Ruth Chatterton
Actress, novelist
Ruth Chatterton
Ruth Chatterton was an American actress, novelist, and early aviatrix.
Biography
Ruth Chatterton's personal information overview.
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Photo Albums
Popular photos of Ruth Chatterton
News
News abour Ruth Chatterton from around the web
TBR; Inside the List
NYTimes - over 5 years
SLEEP, MEMORY: George R. R. Martin, as expected, claims the hardcover fiction throne with ''A Dance With Dragons,'' the fifth installment in his ''Song of Ice and Fire'' fantasy series. But this week's list does feature one out-of-nowhere literary sensation. Back in 2008, S. J. Watson was a 30-something London audiologist working with deaf children
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The Hot List: Portland GEAR Con, Portland's funniest person, Top Down cinema ... - OregonLive.com
Google News - over 5 years
An example: this week's Top Down Rooftop Cinema entry, "Female," a 1933 vehicle for Ruth Chatterton as a businesswoman who enjoys her power -- and her love life. Doors at 7 pm, music by A La Mode at 8 pm, movie at 9 pm, Thursday; $9; on the rooftop
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The Greatest Hollywood Director You May Never Have Heard Of - Huffington Post (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Dodsworth (1936)- Sam Dodsworth (Walter Huston), a business tycoon, decides to retire and take an extended trip to Europe with wife Fran (Ruth Chatterton). Unfortunately, Sam's financial success has only increased Fran's latent vanity and
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DVDS; On the William Wellman Depression Express
NYTimes - almost 8 years
AS a filmmaker William Wellman loved planes, trains and automobiles -- but mostly planes. A volunteer member of the Lafayette Flying Corps in World War I, he drew on his experiences as a combat pilot for ''Wings'' (1927), his first major hit as a director and the first film to win the Academy Award for best picture (then called most outstanding
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THE WEEK AHEAD | FEB. 15 - FEB. 21 | Film
NYTimes - about 8 years
Film Stephen Holden We haven't touched the economic depths of the Great Depression, and we may never do so. But ''Breadlines and Champagne,'' Film Forum's survey of 50 movies made in the early and mid-1930s, is a reminder that art flourishes in hard as well as flush times, and that one way or another harsh social realities find their way onto the
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Song Lyrics and Memoirs for All Seasons
NYTimes - about 8 years
The holiday season can be a bit of a bummer for die-hard theater lovers. They have already seen all of the important fall openings -- all they care to, anyway -- and they tend to turn up their noses at the festive fare aimed at extracting maximum dollars from tourists with children. To help divert your friends during this anxious time, these new
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CRITIC'S CHOICE
NYTimes - almost 9 years
FORBIDDEN HOLLYWOOD COLLECTION, VOLUME 2 The first volume of Warner Home Video's ''Forbidden Hollywood Collection,'' devoted to the frank and racy films that emerged from Hollywood before the strict enforcement of the Production Code in 1934, contained a bombshell in the form of a recently rediscovered, uncensored print of ''Baby Face,'' a 1933
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What's On Tonight
NYTimes - almost 9 years
9:30 P.M. (TCM) THOU SHALT NOT: SEX, SIN AND CENSORSHIP IN PRE-CODE HOLLYWOOD This new documentary examines the era before the Production Code was enforced, beginning in 1934. It was one of the most intriguing periods in Hollywood history, shaped by social, financial and moral forces. TCM will also screen a few provocative examples, starting at 8
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CRITIC'S CHOICE; New DVDs
NYTimes - over 9 years
DANCE, GIRL, DANCE As one of the few films made under the Hollywood studio system with a distinctly feminist point of view, Dorothy Arzner's 1940 ''Dance, Girl, Dance'' was intensely examined by the feminist critics of the 1970s. Ms. Arzner was perhaps the only female director to carve out a coherent career in the classical Hollywood of the '20s,
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Books in Brief: Nonfiction
NYTimes - over 16 years
COMPLICATED WOMEN Sex and Power in Pre-Code Hollywood. By Mick LaSalle. Thomas Dunne/St. Martin's, $25.95. The late 1920's and early 30's were a glorious era in Hollywood for actresses like Barbara Stanwyck, Miriam Hopkins and Ruth Chatterton. They rejected the images of the vamp and the household saint of the silent era and introduced a new female
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FILM; When the Spice of Choice Was Sin
NYTimes - over 17 years
''I WISH to join the Legion of Decency, which condemns vile and unwholesome moving pictures. I unite with all who protest against them as a grave menace to youth, to home life, to country and to religion.'' So began a pledge written in the spring of 1934 by the Archbishop of Cincinnati, John T. McNicholas. Distributed in Roman Catholic churches
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USER'S GUIDE; Balancing Act: Finding the Right On-Line Service
NYTimes - over 18 years
MY friend Liz DeGennaro called the other day to say she was thinking about going on line for the first time. She figured that she would liberate her Macintosh Power PC from the closet, where it has resided in the months since she left graduate school, set up a family computer station in the corner of an almost-renovated bedroom and then ''do a
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Out of Treetops and a Sea of Daffodils, 55 Luxury Homes
NYTimes - almost 19 years
IN the 1940's and 50's, it was often the site of elegant, and sometimes raucous, parties that attracted the likes of Elizabeth Taylor and Mike Todd (who proposed to Ms. Taylor in the mansion's pine-paneled library), Tallulah Bankhead, Montgomery Clift, Truman Capote, Tennessee Williams, Roddy McDowall, Ruth Chatterton, Imogene Coca and Martha Raye.
