-mindedly fooling around with one of the guns. It was of a dueling design and works with a cap and trigger. I was pulling back the trigger and clicking it time after time. I had a match in my hand and when I clicked, apparently the match caught in between the hammer and the firing pin. There was an explosion. Russ slid to the side of his chair. The ball ricocheted off a nearby table and hit Columbo above the left eye. Surgeons at Good Samaritan Hospital made an unsuccessful attempt to remove the ball from Columbo's brain; he died less than six hours after the shooting. Columbo's death was ruled an accident, and Brown exonerated from blame. His funeral mass was attended by numerous Hollywood luminaries, including Bing Crosby and Carole Lombard, who was to have had dinner with Columbo the evening of the accident and who was romantically involved with him.
Died on September 2, 1934.
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