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Treetops: An Aura of Glamour, a Trail of Tragedies
NYTimes - almost 20 years
IN florid prose, newspaper advertisements sing the praises of a neo-Georgian 30-room-plus mansion set on 110 acres lying in both Stamford and Greenwich. The property is replete with an art studio, four greenhouses, a two-story caretaker's cottage and hiking trails. A large-scale renovation in the 80's resulted in the elimination of a tennis court
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CRITIC'S NOTEBOOK; In the Beginning There Was the Play
NYTimes - over 21 years
HAVE you any idea why Alfred Lunt and Lynne Fontanne were Broadway's most exacting, most stylish acting couple? Did Hollywood deserve its reputation in the 1930's for ruining great plays and corrupting great playwrights? Is it possible that theater, at least as it had been known for more than 2,000 years, was doomed the minute the movie close-up
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Critic's Notebook; When Hollywood Could Be Naughty
NYTimes - about 23 years
THE "moral importance of entertainment" was once very much on Hollywood's mind. "It enters intimately into the lives of men and women; it affects them closely; it occupies their minds and affections during leisure hours; and ultimately touches the whole of their lives. A man may be judged by his standard of entertainment as easily as by the
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Movies Used to Be Really Good by Being Bad
NYTimes - over 23 years
From the very start of "Red-Headed Woman," Jean Harlow is looking for trouble. Trying on a dress in a shop, she asks the saleswoman, "Can you see through this?" "I'm afraid you can, ma'am," the clerk answers. Harlow snaps back, "I'll wear it." As a good-natured, small-town secretary named Lil Andrews, Harlow sleeps with her boss, breaks up his
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New & Noteworthy
NYTimes - over 24 years
A VERY THIN LINE: The Iran-Contra Affairs, by Theodore Draper. (Touchstone/Simon & Schuster, $16.) Mr. Draper's concern is that very fine line that separates legitimate from illegitimate use of our Government's power. The Iran-contra affairs, he concludes, were the most startling contemporary example of the latter. Last year our reviewer, Tom
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At the Movies
NYTimes - over 25 years
A 'Dodsworth' Remake With Gregory Peck as the film's executive producer and Broadway's Martin Richards ("The Will Rogers Follies," "Grand Hotel") as producer, plans for a remake of "Dodsworth," based on the Sinclair Lewis novel, are once again afoot. Behind the latest effort to bring to the screen a new version of the 1929 book about an American
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Irene Dunne: No Oscar, Just Love
NYTimes - over 26 years
LEAD: She was my father's favorite movie star, and my grandfather's too. Talking with my best friend, he said, ''Irene Dunne, you know, was my all-time favorite.'' She was my father's favorite movie star, and my grandfather's too. Talking with my best friend, he said, ''Irene Dunne, you know, was my all-time favorite.'' The day after her death
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Ruth Chatterton
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 1961
    Age 68
    On November 21, 1961, she suffered a cerebral hemorrhage while friends were visiting her home.
    More Details Hide Details She was taken to Norwalk Hospital in Norwalk, Connecticut where she died on November 24. She was cremated and is interred in a niche in the Lugar Mausoleum (Section 11, Lot 303) at Beechwoods Cemetery in New Rochelle, New York. For her contribution to the motion picture industry, Ruth Chatterton has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 6263 Hollywood Blvd. She is also a member of the American Theater Hall of Fame.
  • 1960
    Age 67
    After the death of her third husband in 1960, Chatterton lived alone in the home they shared near Redding, Connecticut.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1953
    Age 60
    Her last television appearance was as Gertrude in a 1953 adaptation of Hamlet, with Maurice Evans in the title role, on the anthology series Hallmark Hall of Fame.
    More Details Hide Details Chatterton was also one of the few woman aviators at the time, and was good friends with Amelia Earhart. She flew solo across the U.S. several times, and served as sponsor of the Sportsman Pilot Mixed Air Derby and the annual Ruth Chatterton Air Derby during the 1930s; she also opened the National Air Races in Los Angeles in 1936. She taught British film and stage actor Brian Aherne to fly, an experience he described at length in his 1969 autobiography, A Proper Job.
  • FIFTIES
  • 1950
    Age 57
    Her first novel, Homeward Bourne, was published in 1950 and became a best seller.
    More Details Hide Details Chatterton would go on to write two more novels. Chatterton came out of retirement in the 1950s, and appeared on U.S. television in several plays, including a TV adaptation of Dodsworth on CBS's Prudential Playhouse, alongside Mary Astor and Walter Huston.
  • FORTIES
  • 1942
    Age 49
    Chatterton married actor Barry Thomson in 1942. They remained married until his death in 1960.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1938
    Age 45
    By 1938, Chatterton had tired of motion picture acting and retired from films.
    More Details Hide Details She moved back to the Eastern United States where she lived with her third husband. She continued acting in Broadway productions and appeared in the London production of The Constant Wife, for which she received good reviews. Chatterton also raised French poodles and began a successful writing career.
  • 1933
    Age 40
    In 1933, Chatterton starred in the successful Pre-Code comedy-drama Female.
    More Details Hide Details When she left Paramount Pictures, her initial home studio, for Warner Brothers, along with Kay Francis and William Powell, it was noted that the brothers Warner needed an infusion of "class". She co-starred in the film Dodsworth (1936), for Samuel Goldwyn, which is widely regarded as her finest film; giving what many considered an Oscar-worthy performance, although she was not nominated. Due to her age and the studios' focus on younger, more bankable stars, she moved to England and continued to star in films there. Chatterton's final film was A Royal Divorce (1938).
  • THIRTIES
  • 1929
    Age 36
    Later in 1929, Chatterton was loaned to Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer where she starred in Madame X.
    More Details Hide Details The film was a critical and box office success, and effectively launched Chatterton's career. For her work in the film, Chatterton received her first nomination for an Academy Award for Best Actress. The following year, she starred in Sarah and Son, portraying an impoverished housewife who rises to fame and fortune as an opera singer. The film was another critical and financial success and Chatterton received a second Academy Award nomination for Best Actress. Later that year, Chatterton was voted the second female star of the year, behind only Norma Shearer, in a poll conducted by the West Coast film exhibitors.
    Chatterton's first film for Paramount was also her first sound film, The Doctor's Secret, released in 1929.
    More Details Hide Details Chatterton was able to make the transition from silents to sound because of her stage experience.
  • 1928
    Age 35
    With the help of Emil Jannings, she was cast in her first film role in Sins of the Fathers in 1928.
    More Details Hide Details That same year, she was signed to a contract by Paramount Pictures.
  • 1924
    Age 31
    Chatterton was married three times and had no children. In 1924, she married British actor Ralph Forbes who starred opposite her that same year in The Magnolia Lady, a musical version of the A.E. Thomas and Alice Duer Miller hit Come Out of the Kitchen. Their divorce was finalized on August 12, 1932. The following day, August 13, Chatterton married her The Rich Are Always with Us and The Crash co-star Irish-born actor George Brent, in Harrison, New York. The couple separated in March 1934 and were divorced in October 1934.
    More Details Hide Details
    In 1924, Chatterton and her first husband, actor Ralph Forbes, moved to Los Angeles.
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  • TWENTIES
  • 1914
    Age 21
    Her greatest success onstage came in 1914 when she starred in the play Daddy Long Legs, adapted from the novel by Jean Webster.
    More Details Hide Details
  • TEENAGE
  • 1911
    Age 18
    In 1911, Chatterton made her Broadway stage debut in The Great Name.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1908
    Age 15
    In 1908, Chatterton and her friends were attending a play in Washington, D.C. Chatterton later criticized the acting of the lead actress to her friends who challenged her to become a stage actress herself or "shut up".
    More Details Hide Details Chatterton accepted the challenge and, a few days later, joined the chorus of the stage show. She soon dropped out of school to further pursue a stage career. Aged 16, Chatterton joined the Friend Stock Company in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, where she remained for six months.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1892
    Born
    Chatterton was born in New York City on Christmas Eve 1892 to Walter, an architect, and Lillian (née Reed) Chatterton.
    More Details Hide Details She was of English and French extraction. Her parents separated while she was still quite young. Chatterton attended Mrs. Hagen's School in Pelham, New York.
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